Neuroengineering program is focus

first_imgHarvard Medical School (HMS) and Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) in Switzerland have established a joint research and education program thanks to a contribution from the Bertarelli Foundation. The Bertarelli Program in Translational Neuroscience and Neuroengineering is a collaborative exchange aimed at improving quality of life for people with neurological disabilities.The agreement was presented today (Oct. 29) by Bertarelli Foundation Co-President Ernesto Bertarelli, Dean of Harvard Medical School Jeffrey S. Flier, and EPFL President Patrick Aebischer, in the presence of Didier Burkhalter, the head of Swiss Federal Department of Home Affairs and minister of health, science and culture.The initial $9 million donation also includes an endowment of the Bertarelli Professorship in Translational Medical Science. The inaugural incumbent will be William Chin, currently executive dean for research at Harvard Medical School. Chin will oversee the development of the new joint program, which creates a pathway from device design at EPFL to clinical testing at HMS and builds a bidirectional exchange for students and researchers from the two institutions.Flier applauded this new partnership: “Thanks to the Bertarelli family’s tremendous generosity and vision, we will be exploring an area of cutting-edge science that will lead to exciting discoveries, particularly in the field of neurotechnology, for both our institutions. I look forward to working with the Bertarelli Foundation and our Swiss partners in this new venture.”EPFL and HMS already collaborate on translational neurobiological research, notably on the visualization and simulation of the brain, headed by the EPFL Signal Processing Laboratory. In collaboration with Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard and EPFL have recently published results in a joint paper in PNAS about the structure of the brain in children between 2 and 18 years of age.“This is a great scientific opportunity to translate our bioengineering advances in neuroprosthetics into clinical studies,” said Aebischer.Bertarelli, who is a Swiss entrepreneur and philanthropist and two-time winner of America’s Cup with his team Alinghi, has already funded significant research in translational neurosciences at EPFL’s Neuroprosthetics Center within the Institute of Bioengineering. There, research in cortical and spinal implants is envisioned, while noninvasive man-machine interfaces and neural coding devices to aid in movement and machine control are already under way. EPFL scientists also hope to explore optogenetics — the use of light as a biological switch for gene expression — to create second-generation implants for the hearing-impaired.To further future collaboration, a Bertarelli Grant program will be established in 2011 for research projects at the forefront of neuroscience and neuroengineering by students and scientists from the two faculties. Results from novel coursework and research will be shared at a joint symposium to be held annually in Boston and Lausanne, alternatively.“Since studying at Harvard, I have remained involved with the School and I also have close ties with EPFL,” said Bertarelli. “I thought it would be an interesting idea to bring both faculties together to join forces in common projects, where each entity could contribute with its own core competences, the neuroengineering developments for EPFL and the experience in medical application to patients for HMS. This project once again shows that Europe and America can collaborate to have a very competitive impact in the advancement of science,” he added.last_img read more

Alcohol misuse leads to ER

first_imgAt least 10 ambulances have responded to alcohol-related incidents on Notre Dame’s campus so far this semester, according to Notre Dame Security Police (NDSP). NDSP Director Phil Johnson said extreme intoxication should not be taken lightly. “Sometimes a student sees another student drink too much,” Johnson said. “Putting them to bed can be a very dangerous idea … You can’t simply put someone to bed who is intoxicated who might aspirate and stop breathing.” In 2010-2011, Johnson said ambulances transported individuals to the hospital for alcohol poisoning on 78 occasions. The prior school year, NDSP reported 76 alcohol-related dispatches for ambulances, and from 2008-2009, 71. At one of two local hospitals, students can receive treatment ranging from rehydration to stomach pumping for alcohol poisoning. Johnson said these statistics include both Notre Dame students and visitors to campus. Football weekends increase the risk of excessive intoxication on campus, Johnson said, and more alcohol-related trips to the hospital occur during the fall semester. “During the fall we often see an uptick, definitely an uptick on Saturdays [for football weekends],” Johnson said. Emergency medical responders need to evaluate a number of factors when they deal with a student who is extremely intoxicated. Johnson said an EMT will evaluate a patient’s level of responsiveness, general medical history, ability to speak and stand, blood alcohol content (BAC) and other factors. “From a first response standpoint, we make sure we get appropriate medical care to someone who needs it,” he said. In over 20 years with NDSP, Johnson said both law enforcement and campus officials have become more proactive about alcohol education. “I think now that we are more keenly aware of the perils of alcohol with an overdose, we are operating with more caution,” Johnson said. Some students are reluctant to call an ambulance for an underage friend in danger because they are afraid of disciplinary consequences for that person or for themselves, Johnson said. But he said discipline is far from the minds of emergency responders. “We’re trying to make sure people are safe and are getting the best care when presented with a potentially life-threatening situation,” he said. “Call 9-1-1, and take care of the person. Life safety comes first.” Kathleen O’Leary, director of Residence Life for the Office of Student Affairs, agreed with Johnson. “When a friend has consumed alcohol and you are concerned about their well-being, always contact hall staff or NDSP at 9-1-1 for medical assistance,” O’Leary said. “Leaving a friend to ‘sleep it off’ is extremely dangerous … While the University does not currently have a medical amnesty policy, the surrounding circumstances of an alleged violation of University policy are always taken into consideration.” O’Leary’s office handles discipline cases for students who are taken to the hospital for excessive drinking. “When addressing instances of severe intoxication, our office’s primary concern is for that student’s physical, emotional and spiritual health and well-being,” O’Leary said. “Students will meet with us to go through the disciplinary process, which we intend to be an educational one.” The disciplinary process is a chance to have “an educational conversation” about decision-making, as well as the University’s expectations and policies regarding alcohol possession and consumption. O’Leary said students could also receive alcohol assessment and education through the Office of Alcohol and Drug Education. “If the Office of Residence Life determines that a student is responsible for a violation of University policy, the nature of the offense and the circumstances surrounding it, the student’s prior disciplinary violations — if any — the impact of the misconduct on the community and prior similar cases will be among the factors considered in determining a sanction,” O’Leary said. According to du Lac, this sanction could include alcohol counseling, loss of on-campus parking and driving privileges, community service and disciplinary probation, among other punishments. Christine Nowak, director of the Office of Alcohol and Drug Education, said her office exists to educate students about the consequences of alcohol abuse. “We are student-friendly, student-driven and educational,” Nowak said. “We’re not a part of discipline, not a counseling office and not the police. We are giving students the power to make better decisions.” Excessive drinking is a problem on most college campuses, Nowak said. “There’s a progression, and at the far end of that progression is alcohol poisoning, sexual assault and property damage,” Nowak said. “The biggest change has to happen at the student level with students positively confronting other students … This is a safety concern and a health concern.” While some students might shy away from these conversations, Nowak said expressing concern about dangerous drinking habits to a friend is important. “For some folks, that’s all they need to hear from a friend,” Nowak said. “I have great faith that students can change the culture if they want to and make it safe and healthy for everyone … A lot of people have a social life without alcohol.”last_img read more

UNEP: 638GW of solar capacity installed worldwide in past 10 years

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享PV Tech:Solar PV has seen a “meteoric rise” over the past decade, with more capacity installed than any other power source, according to a new report by BloombergNEF and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP).Over the last ten years, 638GW of solar PV was installed globally – a dramatic turn of events for a power source only boasting 25GW at the close of 2009. Solar reaped more capacity investment than any other renewable technology over the decade, at US$1.3 trillion. That’s half of the overall US$2.6 trillion invested in renewables – excluding large hydro – over the same period.Solar’s ascendancy has been accompanied by a “precipitous drop” of the levelised cost of the technology, the report notes. The cost of solar technology has tumbled 81% over ten years, from US$304 to US$57 per MWh.Over the decade, China has sunk US$758 billion into renewables capacity, followed by the US (US$356 billion) and Japan (US$202 billion). Europe has invested US$698 billion in total, with Germany and the UK leading the pack at US$179 billion and US$122 billion respectively.Renewables now account for 26.3% of all electricity produced, or 12.9% if large hydro is excluded.In 2018, solar deployments accounted for more than half of total renewables additions (excluding large-scale hydro), at 108GW of an overall 167GW. The technology also attracted the most investment, at US$133.5 billion. Investment in renewables capacity was roughly three times larger than global investment in coal and gas-fired power in 2018.More: UNEP: Solar the star of a decade of ‘incredible’ renewables momentum UNEP: 638GW of solar capacity installed worldwide in past 10 yearslast_img read more

Lynbrook Couple Found Dead in Suicide Probe

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A Lynbrook couple was found dead Thursday morning in what appears to be a natural cause death and a suicide. (Long Island Press)An elderly man and woman married 20 years were both found dead Thursday morning inside their Lynbrook home, Nassau County police said.“At this time it appears to be a natural cause death and a suicide,” Nassau County police spokesman Det. Vincent Garcia told reporters at the scene.Police did not immediately release their names.The 73-year-old woman is believed to have died of natural causes, pending autopsy results, police said. It appears that her 70-year-old husband died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound from a shotgun.The couple was discovered after a home health care aid arrived at the house but was unable to get inside the locked door, Garcia said. The health care aid called the family and someone came by with a key to open the door when the discovery was made and a witness called 911 shortly before 10 a.m., police said.The woman was found on a bed, police said, and her husband’s body was discovered nearby.Officials said Nassau County District Attorney Kathleen Rice and an employee were at the scene. A spokesman for Rice’s office said the incident involved a relative of an employee of the district attorney’s office.last_img read more

The right mindset for failure

first_img continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr People in leadership positions have high expectations for themselves and their employees. In the same vein as being reluctant to ask for help, we avoid failure. Failure means we didn’t succeed. It hints at a lack of effort or competence, even though that’s not usually the case.But perfection is unrealistic and unachievable. All of us have experienced some sort of failure in our careers – whether it was not getting a job we applied for, not seeing the expected level of engagement in a new campaign, or not meeting an annual goal.A recent post on The Powerful Mind blog outlines six reasons why failure is good for us:You learned something. After failure, it’s important to reflect on the entire process to understand what went wrong and how you can address similar situations in the future more successfully.last_img read more

Volunteers needed for ‘Fifth Annual Drawing Marathon’ at Binghamton University

first_imgA cash prize of $1000 and $500 will be given out on Feb. 29. The $1000 “jury prize” will be awarded by three jurors and the $500 “people’s prize” will be awarded on “the basis of qualitative comments received by the visitors” at the marathon as well as the university’s Facebook page. In addition to this, the school would like applicants to answer the following questions in their application email: Applicants must sign up before Feb. 10. No applications will be accepted after this date. VESTAL (WBNG) — Binghamton University is looking for artists to participate in its 24-hour-drawing marathon. The university’s “Fifth Annual Drawing Marathon” is a free event that is open to attendees ages 18 and over. Artists will draw a model for a 24-hour period with a limited amount of breaks. The school asks applicants to send their information including: name. address, phone number and email. They should also include a PDF of 10 sample drawings.center_img The drawing marathon will take place 10 a.m. Feb 28 to 10 a.m. Feb. 29 in the Binghamton University art Museum. Those looking to apply should email their applications to [email protected] The school says it needs 10 to 12 volunteers to participate. Any alumni, student or community member aged 18 or older may sign up. Are you comfortable with media (video and photography) documenting you and your artwork if selected?Do you have an interesting story, a personal challenge you’ve overcome, or anything special we should be made aware of?last_img read more

A Eurowings plane flies painted in the colors of Kvarner

first_imgIn addition to the new airlines at Rijeka Airport, there will also be new airlines from 2018: Condor and Transavia, and a significant increase in the route for Eindhoven by Transavia has been announced (an increase of over 300%)Photo: Rijeka Airport Photo: Rijeka Airport Stickers promoting Kvarner were affixed to a Eurowings aircraft flying from Dusseldorf to Gran Canaria, Budapest, Zurich, London, Hamburg, Dresden, Lanzarote, Pristina, Berlin, Manchester, Newcastle and Rome.A Eurowings aircraft with Kvarner features will promote Kvarner until November 15, 2019.center_img This year, Rijeka Airport achieved all historical records. Thus, the turnover of over 180 thousand passengers and over 5 thousand operations was realized. For the next season, 3 new airlines have already been confirmed – TUI at the destinations of Manchester and London, Volotea at the destination for Marseille, and Lufthansa at the destination for Munich.last_img read more

Australia to deploy armed forces in coronavirus compliance battle

first_imgAustralia has already closed its borders to everyone but Australian citizens or residents returning home. Those returnees will now be detained in a hotel for two weeks, rather than trusted to go home and self-isolate.The Australian Defense Force (ADF) will be sent out to check recent returnees are complying with the previous order to self-isolate at their home for the same period of time, a rare step in a country where the military is not often seen on the streets.”The ADF will be there to put boots on the ground,” Morrison said.The rate of infections across Australia remains much slower than in many other countries, but officials are concerned that the number of cases has accelerated over the past week, particularly in the most populated states of New South Wales (NSW) and Victoria. There have been 13 deaths nationally. Australia is introducing enforced quarantine by midnight on Saturday for citizens returning home from overseas and will deploy the armed forces to ensure people already subjected to self-isolation measures are complying.Prime Minister Scott Morrison said on Friday that returning Australians accounted for around two thirds of the country’s more than 3,000 coronavirus cases, making it the “biggest issue” to be addressed in the country’s fight against the pandemic.”As time has gone on, the risk of those who are returning from other parts of the world actually increases,” Morrison said in a televised briefing. Despite the relatively low numbers, there has been frustration and anger over contradictory guidance from the federal government, state legislators and health officials in recent days over the necessary level of social distancing.At the same media conference where Morrison announced returning Australians as the No. 1 issue to tackle, Australia’s chief medical officer Brendan Murphy said the priority from a health perspective was preventing any potential spike in local transmissions.”We’re not kidding ourselves – if community transmission becomes significant, that is the real serious concern,” Murphy said. “That’s why these social distancing measures are just so important.”That has been a particularly thorny issue for Morrison’s government, which has said that schools should remain open and has so far backed away from the more sweeping lockdowns on public movement seen in Europe.The leaders of NSW and Victoria state have both said they are ready to push ahead with tighter curbs when – rather than if – they become necessary.”We will get to a point where we need to do more,” Victoria Premier Daniel Andrews said after Morrison spoke.Andrews said measures like the enforced quarantine for returning travellers were a “big step to take away someone’s liberty … but this is life and death. There is too much at stake to do otherwise.”Cruise ship concerns Cruise ships have become a flashpoint in Australia after almost 200 of 2,700 passengers who were allowed to disembark from Carnival Corp’s Ruby Princess in Sydney a week ago later tested positive for COVID-19.Murphy noted on Friday that case numbers had “not been helped by a recent cruise ship”. The blunder sparked widespread anger, a blame game between state and federal authorities, and tighter scrutiny of cruise ships still in Australian waters.One liner off the west coast, the German-owned MV Artania, was permitted to dock on Friday morning after a medical emergency on board. Seven passengers have tested positive for COVID-19, with one now in hospital in a critical condition.Western Australia state Premier Mark McGowan said arrangements were being made for around 800 remaining passengers to be transferred to waiting planes for charter flights to Germany, the home country of the bulk of the tourists.Australian passengers on board a second cruise ship in Western Australian waters, the Vasco da Gama, will be quarantined on the former prison island turned tourist destination of Rottnest island from Monday. Other passengers will be flown home. center_img Topics :last_img read more

US says IMF economic outlook too pessimistic

first_imgHe faulted the IMF for veering into social issues, saying “this dynamic detracts from the usefulness and impact of the report.””Economies are neither made nor remade but emerge from millions of citizens’ independent decisions, and dirigisme runs contrary to the spirit of free enterprise that undergirds the US economy,” he said in a statement included in the full report.In the initial summary released July 17, the IMF staff predicted a 6.6 percent contraction of American GDP this year compared to 2019, and 3.9 percent growth in 2021, but Rosen called that “too pessimistic.””Given a high degree of uncertainty, we do not place much confidence in point estimates of GDP growth,” he said, adding that the fund’s analysis possibly “assumed limited additional stimulus.”However, the White House and Congress have not been able to bridge their differences over the size and structure of a new emergency spending bill, and President Donald Trump over the weekend announced limited measures to bridge the gap and try to put pressure on Democratic leaders to come to the table.Rosen, who also rejected the IMF critique of Trump administration trade policy, said the US government believes the recovery will pick up speed as states reopen.But many states, facing surging COVID-19 cases, have been forced to impose restrictions, while schools in many districts are struggling to reopen safely.Topics : The IMF is too gloomy in its outlook for US growth and oversteps its mandate in calling for Washington to reshape the American economy, a US official said Monday.In its annual review of the US economy, the fund said Washington has the financial firepower to fix the health care system, better support poor families with improved aid programs and tax credits, and improve jobless benefits to include self-employed workers.Mark Rosen, US representative to the fund’s board, said he agrees the government has ample resources available to deal with the pandemic. “Our authorities disagree, however, that they should use available fiscal space to ‘broadly remake’ the US economy.”last_img read more

Tocardo to retrieve floating tidal platform from EMEC

first_imgTocardo’s TFS system off Orkney (Photo: Tocardo) Tocardo Tidal Power plans to retrieve its Temporary Foundation System (TFS) floating tidal platform equipped with T2 tidal turbine from the European Marine Energy Centre (EMEC).Orkney-based marine services provider Leask Marine has been engaged to tow the TFS from EMEC’s Fall of Warness test site to Isbister Bay.The device will be moored there until shore operations are ready for recovery, according to Leask Marine.The temporary mooring is set to last from November 6 until December 31, 2017.To remind, Tocardo signed up to demonstrate a 20 year pre-commercial array at EMEC’s Fall of Warness tidal energy test site in February 2016.Tocardo plans to install eight T2 turbines across two Tocardo systems. The planned array at EMEC is the next step in Tocardo’s path towards commercializing their tidal turbine by proving and validating the technology in the volatile offshore environment in Orkney for an extended time period.The first T2 turbine was installed at EMEC this March as part of a Temporary Foundation System (TFS).last_img read more