The Road To Rooster Walk: Anders Osborne Talks Songwriting

first_img“All of a sudden there’s a song – there in your hotel room playing your guitar – and you write it, and two or three years later it will come true. It keeps you on your toes.”These words, spoken by Townes Van Zandt, support a popular notion of the songwriter in American popular culture: A rambling man, on the road with a band, playing venues both squalid and splendid, creating songs from thin air with little more than a beat up guitar, bottle of booze and hotel notepad.And there’s no doubt that countless great tunes have been written in such a manner. But there’s another question worth asking: In 2017, are most songs written that way?To find out, we spoke with six songwriters who will be at the ninth annual Rooster Walk Music & Arts Festival over Memorial Day weekend (May 25-28) in Martinsville, Va. These six artists: Paul Hoffman (Greensky Bluegrass), Anders Osborne, Andrew Marlin (Mandolin Orange), Lyle Divinksy (The Motet), Marcus King, and Wood Robinson (Mipso) bring different backgrounds, hometowns, experience levels and genres to the craft of songwriting.Perhaps unsurprisingly, they write songs in different manners.Read on to catch a glimpse into the daily songwriting process of Anders Osborne. Then, catch his nighttime set at Rooster Walk 9 in Martinsville, VA.Editor’s Note: This is the fourth story in a six-part “Road to Rooster Walk” series about the craft and process of songwriting. Previous installments featured The Motet, Greensky Bluegrass, and Marcus King.Called “the poet laureate of Louisiana’s fertile roots music scene” by Guitar Player magazine, Anders Osborne has released 15 albums since arriving in New Orleans in the mid-80s. His songs have been recorded by artists ranging from Keb’ Mo to Tim McGraw.Despite touring roughly nine months a year, Osborne is an ardent proponent of daily writing as habit.“You’ve got to be grabbing at the stuff every single day, or I do. I have to grab at it every day, because I think the way I look at it is that inspiration and the muse is always dancing. And ideas are always out there. And if you miss it on a Thursday in February, I don’t think it shows up again, you know, in August. I think you missed the opportunity to write that song,” he said.Due to his heavy tour schedule, Osborne often writes from the back lounge of his tour bus, and he typically begins with a guitar in hand – rather than a pen or keyboard.“I try to find something (on the guitar) that gets me inspired or that emphasizes the mood I’m in emotionally. And then if I find something that works – maybe a couple lines come out, or an idea of the lyrics – usually I work off that. And then another thing I do is I try to have several songs going at the same time, so I keep ‘em fresh. Sometimes I’ll have different sheets of paper in a circle around the room where I usually write. And then I kind of rotate, going from one to the other, keeping it fresh, and that way I don’t get stuck too much.”Though he knows what it’s like to catch lightning in a bottle and write fully-realized songs in one sitting – he wrote hit song, “Marmalade,” from the 2013 album “Three Free Amigos,” in roughly 2 minutes’ time – the songwriting process often takes several days or weeks. He likes to use the voice recording app on his smartphone to record a song idea when it hits him. Then, he develops, tweaks and refines it over the coming hours or days until it’s nearly finished. Only then will he record it a second time.“About 4 or 5 years ago I started to put down the initial musical idea. So let’s say there’s a progression or a melody that comes out, I put that on the phone, like on the little demo voice recorder, and what I try to do is to not keep recording it as I write it,” he explained. “That way I can always go back to what it was I liked the very, very first time I had the idea. And what that helps me with, and this is something I’ve been doing pretty consistently, it helps me not forget or change the original inspiration, if that makes any sense.”Osborne tries to complete at least one new song per week. And while “Marmalade” may be the quickest one he’s written, “Can You Still Hear Me?” from the 2016 album “Space Dust and Ocean Views,” might be the longest.“That (song) started probably a few months after my mother died. I started to write some stuff and then I couldn’t finish that. And that was 2001, and then I finished it in 2015, so that took 14 years,” he said. “… I forgot about it, and then my old saxophone player (Tim Green) died, and then it all sort of made sense and it came back.”Songwriters who influence Anders: Townes Van Zandt. Stephen Stills, Neal Young, Cat Stevens, Black Sabbath (“I don’t know who wrote those but there’s a lot of sort of riffy, rock stuff that I get from that.”). The melodic compositions of Cannonball Adderley, John Coletrane and Miles Davis.Song: MarmaladeNext Week on the Road to Rooster Walk: Mandolin Orange[Photo by J. Mimna Photography]last_img read more

New Saint Mary’s course explores philosophy in relation to walking

first_imgSaint Mary’s philosophy professor Patricia Sayre has decided to think outside the classroom this semester with the introduction of her new course, The Philosophy of Walking.This one-credit course takes a different approach to philosophy and requires that students simply walk during every class period. Sayre said she came up with the idea for the course after reading a book entitled “A Philosophy of Walking.”“It’s not something philosophers seem to talk about a lot,” Sayre said. “I read the book and I thought there was something I could build a course around here, but I don’t think I’d want to teach this as a straight academic course, because what’s the point in talking about walking if you’re not ever walking?”Sayre said she connects philosophical readings to every walk she and the students go on as a class. “We go on a different path every time, and it’s key to the reading in some way,” Sayre said. “One week the readings were about escaping — using walking to escape [from] ordinary life — so for this I decided we were going to go off campus. Each person got to lead for a little bit.”Sayre said she always is surprised by the walks with her students, and she is even more surprised at their responses to the walks. “Walks are unpredictable, and that’s part of the joy of it,” she said. “And even though I will do the walk in advance to plan it, it never goes the way I thought it would go. And so the responses are terribly interesting that I get in the written work.”Hanna Makowski, a senior in the class, said she appreciates this approach to philosophy because it allows room for individual thought. Makowski said she likes how the class differs from other classes.“In most classes you analyze and dissect the work of others, but in this class we are given the chance to create our own work based on our own philosophy of walking,” she said in an email.The unconventional approach to the class about more than just walking, Sayre said, and the course is about creating connections to the larger world. “We’re doing philosophy in a somewhat different way,” she said. “It’s more like thinking symbolically about what you’re doing, what you’re seeing and how, in many ways, it might be a metaphor for other existential problems you might have in life.”Sayre said one of the best things about her course is how free walking makes her feel. For her and her students, she said, this time is a time to get away from the stress of the responsibilities of everyday life.“It’s like this little window of time when you are free from all of that,” Sayre said. “When you’re walking you simply can’t do those other things, you have time to yourself, your mind is free.” Tags: new class, philosophy, walkinglast_img read more

Tracking COVID-19 at Notre Dame

first_imgSince classes began Aug. 10, the number of COVID-19 cases continues to rise among Notre Dame community members.The Observer will update this page daily with new numbers from the University’s HERE Dashboard. These numbers are based only on tests conducted by University Health Services and the Wellness Center.This post was updated Nov. 12 at 12:18 p.m.Serena Zacharias | The Observer Notre Dame administered 377 nasal swabs and 310 saliva tests Wednesday. These testing numbers stand in a sharp decline in comparison to previous weeks.The seven-day positivity rate is 6.0%. The University has administered 10,381 diagnostic tests and 61,031 surveillance tests since Aug. 3. The estimated active number of cases is 270, and the estimated number of recovered cases is 1,209 as of Thursday. The seven-day moving average was 25.4 cases as of Thursday.After a surge in cases Aug. 17, University President Fr. John Jenkins announced the move to online classes until Sept. 2 to attempt to curb the spread. Classes resumed in a phased return Sept. 2, as cases have decreased.On Oct. 15, the Office of Student Affairs announced gatherings would be limited to 10 people following a significant increase in cases. The limit was previously 20 people as of Oct. 1.Pre-matriculation testing resulted in 33 positive cases out of 11,836 tests yielded. Notre Dame reported the first positive case on campus Aug. 6. The University linked an increase in cases to an off-campus gathering Aug. 13.All data on the dashboard is subject to change. PCR tests, which take 1-2 days to result, may lead to an increase in the number of cases on a specific day a few days later.Find our latest COVID-19 coverage here.Tags: cases, community members, COVID-19 updates, health, safetylast_img read more

Jamestown Police Report Increase In Fireworks Complaint This Month

first_imgJAMESTOWN – Officials from the Jamestown Police Department are reporting that they’ve received 65 complaints of fireworks this month in the city limits. Police say the number for the entire month of June was at 31 complaints. Officials are reminding the community that the possession and use of fireworks is illegal in New York State. Section 270.00 of the New York State Penal Law (Unlawfully Dealing with Fireworks and Dangerous Fireworks) covers the offenses and potential charges that range from a violation up to a class A Misdemeanor.Changes in the New York State Law have allowed the sale and possession of sparkling devices in designated counties. They (Sparkling Devices) are legal to possess and use within Chautauqua County and the City of Jamestown. Under section 270.00, sparkling devices are defined as devices that are ground-based or hand-held devices that produce a shower of white, gold, or colored sparks as their primary pyrotechnic effect.Additional effects may include a colored frame, an audible crackling effect, an audible whistle effect, and smoke. These devices do not rise into the air, do not fire inserts or projectiles into the air, and do not explode or produce a report (an audible crackling sound is not considered a report). Ground-based or hand-held devices that produce a cloud of smoke as their sole pyrotechnic effect are also included in this category. Police say the use of any fireworks creates both a fire and safety hazard. According to the National Fire Protection Association, fireworks start an average of 19,500 fires in 2018, including 1,900 structure fires, 500 vehicle fires, and 17,100 outside and other fires. These fires caused five deaths, 46 civilian injuries, and $105 million in direct property damage. In 2018, U.S. Hospital Emergency Rooms treated an estimated 12,900 for fireworks related injuries, half of those injuries were to the extremities and 34% were to the eye or other parts of the head. Children younger than 15 years of age accounted for more than one-third (36%) of the estimated 2018 injuries.Police encourage the community members to leave the fireworks to the professionals and to attend displays if they are offered in the area during the upcoming holiday. Police also remind everyone to utilize common sense when using legal sparkling devices within the city, as they can also be dangerous if not properly handled. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Wading River Man Charged With Easter Road Road Stabbing

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A Wading River man has been arrested for allegedly stabbing a Hampton Bays man during a road rage confrontation in Calverton on Easter, Riverhead town police said.Officers found Brett Penny, 48, suffering from a stab wound to the chest and left hand on Sound Avenue near Fresh Pond Road at 3:36 p.m. Sunday, police said.Penny was airlifted to Stony Brook University Hospital, where he is being treated for his injuries.Michael Doroski, 25, surrendered to authorities and was charged with assault. He will be arraigned Monday at Riverhead Town Justice Court.Riverhead town police detectives are continuing the investigation and ask anyone who may have witnessed the incident to call them at 631-727-4500 Ext 332.last_img read more

Miranda Lambert Sings ‘Settling Down’ Live

first_imgWild child! Miranda Lambert set the 2020 Country Music Association Awards stage on fire with her first live performance of “Settling Down” on Wednesday, November 11.Lambert, 37, opted for a stripped down version of her hit single, captivating the audience with her acoustic rendition of the track.- Advertisement – “I was terrified to get on that stage. It was the year it was at Madison Square Garden. Not only was it my first time in New York City, but it was the CMAs,” the Texas native said in a CMAs video posted last month, reflecting on the big moment. “I had a million things going through my mind. Now, I definitely know the feel of butterflies was because I cared so much. I felt like a lot was riding on that performance. It was sort of my first time to say, ‘Hey, here’s who I am as an artist.’”Lambert’s Wednesday performance came weeks after the release of her music video for “Settling Down,” in which her husband, Brendan McLoughlin, made a cameo — and his music video debut.“I think we understand why we had him in my video,” the songstress told her fans during a live Q&A on YouTube in October, after the clip for her new song was released. “Because he’s really pretty and I needed a video babe and he was there, so I mean, it just worked out.”The Grammy winner added: “My favorite part of filming was watching my husband sort of come to life on camera. It was his video debut and he’s so sweet and humble about it, but he really killed it, so that was fun to watch.”Lambert and McLoughlin, 30, tied the knot in January 2019. The pair met two months prior on the set of Good Morning America where the former NYPD officer was working security.The country singer was married to Blake Shelton from 2011 to 2015. He announced his engagement to Gwen Stefani late last month.Listen to Us Weekly’s Hot Hollywood as each week the editors of Us break down the hottest entertainment news stories! Ahead of the show, Lambert won Music Video of the Year for “Bluebird.”Country music’s biggest night was the first awards show of the year to be done with a real audience and to have celebrities in attendance amid the coronavirus pandemic. All others have been done virtually or without fans.Lambert, who had 13 CMA award wins heading into the night, first appeared on the iconic awards show stage 15 years ago with her 2005 performance of “Kerosene.”- Advertisement – – Advertisement – The “Vice” singer was the top nominee at the 54th annual awards show, which took place live in Nashville.Lambert received seven nods, including Best Female Vocalist, Entertainer of the Year, Album of the Year (Wildcard), Single of the Year and Song of the Year for “Bluebird.”Nominations for Musical Event of the Year and Music Video of the Year brought her career total to 51 nods, making her the most nominated female artist in the awards show’s history. The “House That Built Me” singer is the fourth highest-nominated artist of all time, behind George Strait, Alan Jackson and Brad Paisley.Miranda Lambert Performs Settling Down Live for the 1st Time at the CMA Awards 2020Miranda Lambert Mark J Terrill/AP/Shutterstock- Advertisement –last_img read more

Citizenship question would taint census

first_imgCombined with President Donald Trump’s anti-immigrant rhetoric, asking about citizenship status will depress the count among immigrant communities and result in inaccurate information.In a memo explaining his reasoning, Ross admitted that adding the question could depress census participation.But he argued that asking about citizenship would impose a “limited burden” on those filling out census forms, because individual responses are anonymous.Placing the burden of proof on those objecting to the change, Ross said that “no one provided evidence that reinstating a citizenship question on the decennial census would materially decrease response rates.”But it is Ross’ responsibility to oversee a fair census. There is enough evidence, anecdotal and statistical, for serious worry about the citizenship question.Census researchers have recently noted instances of heightened concern among immigrant respondents about cooperating with the count.Immigrant response rates to the yearly American Community Survey, which asks about citizenship, are lower than nonimmigrant response rates. Even without a citizenship question, the 2010 Census overcounted the non-Hispanic population and undercounted the Hispanic population. Morever, an absence of evidence would not be proof of no harm.It was Ross’ duty to show that the harm would be acceptably limited before adding a new question. By his own admission, he failed to do so.New census forms should be and generally are thoroughly tested before rollout, a process that takes years.This question is being added hastily to the form in the midst of its first and only dry run for the 2020 count.If immigrant communities are substantially undercounted, Democrats will lose seats in Congress and in statehouses.Political districts contain equal numbers of people, citizen and noncitizen alike.Nonvoters, of course, cannot choose who represents them in Washington or in state capitals. Categories: Editorial, OpinionThe following editorial appeared in The Washington Post.The census Bureau’s once-a-decade count of the country’s population determines where federal money goes and how political power is divided among states.Whether by design or incompetence, the Trump administration is threatening to rig the count against Democrats.Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, who decides what the government asks in its authoritative decennial count, announced Monday that the Census Bureau will ask respondents to report their citizenship status on the form that goes out to all U.S. households.The census is supposed to take an accurate picture of the entire country, not just of residents born or naturalized here.center_img But minors, green-card holders and other nonvoters still count.Political representation has been apportioned according to this principle since the country’s founding.If the count is off in the urban centers where immigrants congregate, blue states will lose representation and rural areas will gain political clout even more disproportionate to the number of people who actually live in them.The state of California immediately announced a lawsuit challenging Ross’ decision.But Congress also could act.Lawmakers should prevent the Trump administration from fouling the census.More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristslast_img read more

Dozens of Mexican centenarians beat coronavirus

first_imgExperts agree that the elderly are at greater risk of dying from the coronavirus, but in Mexico dozens of centenarians have beaten the odds and overcome the disease, authorities say.While the Latin American country has registered 53,000 deaths from the virus, the survivors include at least 53 people between the age of 100 and 118.Two more are at home fighting the illness just over a week after developing symptoms. In total 78 centenarians have been diagnosed with COVID-19 in Mexico, of whom 23 have died, according to official figures.One of the most surprising cases was that of a 118-year-old man from the southeastern state of Tabasco who started showing symptoms last month.He had none of the underlying conditions linked with increased risk of death from the virus and required little medical treatment.Topics :last_img read more

UWV pension fund ramps up risk with private equity, infrastructure

first_imgThe €6.3bn pension fund of insurance provider UWV has raised its risk profile by increasing exposure to private equity and infrastructure.According to its 2015 annual report, it also plans to increase real estate investments and holdings in commercial and residential mortgages at the expense of its euro-denominated government bond and equity allocations.The scheme said it had decided, based partly on a survey into the risk appetite of its participants, to allocate 10% of its portfolio to risk-bearing investments, adding that it had already reduced its strategic interest hedge from 60% to 50%.It estimates its policy change will increase its surplus return by 0.7 percentage points to 2.2%. The UWV scheme aims to raise the combined private equity and infrastructure allocation to 5%, with the help of asset manager Partners Group.Its property and mortgages portfolios are to account for 10% and 6% of overall assets, respectively.The scheme has placed the four asset classes in a separate portfolio that holds illiquid investments – next to its regular matching and return portfolios – specifically meant for generating returns for indexation.The Pensioenfonds UWV said it also wanted to focus on cost-saving via passive investment, pointing out that its developed-market equity, government bond, inflation-linked bond and commodities holdings were already under passive management.It said it would update its contracts with pensions provider TKP Pensioen and fiduciary asset manager Allianz Global Investors this year.Last year, it replaced Morgan Stanley as its active manager for local-currency emerging market debt (EMD) with Legal & General, which now manages the investments passively.It said it would review Aberdeen AM as active manager of its hard-currency EMD holdings after the manager underperformed last year by 4.1 percentage points. The UWV scheme posted a net return of -0.6% due largely to a 3.3% loss on its matching portfolio, as well as negative results on its interest and currency hedges.It said its strategy shift also reduced its return by 0.5 percentage points.The pension paid €152 per participant for pensions administration and spent 0.38% and 0.17% on asset management and transactions, respectively.Its funding stood at 95.7% as at the end of June.last_img read more

Mum who petitioned for abortion law change won’t give up

first_imgNewsTalk ZB 8 July 2016Family First Comment: Good. Neither will weThe mother who petitioned to make it mandatory for parents to know if their children under 16 have an abortion, has pledged not to give up.Hilary Kieft’s 15-year-old daughter had an abortion at boarding school, but Ms Kieft didn’t find out about it until a year later when her daughter attempted suicide.A select committee has rejected the suggestion of mandatory notification, but agreed to strengthen post-abortion counsellingMs Kieft told Mike Hosking she’s disappointed with the decision.“I’m grateful for the minor changes they’re going to do. We still can’t protect our girls. It’s still going to carry on the same. You are going to have girls that are going to try to commit suicide and girls that will commit suicide. How then are we to help them.”Family First director Bob McCoskrie said politicians are taking power away from parents, who should have a protective factor.“The politicians have treated parents as being a potential enemy and to be treated as hostile. For some reason we should only trust professional counsellors and we shouldn’t trust parents.”READ MORE: http://www.newstalkzb.co.nz/news/national/mum-who-petitioned-for-abortion-law-change-wont-give-up/.last_img read more