SUU Men’s Basketball Hosts San Diego Christian Thursday

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailCEDAR CITY, Utah-Thursday, Southern Utah men’s basketball gets back to action by hosting San Diego Christian at the America First Event Center.While the Thunderbirds are off to a stellar 3-1 start, the 76-71 loss at UNLV November 23 left a bitter taste in their mouths.Head Coach Todd Simon confirmed “we left a lot of opportunities hanging in the game,” when speaking of the loss at Las Vegas.Thus far on the season, the Thunderbirds are led by guard/forward Cameron Oluyitan with 14 points per game and forward Andre Adams is the leader on the glass for SUU, averaging 6.3 rebounds per game.The Hawks represent the Council For Christian Colleges and Universities and average 83.5 points per game while giving up 83.7 points per contest.They come into Cedar City with a record of 1-2 on the season.Derek Novsek comes into this game leading the Hawks with 27.7 points and 5.3 rebounds per contest. Tags: Andre Adams/Cameron Oluyitan/Derek Novsek/Southern Utah Men’s Basketball/Todd Simon/UNLV November 28, 2018 /Sports News – Local SUU Men’s Basketball Hosts San Diego Christian Thursday Written by Brad Jameslast_img read more

Hitchhiking his way to better drug delivery

first_imgWhen Samir Mitragotri entered the University of Mumbai as an undergraduate in the late 1980s, there was only one academic option for students in the technology track: chemical engineering.“None of us really knew what chemical engineering was when we chose to study it, and I was pretty sure I was going to end up working at a petrochemical company,” he says. But when he decided to continue his studies with a Ph.D. at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, he discovered something that would forever change his life: biology. “It was really mind-opening, the idea that engineers have a place in biology, and that there are biological problems that can be addressed by engineers in a unique way.”Today Mitragotri is, appropriately, the Hiller Professor of Bioengineering and Hansjörg Wyss Professor of Biologically Inspired Engineering at the Wyss Institute and the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.“My lab likes to exist at the interface, or boundary, between different disciplines. Over the years I’ve realized many interesting opportunities exist at interfaces that are hard to imagine or know about if you’re working exclusively within the confines of one field. Sometimes there’s a solution waiting for a problem, or a problem waiting for a solution, and those are best matched at that interface,” he says. Given his natural affinity for edges and boundaries, it is fitting that his research centers around biological barriers.A macrophage, or white blood cell, can carry a nanoparticle “backpack” (purple) deep into tissues to target specific sites of injury and disease. Credit: Wyss Institute at Harvard UniversityBiological barriers exist at multiple levels in our bodies. The outermost barrier is our skin, which keeps precious moisture (and all of our innards) in and harmful foreign invaders, from viruses to insects to the sun, out. Inside the body, the junctions between the cells that make up our arteries, veins, and capillaries form a barrier that keeps our blood flowing through our vessels rather than seeping everywhere. Our stomachs are filled with acid that kills and dissolves pathogens in our food. And our immune systems function like police forces that recognize, seek out, and destroy harmful bacteria, viruses, parasites, and even cancer cells. Understanding how these different kinds of barriers work, and how to potentially control the flow of molecules across them, is what gets Mitragotri out of bed in the morning.“We engineers do things in biology that are very different from what biologists generally do. Some of that might be creativity, some of it may be ignorance,” he says, with a laugh. “While biology has traditionally been about observing how things behave in nature, I tell my students that the best way to learn about a barrier is to disrupt it and see how it responds. If we do this with all the barriers, that knowledge bank can form the basis for creating better drug delivery methods. If we know how far we can perturb a barrier without compromising it, that gives us a clue about how best to deliver a drug across it.”Many pharmaceutical drugs are small molecules taken orally as a pill or liquid, and are absorbed into the body through the gut. The drug landscape, however, is beginning to shift to biological products such as vaccines, gene therapies, and recombinant proteins, all of which would be destroyed by the stomach and must be injected directly. In attempting to bypass the barrier of the gut by injecting them into the blood, however, these drugs run into new enemies: the liver and the spleen, which together form a kind of dynamic barrier that keeps harmful substances out of the body.“These are the clearing organs; their capillaries are lined with macrophages that are always on the lookout for any foreign substances to get rid of,” explains Mitragotri. “They’re especially good at clearing nanoparticles. If you deliver a tumor-fighting drug encapsulated in nanoparticles to a patient via an IV, less than 1 percent of the drug will actually get to the tumor.”Samir Mitragotri is using the body’s own blood cells to deliver drugs to their targets more efficiently and safely. Credit: Wyss Institute at Harvard UniversityMotivated by this and other dire statistics, Mitragotri and his team set out to develop a system that could help prevent nanoparticles from being cleared from the blood before they get to their target tissues. They quickly realized that blood cells are naturally able to do all the things that they wanted nanoparticles to do: red blood cells can live for up to four months and travel through the liver once a minute without being cleared; macrophages (or white blood cells) can infiltrate deep into tissues and hone in on sites of inflammation (i.e., tumors); and platelets selectively bind to specific places within the vasculature when injury occurs. Could nanoparticles somehow harness these cells’ special abilities to avoid being cleared from the blood and deliver their drugs more effectively?Beginning more than a decade ago, Mitragotri and colleagues at University of California, Santa Barbara, attached nanoparticles to the red blood cells of rodents and reintroduced the cells into the rodents’ bloodstreams. Almost miraculously, the rodents’ macrophages ignored the nanoparticles and treated the red blood cells normally, allowing them to remain in the blood rather than being cleared by the liver. “That was the first victory,” Mitragotri recalls.Eventually, the nanoparticles disappeared from the circulating blood, but the red blood cells did not. “Where did the nanoparticles go? In recent studies in collaboration with researchers from the University of Pennsylvania, we figured out that they got squeezed off the red blood cells in the capillaries, which are smaller in diameter than the blood cells themselves,” says Mitragotri. When the red blood cells were squeezed through those capillaries, the nanoparticles sheared off and got deposited in whatever organ the capillaries happened to be in. By changing which blood vessel the red-blood-cell-bound nanoparticles were injected into, the researchers could ensure that the nanoparticles would end up in whatever organ was downstream of the injection site. When the researchers introduced the “hitchhiked” nanoparticles into the carotid arteries of mice, 10 percent of them ended up in the brain compared with 1 percent when injecting nanoparticles by themselves — a 10-fold increase in delivery efficiency.In his latest paper, published in Nature Communications, Mitragotri and colleagues demonstrated that this hitchhiking method works in multiple organs in mice and pigs, and in whole human lungs, where a full 41percent of the nanoparticles introduced into blood were deposited into the lung. “In this study,” the authors write, “we have advanced the original concept of red-blood-cell hitchhiking from a prototype with modest delivery in mice, to the brink of mapping out the clinical studies.”In addition to the many potential applications of attaching nanoparticles to red blood cells, Mitragotri’s lab is also investigating hitchhiking them onto monocytes, the cells that differentiate into the macrophages that actively fight diseases like cancer. “Monocytes will eat nanoparticles if you try to attach them directly, so we had to figure out how to overcome that problem,” says Mitragotri.“We discovered that monocytes care a lot about whether particles are round or disk-like, and hard or soft. It turns out they can’t internalize disk-shaped, soft nanoparticles, so that’s what we made.” The monocytes came after those nanoparticles with a vengeance, as expected, but then simply held them on their surfaces without engulfing them. When the researchers induced monocytes with these “backpacks” to cross an endothelial barrier mimicking a blood-vessel wall, the monocytes carried their backpacks along with them, providing an effective transport method for delivering drugs to their target tissues.Mitragotri and his colleagues are now using that strategy not only to deliver drugs to a target, but to control macrophages themselves. Macrophages change their physical shape and chemical processes in response to their environment — that’s partly why they’re such good defenders. But tumors have evolved a sneaky mechanism of turning macrophages “off” when they arrive to try to kill the tumor; thus, nearly 50 percent of a given tumor may be composed of dormant macrophages. “We think that with this method, we can deliver the right trigger to the macrophages so that they can be polarized to the right type for fighting different diseases,” says Mitragotri. “We’re still in the very early stages of that in the lab.”last_img read more

Residential Life, Student Affairs discuss new residential life policies at special senate meeting

first_imgMarie Fazio | The Observer Associate vice president of residential life Heather Rakoczy Russell and vice president for Student Affairs Erin Hoffmann Harding attend a special senate meeting Tuesday evening to address new residential life policies.“We didn’t call this policy the senior exclusion policy. We called this policy differentiating on and off-campus experience,” Rakoczy Russell said. “What that means is what things off-campus will have access to and the ways that they will build community will look different than how on-campus students will.”Hoffmann Harding said the journey to the April 11 announcement began over four years ago, when Flaherty and Dunne Halls were opened to address the issue of overcrowding on campus. “We had seen a significant increase in proportion of seniors living off-campus,” Hoffmann Harding said. “We wanted to understand how important it was for all of us to have upperclassmen leadership in those communities. As wonderful as I hope all of your hall staff are, it’s equally valuable to have upperclassmen down the hall.”To determine the policies, officials used input from student focus groups and discussions and demographic analysis to determine trends in movement off-campus and possible factors that would entice students to say. Residential life systems at Vanderbilt University and University of Dayton were used as benchmarks, she said.“We believe deeply that this residential experience matters — it’s part of the undergraduate education,” Hoffmann Harding said. “We think it’s something that makes us different, we hope it’s something that makes us special. We hope ultimately that it’s a place where each student feels as if they belong.” This research led to the Sept. 2017 announcement of the six-semester residency requirement, which was announced prior to the application process of that year. A similar negative reaction to a six semester requirement overshadowed the announcement that several incentives would be announced as the first class affected by the residency requirement, the class of 2022, became upperclassmen. Rakoczy Russell said the team did not initially plan to announce the on and off-campus differentiation policies April 11, but were urged to include it in the announcement by rectors and members of residential communities. “We decided to tack on an extra item to the April 11 announcement, mainly so that first-year students will know that by the time they are seniors there will be a difference between the on and off-campus experience,” Rakoczy Russell said. “What that difference will be will be decided in conversation with students over the course of the next academic year with the idea that by this time next year, we can say fully fleshed out what that looks like.”Details are still undecided regarding senior fellow positions and block meal plans, although Rakoczy Russell expects to have official practices implemented by the fall of 2021.Rakoczy Russell said students have frequently mentioned the lack of consistency between residence halls — specifically across gender lines — in focus groups. To investigate this issue, 100% of rectors participated in an anonymous survey regarding enforcement of the policy.“Depending on the hall, depending on the rector, the size of the community, the perceived priorities or needs of that community, there were different practices relative to each hall, some of it divided on gender norms,” Rakoczy Russell said. “What I heard from students over time was that there was great dissatisfaction not knowing what they could count on as a hallmark of a residential community.”Rakoczy Russell said the survey found practices regarding off-campus senior differed between halls. This is a recent development, she said — about 10 years ago, some residence halls began allowing students to compete in interhall sports teams, particularly football, which eventually spread to other practices including dances. She noted future plans to send an email every August that details changes in consistency policies for that year. Katherine Fugate, an off-campus junior who plans to stay off-campus next year, said a certain kind of student  — one who lacks the “mainstream Notre Dame identity of being white, Catholic upper-class student who is heterosexual and cisgender” — may not find community in their residence hall. She cited Notre Dame’s commitment to Catholic Social Teaching, specifically preferential option for the poor, as a reason to allow those who would like to move off to do so without repercussions. “Any conversations about inclusion also include conversations about who’s excluded from those activities,” Fugate said. Hoffmann Harding said although individual student needs differ, student discussion groups revealed students of color and students receiving significant aid were more likely to stay on campus. “The single biggest and most significant predictor of whether or not a student moved was actually not receiving financial aid,” Hoffmann Harding said.As a possible solution to those who do not feel at home in their assigned dorms, the interhall transfer process was streamlined. Students are no longer required to speak with both rectors, and an exemption process — which overrides housing decisions — was put in place. Hoffmann Harding expressed a desire to continue the conversation with students during the process of shaping the policy throughout next school year. “As much as we regret that maybe some of our intentions were misunderstood here, I actually think it’s really exciting,” Hoffmann Harding said. “This is a conversation that matters. We know that you care. You care about these communities that you were a part of and you care about the experiences that you had there and that to me is very powerful.”Tags: Housing policy, residential life, Six Semester Policy, Student Affairs, student senate Student senate was joined by associate vice president of residential life Heather Rakoczy Russell and vice president for Student Affairs Erin Hoffmann Harding for a special meeting to address recently announced residential life policies Tuesday night in Duncan Student Center. The policies — which include incentives for on-campus seniors, enhancements for all students and efforts that differentiate on and off-campus experiences — were announced April 11 and met with major pushback from the student body.last_img read more

Rooney hurt by United form

first_img For Rooney, though, the players need to do their bit. “We all have to step up,” he told a number of national newspapers ahead of Sunday’s away game with Aston Villa. “It hasn’t been good enough of late and we all have to come forward and show why we were champions last year and do better. We have a good run of games now and hopefully we can do that.” Rooney is one United player who could be admonished of blame for United’s form. The England international has been the club’s stand-out player this season, but still considers himself culpable. “It’s not about me, it’s about the team. If the team isn’t doing well then my form is not important – we have to do well as a team and roll our sleeves up and really pull ourselves together,” he added. “It’s not nice (the table). We are all proud players and it’s not nice being there. It hurts. Hopefully there will be a reaction.” Much has been said about the transfer business Moyes did in the summer and how much he is expected to do in the forthcoming window. Some have criticised the Scot for his dealings, with others claiming United no longer spend big, but he is adamant that the money is there for him to freshen things up should he so wish. The champions currently sit ninth in the Premier League and are nine points behind Everton who occupy the fourth and final Champions League spot. With David Moyes still adapting to life in Sir Alex Ferguson’s place as manager, the transition has been a long one and questions have been asked of where United are heading on and off the field. Press Association “We can definitely find the money for a big deal, 100 per cent,” he told national newspapers. “I know that because the money was available this summer. We were very close to a major, major signing, and if it had gone through it would have definitely shown what the club is worth. “We didn’t do it in the end, we didn’t quite get there because players had chosen other clubs or made different decisions, but we were close to a couple of major signings and we didn’t miss out because of money, that’s for sure.” With United’s pursuit of a top-four spot currently off-beam, questions have been asked in some places as to how the club’s owners would react if Moyes and his players fail to qualify for the competition next season. Moyes was dubbed as ‘the chosen one’ after being picked for the job by Ferguson and former United defender Gary Neville believes Moyes should remain, no matter what. “My view is simple: David Moyes deserves to have the same period of time that every Manchester United manager has had,” he wrote in the Mail on Sunday. “I don’t care what Chelsea or Real Madrid do in sacking their managers after winning trophies. “Manchester United should be different and stay true to their values. And even if United didn’t qualify for the Champions League, which would be a huge disappointment, I would maintain that view.” Wayne Rooney is “hurt” by the way Manchester United’s title defence has started and has told his team-mates they need to start delivering.last_img read more

Iwobi Picks Eagles over Arsenal

first_imgThe youngster has been in fine form for club and country over the past few weeks with his performance last weekend against Watford catching the eye. Iwobi scored a goal and made an assist as the Gunners beat Watford 4-0.Nigeria won the Olympic football gold in 1996 in Atlanta with a squad that had Iwobi’s uncle Austin ‘Jay-Jay’ Okocha, Nwankwo Kanu and Victor Ikpeba.Current Under-23 coach Samson Siasia, was in charge at Beijing 2008 as Nigeria won the silver, losing the final to a Lionel Messi inspired Argentine side.The ‘Dream Team’ won the Africa U-23 Nations Cup in Senegal to book a ticket for the Rio Olympics with Siasia in-charge.The former FC Nantes striker will look to go one further than he did eight years ago in China.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram Nigeria’s newest kid on the block, Alex Iwobi will likely miss Arsenal’s start to the 2016/17 season after indicating interest to play for Nigeria at the 2016 Rio Olympics this August.Iwobi, who made his international debut in the 1-1 draw with Egypt in a 2017 Africa Cup of Nations qualifier in Kaduna last month wants to line up for Nigeria’s Olympic side in the football event the commences on August 3.Arsenal begins the season ten days after the Olympic tournament starts and if Nigeria gets to the final, Iwobi will still be in Brazil by August 20, a move which might pop up a club vs country clash.last_img read more