Moon River Music Festival Announces 2019 Lineup: Jason Isbell, Brandi Carlile, More

first_imgToday, Moon River Music Festival and host band Drew Holcomb & The Neighbors have announced the lineup for their 2019 event, set to take place in Chattanooga, TN on September 7th and 8th.Leading the charge at Moon River will be headliners Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit and Brandi Carlile. In addition, the event will include performances from Goodbye Road (featuring Drew Holcomb & The Neighbors, Johnnyswim, and Penny & Sparrow), St. Paul & The Broken Bones, Moon Taxi, Drew & Ellie Holcomb, The Wood Brothers, Johnnyswim, Josh Ritter, The Oh Hellos, The Lone Bellow, Joy Williams, Rayland Baxter, The Band Camino, Sister Sparrow & The Dirty Birds, The Suffers, and more.Previous buyer pre-sale tickets for Moon River Music Festival 2019 will go on sale tomorrow, Tuesday, February 12th, at 10 a.m. EST, or while supplies last. General on-sale will begin on Wednesday, February 13th at 10 a.m. EST. For more information, head to the festival website here.last_img read more

Hate draws a forceful response

first_imgOn Aug. 5, 2012, a white supremacist walked into a Sikh temple in Oak Creek, Wisc., and started shooting. The resulting casualties ― the gunman killed six people and wounded four before dying of a self-inflicted wound ― made the attack, at the time, the worst hate crime in America (the shooting in Charleston, S.C., last year would claim more victims). That the response by the small Wisconsin city was not one of vengeance or retribution, but of reconciliation and a search for greater understanding, has been described as testament not only to the resilience of Oak Creek but to the better nature of the nation as a whole.The story of that horror, and the healing that came after, is the focus of a short documentary, “Waking in Oak Creek,” which screened at the Brattle Theatre on Tuesday. The final installment of the Religion Refocused series, sponsored by the Pluralism Project at Harvard and made possible by support from Mass Humanities, the screening was aimed at bringing the conversation around the incident to Cambridge, as was a panel discussion afterward. Moderated by Diana Eck, director of the Pluralism Project and a professor of religion in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, the panel included the filmmaker, Patrice O’Neill, as well as community activists.“Waking in Oak Creek” opens with the 911 calls and incorporates police and news reports from the incident, the terror and chaos of which is made clear and personal in interviews with survivors. Family photos and film footage of the murder victims add to the poignancy, while interviews with Lt. Brian Murphy of the Oak Creek police, who was shot 15 times in the attack, illustrate the long road back for the wounded.But the emphasis in the film is on community action. Candlelight vigils united the city, including groups as diverse as the local American Legion, Christian churches, and Jewish synagogues, while testimony by Sikh temple members brought about legislation that clarified the status of Sikhs in federal hate crimes.O’Neill said that the 34-minute documentary, released in 2014, has been screened more than 3,000 times by community and police groups.,“This film is not about violence,” said O’Neill, a leader of the anti-bullying and anti-hate group Not in Our Town. “This film is about all the people … who can find a way to change and shift the culture that is becoming so toxic.”Explaining the film’s title, O’Neill quoted Pardeep Kaleka, who was also part of the panel. A former Milwaukee police officer, Kaleka, now a teacher, is the eldest son of Satwant Singh Kaleka, the murdered president of the Sikh temple.“We need to be awake,” O’Neill said, echoing Kaleka’s words in the film and citing the Sikh tenet of mindfulness and “relentless optimism” as the appropriate answer to hate.Panelist Arno Michaelis echoed that message. A former white supremacist, Michaelis co-founded the outreach organization Serve 2 Unite with Kaleka.“Belief that the world is basically good is the antidote to violence,” he said. Answering questions about his conversion, Michaelis recalled how various simple acts of friendship — a sandwich shared by an African-American co-worker, a job offer from a Jewish businessman ― ultimately guided him away from hate.Karin Firoza, the assistant director of the Center for Spirituality, Dialogue, and Service at Northeastern University, took the discussion into the Boston area, talking about her work with local youth.“There’s a lot of fear about being not only harmed but also discriminated against,” said Firoza, who is active with Boston’s Young Muslims Engaging, a high school group, and co-founded Roots & Wings Training and Consultation.For Kaleka, the trauma that he, his family, and his community suffered prompted a personal awakening, redirecting his life toward teaching and outreach. This was the message he came to share. “Every moment of fear, every moment of ignorance, is an opportunity,” he said. “Take every moment as an opportunity.”The 25th anniversary of the Pluralism Project will be celebrated during the opening of a special exhibit on Wednesday at 3 p.m. at Harvard Divinity School’s Andover-Harvard Theological Library. The celebration is open to the public and Professor Diana Eck will be on hand to provide remarks.last_img read more

Uncertain chapter in dental student’s life

first_imgThis is one in a series of profiles showcasing some of Harvard’s stellar graduates.On Dec. 20, Lindsay D’Amato woke up and put on her glasses. She was relieved when she could see normally. It told her the brain surgery had gone well.The surgery brought an end to a scary and uncertain chapter in D’Amato’s life, one that flipped her customary role of caring for others, and made her the one being cared for.Five months on, and D’Amato will graduate — on time — from the Harvard School of Dental Medicine (HSDM). Despite the fear and disruption caused by the tumor and subsequent surgery, D’Amato acknowledged that its timing was serendipitous: The surgery occurred right before winter break, giving her several weeks to recover.She wound up missing just three weeks of her community health externship at a community dental clinic, and was able to make up missed time over the ensuing weeks.Though her recovery went smoothly, it was not easy. The surgery left her with constant, severe headaches as the brain healed. Though nearly nonstop for the first three weeks of recovery, the pain has subsided, leaving the scar on the left side of her head the most prominent remaining reminder.The episode was the latest in what D’Amato called her “so weird” life. She grew up in St. Louis nurturing a budding interest in the sciences. Her high school AP biology and physics teachers had a particular influence on her and she went on to study biological engineering at the University of Missouri.Though contemplating a career in engineering after graduation, she was also attracted to the Peace Corps. She joined a civil engineering master’s degree program that combined a year of study at the University of California, Davis, with two years in the field doing hands-on water and sanitation work.After her year in California, D’Amato left for rural Panama, where she raised money and installed a solar-powered electric water pump in a community whose diesel pump only ran for 15 minutes a week because of the cost of fuel. She later coordinated with the Colorado nonprofit Bridges to Prosperity to put in a bridge so people heading to work and school could cross a nearby river that regularly swells in the rain.While in Panama, D’Amato began to reconsider engineering as a career. She realized that she liked interacting directly with people and began to think about other options, including dentistry, which an uncle with a private practice had recommended she consider. She applied to HSDM and was accepted, arriving in Boston in the fall of 2014.Once here, D’Amato immersed herself in her studies and in her clinical duties at the Harvard Dental Center and her externships. But she also found time to join the Crimson Care Collaborative and bring her dental skills to men held at the Nashua Street Jail in Boston. Dental care was badly needed there, she said, as the overwhelmed prison dentist mainly saw the most advanced cases: men in pain for whom care often involved extraction.“Lindsay was a delight to work with. Like many of the volunteers we’re lucky enough to have, she has a keen understanding of the social determinants of health and how incredibly vulnerable many of our patients are,” said Lisa Simon, a fellow in oral health and medicine integration and attending dentist of the jail and dentistry program. “It was really wonderful to watch her clinical skills and clinical confidence grow and to see her really connect with patients who may have had bad dental experiences in the past.”Aram Kim, instructor in restorative dentistry and biomaterials sciences at HSDM and D’Amato’s adviser, said the engineering background that she and D’Amato share will serve her in good stead in the future.“Lindsay’s engineering background has made her an excellent problem-solver,” Kim said. “As a dentist, you need to be a doctor, a scientist, an engineer, a mechanic, and an artist. … I’m excited for her future and her patients are very lucky to call her their dentist.”It was last August, while doing an externship at Massachusetts General Hospital, that D’Amato noticed problems with the vision in one eye. She had been working long hours, so she initially attributed it to fatigue, and then, when rest didn’t cure it, to an out-of-date eyeglasses prescription. When a new prescription didn’t do the trick, additional tests indicated the problem was with her optic nerve.By then, it was late November and D’Amato was increasingly fearful she had multiple sclerosis, which mirrors some of her symptoms. She went for an MRI and asked the doctor not to call her with results before the following Wednesday, because she was going to be in New York interviewing for residencies on Monday and Tuesday and had to sit for a board exam on Wednesday. They called Monday night.“I asked you not to call,” D’Amato recalls saying into the phone. “I’m standing on Fifth Avenue with a suitcase.”“I didn’t think this should wait,” the doctor replied. “There’s a mass on your brain.”D’Amato spent a tearful evening in her hotel room and called a friend in Australia whose husband is a neurosurgeon. He looked at the MRI files her physician sent over and told her that the tumor was in all likelihood a meningioma, which was treatable and, as brain tumors go, relatively good news.By the end of the first week of December, D’Amato had returned to Boston and been scheduled for surgery at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. The operation took 7½ hours, but was a success.“When I woke up, I reached for my glasses and I put my glasses on and I could see again, which was crazy,” D’Amato said. “They had said that … it looked like the optic nerve was intact, so we might know fairly quickly if it was going to get better afterward, so I was curious to find that out.”Now, she is looking forward to graduation and a residency in the Bronx at the Jacobi Medical Center.“After the year that I had?” D’Amato said. “I am so excited.” read more

Court tosses murder conviction over fire in secret tunnels

first_imgCOLLEGE PARK, Md. (AP) — A Maryland appeals court has overturned a wealthy stock trader’s conviction on a murder charge in the fiery death of a man who was helping him dig tunnels for an underground nuclear bunker. Daniel Beckwitt was sentenced in 2019 to nine years in prison after a jury convicted him for the death of 21-year-old Askia Khafra. A Court of Special Appeals panel ruled Friday that the evidence wasn’t sufficient to sustain Beckwitt’s second-degree “depraved heart” murder conviction. But it upheld his involuntary manslaughter conviction. Prosecutors said extreme hoarding conditions in Beckwitt’s home prevented Khafra from escaping after a fire broke out above the tunnels in a suburb of Washington, D.C.last_img

Saint Mary‘s professor publishes memoir of undergraduate years at Notre Dame

first_imgDepartment chair of humanistic studies Phil Hicks recently published a book entitled, “Old Notre Dame: Paul Fenlon, Sorin Hall & Me,” about a professor he became friends with when he was a history major at Notre Dame. “[It’s] a memoir of my undergraduate days when I befriended an 80-year-old professor who had lived in my dorm for 60 years,” Hicks said. “I wrote down everything he did and said — campus stories going back to 1915 — and helped him survive as the very last of the ‘bachelor dons,’” Hicks said. Hicks emphasized the importance of loyalty in his book, and he also discussed the uniqueness of friendships between the young and old. “One of its messages is that generations can be bridged in friendship more easily than we might think,” Hicks said. “The book also honors the value of history and tradition and of loyalty to institutions — in this case, Paul Fenlon’s loyalty to Notre Dame, Sorin Hall and the Catholic Church.“Hicks said he felt motivated to write about his professor because he was deeply involved in Notre Dame for decades. “Paul Fenlon had been a student at Notre Dame, a faculty member and a retiree, all the while living in Sorin Hall, and yet when I met him as a freshman in 1976, he seemed under-appreciated by the campus community, especially by my fellow Sorinites,” Hicks said.Even as a student, Hicks knew Fenlon’s story needed to be told. “I wanted to make a record of those stories and of Paul Fenlon’s daily life, because somehow I had become obsessed with the history of Sorin Hall, and I was convinced there was an audience for this material,” he said.For Hicks, writing this book wasn’t just about the history of the University and a narrative of Fenlon’s life. This book was deeply personal, as Hicks dug into parts of his own life as well.“Trying to set down on paper my own emotional response to his death was also hard to do because I’d never written anything so personal before,” he said.Writing this book took him around 44 years to finish, but the base of all of it was from his years as a student when he engaged directly with Fenlon. “By the spring semester, I was visiting him nearly every day, completely enchanted by his storytelling, and by the time I was a senior I had written a couple hundred pages on everything he did and said,“ Hicks said.Hicks elaborated on why, after all these years, he decided to write this book instead of donating his writings to the University Archives. “Originally, I thought I would just hand it over to the University Archives as a record of my undergraduate days,” Hicks said, “But it was so messy that I had to transcribe it first, and in so doing I recognized it made no sense without lots of explanatory context.” Once he decided that he wanted to turn his writings into a book, it took a few more years to find balance between writing, family time and work.“During the semester, I’m preoccupied with classes and departmental activities, so that leaves mainly summers and occasional sabbaticals for research,” Hicks said. “Don’t forget that my wife and four children are a priority for me, too. I don’t know if you could call my life a balanced one or not, because between family and work, I don’t have much of a social life.”Writing while raising a family and working a job was time consuming, but he was still able to publish his book. “It took about five years writing in my spare time to produce a good draft, then a few more years to get feedback on it, find a publisher and make final revisions.”Hicks hopes the book will resonate with many members of the Notre Dame community.“[The] book deals with so many facets of the school — the sports teams, dorm life, the professors and administration, the Holy Cross priests — that anyone with an interest in Notre Dame should enjoy it, whether they are current students, alums from the 1950s or just fans of the school,” Hicks said.Tags: department of humanistic studies, memoir, saint mary’slast_img read more

More Details Revealed About Broadway-Aimed First Wives Club Musical

first_img Bloodworth-Thomason also revealed that “we didn’t use the old script. Didn’t even reread it. I don’t do rewrites.” And who will be filling the classic Goldie Hawn/Diane Keaton/Bette Midler roles? “Our people will have to sing. I’ve been casting in New York and Hollywood, but not picked anyone yet. Stars aren’t a requisite.” View Comments We’re intrigued. The stage adaptation didn’t make it to Broadway after a San Diego run back in 2009 starring Barbara Walsh, Sheryl Lee Ralph and Karen Ziemba. This incarnation, directed by Simon Phillips, has music and lyrics by Motown’s Brian Holland, Lamont Dozier and Eddie Holland, along with a book by Bloodworth-Thomason and Rupert Holmes.center_img More information is coming to light about the previously reported stage adaptation of the First Wives Club, which is eyeing Broadway in fall 2015 following a run in Chicago. Linda Bloodworth-Thomason, who wrote the hit 1996 movie and is working on the show’s book, told the New York Post: “It’s a talksicle. It’s funny and takes place in ’92.” We’re envisioning big ballads, bigger shoulder pads and some smart one-liners.last_img read more

Sludge Eaters.

first_img Photo:UGA CAES Earthworms eat and convert sludge into a more environmentally safe product. Earthworms have a healthy appetite. If you get enough of themtogether and don’t disturb them, scientists say they can safely,quietly dispose of many forms of waste.Vermiculture is a composting system that uses worms to processorganic waste, said Sid Thompson, a professor of engineering withthe University of Georgia College of Agricultural and EnvironmentalSciences.The process could be a viable alternative, he said, for currentwaste-management practices that continue to grow more expensiveand impractical as the world’s population expands.Goes in Bad, Comes Out Good The earthworms don’t have to be trained for vermiculture or doanything unusual. They just do what comes naturally: eat. As theworms eat organic materials, such as sludge from wastewater treatmentplants, they excrete it as castings. Worm castings, which look much like freeze-dried coffee crystals,make good fertilizer for plants. They also improve the waterand nutrient-holding capacity of the soil. “Castings are more microbially active,” Thompson said.”The nutrients are more available to plants.”The worms get rid of the harmful waste and in return provide amuch nicer product that’s not as smelly. Not only are the castingseasy on the environment, they can catch a good price as well.Castings are advertised on the Internet for as much as $4.25 perpound.Cities around the world are looking to vermiculture to combatwaste problems, Thompson said. Vermiculture in India, one of themost heavily populated places in the world, gets rid of as muchas 30 tons of waste a day.Thompson said vermiculture could work for Georgia, too. To beviable on a large scale, though, it must be proven economicallyfeasible.Worms take to sludge like mice to cheese. In fact, one worm caneat its weight in sludge every day. One pound of worms can eatand process one pound of sludge.However, a large land area would be needed for the worms to processlarge amounts of sludge, said Jason Governo, a graduate studentworking closely with Thompson’s research.A Pound of Worms Can Tell You More Most vermiculture research uses only one or two worms in smalllaboratory settings. Thompson and Governo are using pounds ofworms in their research.Their studies show that only 3 to 4 inches of sludge can be placedonto the worms at any one time, Governo said. With such a thinlayer, it would take too much land and wouldn’t be economicallyfeasible for Georgia.But Thompson said the land problem could be solved simply. Heproposes placing the sludge and the worms in trays and then stackingthose trays in a tall structure. “There are ways this canbe done for waste in the state,” he said.Thompson said worms can convert a range of organic material, aslong as the material is presented in an acceptable form.Georgia is one of the leading poultry producers in the world.It’s also one of the leading producers of manure from layer hens,the birds that lay eggs. Large quantities of this manure can strainthe environment.Worms, Thompson said, could convert layer manure into a more environmentallyacceptable product. However, the natural high salt and ammoniacontent found in layer manure dries up and kills the worms.Vermiculture could be the answer to the large volume of chickenlitter produced in Georgia, he said. Scientists just have to findthe right way to present it to the worms.last_img read more

10 Incredible Photos of Frozen Waterfalls in Southern Appalachia

first_img2018  has already been a memorable year, ushering in a major cold snap in many parts of the Southeastern United States and slamming the East Coast with a historic weather event that’s being referred to in the media as a ‘bomb cyclone’.While much of the Blue Ridge was spared the type of intense blizzard conditions that reeked havoc on places further east, the region has fallen into the icy grips of prolonged frigid temperatures—recently dipping into the single digits in places as far south as Western North Carolina.While this weather kept less hardy adventures tucked away within the comfortable confines of their central heating systems, others took to the trails in search of frozen waterfalls. Some even set out with crampons affixed to their hiking boots and ice axes in hand and proceeded to ascend the frozen sides of said waterfalls—a brand of adventure that’s rarely possible here in the Southern Appalachians.We scoured our Instagram feed for ten of our favorite frozen waterfall shots from the region’s recent bout with extreme cold weather and aggregated them here for your viewing pleasure. Enjoy!last_img read more

Senate passes ‘Bioshield’ bill

first_img Gregg’s news release said the legislation authorizes $5.93 billion, “the amount appropriated for biodefense countermeasures in the DHS [Department of Homeland Security] Appropriations Act” for fiscal year 2004. An Associated Press report today said Senate passage of the bill was spurred by the anthrax and ricin attacks on Congress in the past few years and the recent detection of sarin gas in Iraq. The BioShield program was first proposed by President Bush in January 2003, and the House passed a BioShield bill last year. Congressional leaders predicted that the House would quickly pass the Senate-approved version, which would send it to President Bush. The legislation would allow the government to guarantee a market for promising drugs and vaccines for chemical, biological, and radiological agents. It would also enable the government to authorize the emergency use of drugs, vaccines, and other medical products that have not been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The Senate approved the measure 99-0. The report said the House overwhelmingly passed a Project BioShield last year. The story quoted Gregg as saying, “I expect the House to take our bill and move it on to the president.” May 20, 2004 (CIDRAP News) – The US Senate yesterday overwhelmingly passed “Project BioShield,” a 10-year, $5.6 billion program to promote rapid development and use of drugs and vaccines to counter biological and chemical weapons. Enables the National Institutes of Health to issue research and development grants more quickly and improves the NIH’s ability to use private experts and contractors Go to http://thomas.loc.gov/ and search S.15 under “bill number” for the 108th Congress. Allows the HHS secretary to authorize the emergency use of a drug or medical product without normal FDA approval if there is evidence that the product may be effective and there is no approved alternative The measure drew praise from Sen. Edward Kennedy, D-Mass., ranking member of the Health, Labor, Education and Pensions Committee. “The bill before the Senate guarantees that any company which develops a successful new product for these threats will find a willing buyer in the federal government,” he said. “With that guarantee, companies will make the investments needed to prepare for any attack.” Provides a special fund for countermeasures for biological, chemical, radiological, and nuclear agents To view the bill: The AP report said the legislation specifically targets smallpox, anthrax, botulinum toxin, plague, and Ebola virus. Sen. Judd Gregg, R-N.H., chairman of the Committee on Health, Labor, Education and Pensions, was a lead sponsor of the bill. A news release from Gregg’s office said the measure: “Passing and implementing Project BioShield is without question the most important step we can take to improve our nation’s bio-defense capabilities,” Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Tommy Thompson said in applauding the Senate’s action. “For example, funding from Project BioShield is already allowing us to acquire up to 75 million doses of the anthrax vaccine, beginning as soon as it becomes available next year.”last_img read more

Coronavirus forces delay of trade fairs, conferences

first_img* China Iron Ore 2020, Feb. 25-27: The event held by Fastmarkets in Beijing has been postponed to June 30–July 2.* East China Import and Export Commodity Fair), March 1-4:Due to be held in Shanghai, the fair usually attracts traders of garments and household goods. It was postponed until further notice.* POC2020, March 2-4: Bursa Malaysia Derivatives has postponed the Palm and Lauric Oils Price Outlook Conference & Exhibition 2020 to June 22-24, on health concerns.* Marine Money China, March 3-4: Originally slated to be held in Shanghai, organizers of the meeting for shipping financiers have said that it has been delayed, likely until November.* Food & Hotel Asia in Singapore, March 3-6: Organizers of the biennial trade show have postponed its first leg to July. The event attracted more than 80,000 attendees when it was last held in 2018.* National People’s Congress, likely to have started March 5: China is considering delaying the annual meeting of its top legislative body, five people familiar with the matter told Reuters.* 6th China LNG & Gas International Exhibition and Summit, Shanghai, March 4-6: Organizers said the event has been postponed until a later date this year. They are in the process of confirming the new date.* Asian Ferroalloys, March 16-18: The conference by Fastmarkets, due to be held in Shanghai, has been postponed with no new date given.* Art Basel Hong Kong show, March 19-21: The high-profile annual show has been cancelled.* SEMICON/FPD China 2020, March 18-30: The annual trade conference for the global chip industry in China was postponed until further notice.* China Development Forum, usually late March: Hosted by a foundation under the State Council, the conference was postponed until further notice.* Canton Fair, spring season from April 15: The venue of China’s oldest and biggest trade fair said it has suspended exhibitions until further notice.* Asian Business Aviation Conference & Exhibition, April 21-23: The show’s organizers, the National Business Aviation Association, said they would cancel this year’s show in Shanghai given health concerns and other challenges its participants faced. Over two dozen large trade fairs and industry conferences in China and overseas have been postponed due to travel curbs and concerns about the spread of a coronavirus, potentially disrupting billions of dollars worth of deals.In order of scheduled or likely dates:* Taipei International Book Exhibition, Feb. 4-9 – Billed as Taiwan’s largest annual literary event, the exhibition has been postponed to May 7-12. Topics :center_img * League of Legends Pro League, due to start Feb. 5: The e-sports league owned by gaming giant Tencent Holdings said it would postpone the start of its second week until further notice.* Singapore Airshow, Feb 11-16: The aviation leadership summit scheduled on the eve of the event was cancelled. The show itself will go ahead as planned, but on a smaller scale* China Commodity Markets Insight Forum 2020, Feb 19-20: The forum held by S&P Global Platts was delayed until further notice.* National Association of Travel Agents Singapore (NATAS) travel fair 2020, Feb 21-23: Moved to May because exhibitors were concerned about turnout at the fair.last_img read more