Dell EMC Hybrid Cloud Advances to be Main Attraction at VMworld 2017

first_imgIn a perfect digitally transformed world, every application workload would instantly know where best to deploy itself. No one on the IT staff would ever have to spend time optimizing the performance of those workloads or worrying where they are running at any given moment. As great as that all sounds every IT professional attending the VMworld 2017 conference this month knows all too well that application workloads are not going to manage themselves any time soon. What IT professionals can count on is the fact that application workloads and the IT infrastructure on which they depend are becoming acutely more intelligent with each passing day.IT professionals today routinely get asked to manage workloads that are anywhere from a few decades old to literally being born of the cloud in that last few minutes. Some of those workloads need to run on a public cloud. But the clear majority of those workloads will continue to be deployed in traditional on-premises data center environments now and well into the future. The real challenge going forward will be managing those workloads as they migrate across hybrid cloud computing environments that will soon be the de-facto standard across the enterprise.At the Dell EMC booth #400 we will be showcasing new additions to our Enterprise Hybrid Cloud and Native Hybrid Cloud platforms as well as updates on our HCI portfolio. In addition to the Dell EMC experts staffing the booth, there will no shortage of vBrownBag TechTalks and Hands-on Labs!Of course, the inimitable Chad Sakac, president of the Dell EMC Converged Platform and Solutions Division (CSPD), will provide his unique perspective on the ‘the State of the Union’ within Dell EMC with a special focus on multi-cloud, converged and hyper-converged platforms during a breakout session on August 30 from 8:30 – 9:30 a.m. That will be preceded by an ‘Ask Chad’ session at the Dell EMC booth during which customers and partners will be invited to ask Chad questions on Monday, August 28 between 2:30 – 3:30 p.m.In addition, you should make time to visit the HCI Room to see why VxRail systems are the fastest growing product line in our history.Finally, don’t miss a chance to hear from your peers during our CONVERGED meetup Monday, August 28 from 3-5:30 p.m., at StripSteak in Mandalay Bay. The highlight of this session will be a customer panel of VxRail and EHC/NHC customers moderated by CPSD’s head of marketing, Bob Wambach, Chad Sakac and VMWare’s head of Dell Technologies solutions, Iain Mulholland.Naturally, no conference experience is complete without the opportunity to take home some cool swag. In the HCI Room you’ll discover a new HCI Hero interactive video game along with some awesome VxRail swag. In the VxRail’s escape room you’ll find the The Great Xscape – a physical experience that challenges participants to complete thee puzzles in less than 10 minutes to escape the room. The group with the best time of the day will win Dell laptops! For those that arrive early enough we also encourage you to participate in the 9th annual v0dgeball tourney on Sunday, August 29 at 3:00 p.m. to benefit the Wounded Warriors charity.The unifying theme of all these events is VMware, which now sets the bar for what hybrid cloud computing in the enterprise should really be. Personally, I’m looking forward to seeing how the latest version of the VMware vRealize automation framework injects a massive amount of intelligence into the management of hybrid clouds. That capability makes public clouds hosting instances of VMware an almost seamless extension of any on-premises IT environment.We are also excited to show you how the latest generation of NVMe-based VxRack systems are redefining the economics of hybrid cloud computing. Contrary to popular opinion it’s now much more cost effective to run certain classes of long-running workloads in an on-premises IT environment. In fact, a recent Cloud Price Index report published by 451 Research notes that anything involving more than 400 virtual machines is less expensive to deploy on-premises. Obviously, public clouds will continue to play an important role in IT. But we believe it has been conclusively proven that the future of enterprise IT will revolve around hybrid clouds built on top of robust pre-integrated IT infrastructure such as our Dell EMC Blocks, Racks and Appliances that are designed from the ground up to achieve unparalleled levels of scale.If you can’t make it out to Las Vegas this month, be sure to try and attend VMworld 2017 conference in Barcelona next month. Whether we are in the desert or on the shores of the Mediterranean we know there really is no substitute for a hands-on experience when it comes to seeing and believing in the future of hybrid cloud computing.last_img read more

Helder Guimaraes’ Verso to Close Off-Broadway

first_imgHelder Guimarães in ‘Verso'(Photo: Joan Marcus) Show Closed This production ended its run on Nov. 27, 2016 Verso Verso, acclaimed magician Helder Guimarães’ latest act, will shutter off-Broadway on November 27. Performances began on September 19 at New World Stages, with the production officially opening on September 28.Verso, directed by Rodrigo Santos, premiered earlier this year at the Teatro do Bolhão in Porto, Portugal. The show promises to push the limits of magic and challenge just how much audiences are willing to believe what they see.In 2006, a 23-year-old Guimarães became the youngest magician to be awarded the title World Champion of Card Magic. He went on to be named Parlour Magician of the Year in 2011 and 2012 by the Academy of Magical Arts. Guimarães uses his background in theater to develop magic shows, including Nothing to Hide (which he co-created with Derek DelGaudio) and Borrowed Time.Broadway.com customers with tickets to canceled performances will be contacted with information on refunds or exchanges.center_img Related Shows View Commentslast_img read more

Propagate your landscape

first_imgWhen I first moved into my current home 15 years ago, the farm house in the pasture was completely void of any landscaping. I instantly fell in love with the rural paradise, but I had my work cut out to get the vacant landscape looking good.Having spent most of the budget on the 40 acres and house, there was not much left for the landscape. I decided that if I couldn’t afford an instant landscape, I would be patient and grow my own plants through propagation.Propagation can be a wonderful way to acquire new plants at a fraction of the cost of container-grown shrubs.With the small amount of money I had left from the home purchase, I invested in materials to build a small greenhouse. I put together a 12′ x 12′ structure to house my propagated seeds and cuttings. The addition of a crude misting system, ventilation and heating has allowed me to produce 80 percent of my landscape. While my mini-greenhouse has been helpful, you don’t necessarily need one to propagate your own plants.There are many forms of plant duplication including seeding, dividing, layering, grafting and taking cuttings. Taking cuttings can be one of the easiest ways to propagate new shrubs. While many plants can be successfully propagated through cuttings, some may be difficult or impossible to reproduce through this method. Pine species, cedar, redbud, gingko, laurels, Southern magnolia, dogwood and most common shade trees such as oak, elm, pecan and hickory can be a real challenge to grow from cuttings.Taking cuttingsCuttings collected in early summer are called softwood cuttings. Those collected in winter are called hardwood cuttings. Softwood cuttings are taken from the current season’s new growth. Select softwood cuttings in June, July and August.Take cuttings from healthy, disease-free shoots near the top of the plant. The trick is to find new wood that has not fully matured, yet is not too tender. Cuttings should be 4 to 6 inches long. Make a smooth slanting cut with a sharp knife. Cuttings will be inserted 1 to 2 inches deep in the rooting medium, so remove the leaves on the lower half of the stem. Be sure to leave 50 percent of the leaves at the top to manufacture food for the cutting.Dormant or hardwood cuttings are collected the same way, but the cuttings are taken during the winter months. First-time propagators will likely have more success with softwood cuttings.Almost all cuttings respond better when dipped in artificial rooting hormones, which are available at most nurseries as powders, liquids or gels. These hormones will encourage successful rooting.Rooting mediaCuttings are only as good as the soil they have to grow in. Start with a good, sterile medium. A general mix would be half peat moss and half perlite. Ground pine bark is also excellent when mixed with equal parts of perlite. Some folks have had success growing cuttings in pure vermiculite, a soil-less medium that absorbs water yet provides good aeration due to its particle size.Do not use garden soil as a propagation medium. It is too heavy and can contain diseases.Cutting careThe most common cause of failure in cutting propagation is uneven moisture. Never allow the propagation medium to dry out or become waterlogged. Keep relatively high humidity around the leaves at all times. Commercially-made mini-greenhouses are available, or you can make one yourself with wire and plastic to create a humid environment. These structures can range in size from a few feet to something as large as a dog house or bigger. A frame built of wood and plastic can also protect rooted plants in winter.Cuttings housed under plastic need water only once a week. Don’t add any kind of fertilizer to the medium until the cuttings have rooted.After the cuttings have produced a root system 1 inch long, transplant them into a soil mixture in individual pots. Most cuttings form adequate root systems in one to three months. A good soil mixture for potted plants is one-third peat moss, one-third sand and one-third top soil.Use a slow-release fertilizer in container plants and closely monitor water needs. Plants may need to root-out in containers for up to two years before being ready to transplant in the landscape. Some vigorous-growing plants may be ready to plant after one season in the container.While it takes time and effort, it can be satisfying to grow your own landscape. The possibilities are endless and the money you save can help you purchase better propagating structures. Once you get the hang of propagation, it will be hard to walk past plants in other landscapes without sneaking a cutting into your pocket.last_img read more

The Long Road: Epic Blue Ridge Cycling Rides

first_imgPhoto: Richmond MultisportsPut the fun between your legs. August means cycling season is heating up, so get in gear for the long haul.Tour De Lions Ashland, Va. – August 20Cyclists start in the quaint town of Ashland and pedal through the scenic, gently rolling country roads just north of bustling Richmond in Hanover County. Just right for a variety of levels, the ride includes routes of 30, 50, 75, and 100 miles.tourdelion.webs.comWNC Villainous ViperAsheville, N.C. – September 10Both the century and metric century options of the Villainous Viper climb Town Mountain before a rolling stint on the Blue Ridge Parkway and a screeching descent of Ox Creek Road. Century riders circle the entire city, including a tough final stretch up Cravens Gap before dropping back into town.wncvillainousviper.orgBack Roads CenturyBerryville, Va. – September 18Courses of 100, 65, 50, 30 and 25 miles wind through friendly towns and at times parallel a scenic stretch of the Shenandoah River.  Elevation on each course is relatively moderate, as the full century has approximately 4,500 feet of climbing.backroadscentury.orgBridge to Bridge Incredible ChallengeLenoir, N.C. – September 18If you’re ready to huff it in the High Country, try this lung-busting ride from Lenoir to the top of Grandfather Mountain. Known as one of the toughest cycling rides in the country, the course climbs 10,528 feet—almost all of it in the last 40 miles. Riders move through the Yadkin Valley to some of steepest sections of the Blue Ridge Parkway, before a final brutal ascent to Grandfather’s famous Mile High Swinging Bridge.b2bride.weebly.comHilly HellaciousAsheville, N.C. – September 25In the full century, sadistic cyclists spin their wheels over 8,000 feet of grueling climbs and winding mountain roads around Lake Lure before looping back through the Henderson County countryside. The big killer here is the rigorous ascent of Bearwallow Mountain. A metric century is also offered.hillyhellacious.comSix Gap Century Ride Dahlonega, Ga. – September 25This challenging route takes riders up and down six of the steepest climbs in the North Georgia Mountains, with more than 10,700 feet of vertical climbing over the 100-mile course. The ride’s hardest climb at Hogpen Gap can break the will of even the toughest riders, with sections as steep as 15 percent. A three-gap half ride is also offered.cyclenorthgeorgia.comBeach Century Bike Tour Virginia Beach, Va. – October 1Flat seaside roads and crisply mild temperatures will be what to expect at the Beach Century Bike Tour, which starts in Virginia Beach and winds past the rural marshlands of the Commonwealth’s southeastern coast. This fall ride has 100-, 50-, and 33-mile options.beachcenturytour.com Gran Fondo of the Alleghenies Sheffield, Pa. – October 9Wind through Pennsylvania’s Allegheny National Forest at the height of foliage season. This colorful fall is perfect for cycling newbies looking to build mileage without a ton of elevation gain. The rural ride starting from the small town of Sheffield includes routes of 30, 60, and 100 miles with the longest ride only gaining 3,500 feet.warrenadventures.com First Century TipsFormer pro racer and current cycling coach Ashley Powell of Greensboro, N.C.-based Catup.com Coaching Services offers essential tips to finish your first century.Proper hydration starts days before your rideSeveral days before the event drink consistently, so your urine is light yellow. It shouldn’t be too dark or too clear.Bring fluid in an insulated water bottle or hydration packOtherwise, potentially sweltering Southern temps will turn your drink of choice into hot liquid miles before the next aid station.Wear familiar clothes and gear Your ride day is not the time to break in a new pair of shoes or shorts that can cause unexpected discomfort.You can loosen your shoes   “Some riders think numb feet are just a part of cycling, but they’re not,” says Powell. “Especially in the summer heat, it’s important that feet have proper circulation.”Don’t set lofty goals that will only add stress   Many new riders burn out from trying to maintain an unachievable pace. Knowing your limits comes from experience. “The first time should be about the experience,” says Powell. “It’s fine to have goals, but cycling has too many variables that leave many ambitious new riders disappointed and frustrated.”last_img read more

What’s the definition of adventuring?

first_imgSummer at Snowshoe might just be the quintessential definition of adventuring. A chance to increase your vocabulary, as you stockpile new skills and thrills. A place where hiking-boot-mornings turn to bikini-afternoons, fishing flies are chosen as wisely  as swinging clubs, and the thirst for gravity and velocity never goes unquenched. Where a perfectly banked downhill mountain bike line is worshiped as much as a perfectly seared scallop. And where every day is an invitation for more adventure, and more sticky memories. Welcome to summer on the Mountain. Visit us at snowshoemtn.comlast_img

Skurka Says – A Southerner’s Guide to Gearing Up for Winter

first_imgI’m not totally sure I’d be around to write this now if, before setting out on a backpacking trip last January, I hadn’t recently binge-listened to survival podcasts. The message repeated during each episode in ominous, Rod Serling-like tones: it’s seldom one poor choice that leads to wilderness tragedy but a whole series of compounding follies.Heading out underprepared had been my first bad decision. Continuing on by way of the steep, snowy, icy, boulder-strewn trail in the Mountain Bridge Wilderness Area looked a lot like bad decision #2, which would inevitably lead to #3 and #4 and the kind of fix that ends in hospitals or cemeteries. By contrast, admitting I’d been defeated by a winter storm in, of all places, South Carolina, didn’t seem like such a great tragedy.So I hiked to the nearest highway and hitched a ride, correctly trusting that drivers out in such weather would be proud enough of their vehicles and hardy spirit to gladly help a hiker in need. (Thank you, Seth, of Greenville.) Soon enough, I was home in front of a roasting-hot wood stove, leafing through a book I should have reviewed more thoroughly before I left—Andrew Skurka’s The Ultimate Hiker’s Gear Guide—and trying to figure out what I did wrong.Skurka is the perfect advisor to help us efficiently and economically adjust for winter trips. He’s completed as many epic treks as any hiker in the country, and my well-thumbed copy has informed not only my equipment choices but my overall approach to backpacking. Not minimalist, exactly, but definitely no-nonsense. After rereading relevant passages of his book and taking in his emailed response to my questions, I saw how easily the trip I’d had could have become the trip I should have had.Footwear. Skurka is less about promoting stuff hikers need than about the expensive—and heavy—stuff they think they need but don’t. And no item of conventional gear attracts more of Skurka’s scorn than the good old hiking boot. Trail running shoes dry quickly and provide plenty of support at half the weight. The claimed moisture protection of boots, either from leather treatments or so-called waterproof liners, is overstated and temporary.At least, for most of the year. But in winter, the freezing rain and thin blanket of snow that fell overnight on my trip was enough to soak my feet and benumb my toes. If I’d read my guide more carefully, I would have noticed that trail shoes are strictly a three-season recommendation. Skurka wrote me that in winter he wears ankle-height boots lined with Gore-Tex, which provides sufficient moisture protection from dry snow.Sleeping bag. The second-most glaring gear deficiency, my bag, is optimistically touted as suitable for three seasons. Three seasons where? I asked myself, looking at its alarming flatness on the floor of my tent. Florida, maybe. I bundled up in every layer of wool and synthetic fiber clothing I had brought—one of the few things I did right, Skurka wrote. This kept me warm enough, barely, and only because the temperatures didn’t really start to fall until after daybreak. But I lay awake most of the night worrying that they would, which gets to one of the real values of a good sleeping bag—security. It should be, along with a good shelter and a set of warm, dry sleeping clothes, a guaranteed refuge even in the coldest weather. In our part of the country, that means a “comfort” rating of 20 degrees Fahrenheit, Skurka wrote in an email, which typically translates to a standard temperature rating about a dozen degrees lower. It’s the most expensive upgrade; winter bags usually mean down, and ones meeting Skurka’s recommendations start at more than $200, while premium brands employing the highest loft down can cost twice that amount. But even that’s not so much, really, for comfort of body and mind.Shelter. Like Skurka, I prefer tarps, and my standard rig, including guy lines, weighs in at little more than a pound. But, like a lot of other backpackers, I couldn’t quite resist the idea that a tent would be a cozy winter alternative. Unfortunately, mine is an old three-person Kelty, bought when my kids were small. It wasn’t until I’d returned that I put it on a scale and realized the horrifying penalty it had extracted; it weighed in at nearly 8 pounds, or about three times as much as a good down bag. Go ahead and use tarps in winter, Skurka wrote in an email, though it’s “best to have a full-sided model, to minimize drafts.” If not, pitch it so the sides protect from the wind. And if you have a choice—which you don’t in places such as Mountain Bridge, which requires reserved sites—camp low in breezy conditions and high when the air is still and cold settles.Stoves. Another thing I almost did right: I chose my butane canister stove over the homemade cat food  can alcohol burner that I’d adopted as my go-to heat source on Skurka’s recommendation. The relatively lux meal I thought I’d need at the end of a long day of winter hiking, Kraft Velveeta & Shells, required longer cooking time than standard backpacking fare. And I couldn’t imagine morning without coffee, which meant boiling not one but two pots of water. Skurka makes the same concession, but reminded me of a lesson I’d already learned from my trouble firing up my stove in the morning: because gas stays liquid in cold weather, you need to sleep with it in the foot of your bag.Route. This has nothing to do with gear and everything to do with common sense. No matter how smart you pack, your burden will be heavier in winter than in summer. Stream crossings will take longer because of the care needed to prevent soaking boots and socks. Sections of trail that you normally cruise through can bring you almost to standstill. So, pick shorter routes, especially because in winter you will likely have even well-traveled trails all to yourself.Lessons learned—the hard way.last_img read more

5 cybersecurity strategies from the White House

first_imgOctober marks the 12th annual National Cybersecurity Awareness Month.  This is an initiative sponsored by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security in cooperation with the National Cyber Security Alliance and the Multi-State Information Sharing and Analysis Center.  And one former White House CIO has some information to share with you: She says that defensive strategies stop just one-third of threats and you should go “Go on the Cybersecurity Offensive.”You’ve been thinking about cybersecurity all wrong, says Theresa Payton, former White House chief information officer (CIO) under President George W. Bush.“That’s not your fault,” says Payton, who delivered a keynote address at the CUNA Technology Council and Operations, Sales & Service Council Conferences in Orlando, Fla. “You were told to create these firewalls and install antivirus software and hunker down behind that. That isn’t going to work. You need to go on offense.”Defensive systems simply can’t keep up with the legion of cybercriminals who release a new deviant of malware into the wild every 90 seconds, Payton says. Their coding acumen and technology allow them to quickly detect and circumvent obstacles in antivirus and antimalware software simply by changing a line of code.Theresa Payton “These systems only block about one-third of all the bad things out there,” says Payton, founder/CEO of Fortalice Solutions and co-founder of Dark Cubed, and a member of two military-oriented credit unions. “That’s why it’s so important for you to have an offensive strategy.” continue reading » 10SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

How will you feel at the funeral of your co-worker, boss, or direct report?

first_img 19SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Amy Downs In addition to being the CEO of Allegiance Credit Union, Amy also speaks on the importance of resisting complacency.  Amy survived the 1995 OKC bombing and later transformed her life … Details Back in 1995, I was a young 28 year old and didn’t think it was appropriate to give the boss a compliment. People who do something like that earn a title that has something to do with the color of their nose. You just don’t do that. Or so I thought, before sitting at Vicky Texter’s funeral wishing so badly that I had told her exactly how much I admired her. I wish she knew the positive way her leadership had impacted my life. I wish she knew how much confidence I had gained working under her supervision.My boss’s funeral wasn’t the only one I attended that year. I had to deal with the deaths of 18 of my 33 co-workers. I never told them how much they meant to me. Our Credit Union, Federal Employees Credit Union, was in the Alfred P. Murrah building which was blown up in an act of domestic terrorism on April 19, 1995. Granted, this situation was extreme but eventually the odds are great you will one day attend the funeral of someone you worked with.We often spend more time with our co-workers than we do our own families. Even though we are professionals and may not be “friends” outside of the office, does this mean it isn’t okay to occasionally let your co-workers know that you care about them? Why shouldn’t we tell our boss they are amazing (if they are)?Many things changed for me after April 19, 1995. One of them is that I tell my work family how I feel about them. I never want to sit at a funeral again with regret for words unsaid. Whether we like it or not, we are not just “co-workers”, we are emotional beings who on are a journey connected together by an industry focused on helping people. In the words of the Pointer Sisters, “We Are Family”.For me, this means occasionally sending downright sappy emails to let others know the positive way they have impacted my life. Even board members. Call my nose any color you want.Would you feel regret for words unsaid if you were sitting at the funeral of your boss, co-worker, or direct report right now? If so, do something about it.last_img read more

Oxford Street confidence on the wane

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Benchmark says Yes in Mayfair

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img