Fury as 79-year-old forced to be wheeled 200 yards to ambulance

first_imgA 79-year-old man had to be trolleyed more than 200 yards into an ambulance because a footbridge to his home has not been replaced. The man, who is confined to a wheelchair, collapsed at his home in Bunbeg, West Donegal overnight.However, emergency medical personnel could not get their vehicle near his home after the footpath collapsed and was washed away during flooding in August when the local River Clady burst its banks. Instead, the frustrated paramedics were forced to wheel the man more than 200 yards from his home to the main road where he could be taken by ambulance to hospital.The man’s son, Sean O Duibhir has slammed the delay in having the footpath replaced so that vehicles can cross it.The 79 year old man being wheel from his home.“Thankfully dad is okay but I had to call neighbours to help us wheel him down to the road with the paramedics.“It was dark but at least it was not raining. But wheeling a sick man two hundred yards down a road and across a temporary bridge just so he can get into an ambulance is just not on. “The bridge needs to be replaced immediately but we have heard nothing as to when that will be,” said Sean.Local county councillor Micheal Mac Giolla Easbuig is fuming at the delay in replacing the bridge.He said “This is utterly and totally unacceptable that this has happened in this day and age. The Government has completely failed this family.The homes of three families in Gweedore including a wheelchair bound resident who are trapped after flooding demolished the bridge into their homes. (North West Newspix)“This man had to be wheeled by ambulance personnel, helped by family and neighbours for more than 200 yards to reach the ambulance.“They have completely stripped him of his dignity and all because they will not properly replace the bridge. “The Government needs to do the right thing by this family and fix this bridge once and for all,” he said.Sean and Martina Diver and children after the bridge was washed away. (North West Newspix)Fury as 79-year-old forced to be wheeled 200 yards to ambulance was last modified: October 24th, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:ambulancebridgeBunbegdonegalRepairslast_img read more

Evolutionists Undermine Their Own Truth Claims

first_imgTwo evolutionists appeal to “evolutionary forces” to explain the rise of bad science.A guy saws off the branch he’s sitting on. That’s a common theme in cartoons. Sometimes it happens in real life, too. In fact, there’s a Darwin Awards program for people who do stupid things that risk eliminating themselves from the gene pool (example on YouTube). This week, perhaps, it should be awarded to a couple of Darwinian scientists who say, according to New Scientist, “Evolutionary forces are causing a boom in bad science.”Paul Smaldino and Richard McElreath at the University of California Davis used an evolutionary theory-based computational model to analyse the problem of bad science. They found that “the most powerful incentives in contemporary science actively encourage, reward and propagate poor research methods and abuse of statistical procedures”. In short, it’s natural selection for shoddy science.There’s widespread concern that science is in a state of crisis. Vox.com reported results of a survey of 270 scientists about the seven biggest problems facing science:Academia has a huge money problem.Too many studies are poorly designed [i.e., not intelligently designed].Replicating results is crucial. But scientists rarely do it.Peer review is broken. [See 7/09/16]Too much science is locked behind paywalls.Science is poorly communicated to the public.Life as a young academic is incredibly stressful.But since natural selection cannot get from “is” to “ought”, there’s no way to call the situation bad or good. It just is what it is. In fact, if natural selection produced eyes and wings and a myriad of other trophies of progress, then Smaldino and McElreath ought to celebrate this new evolutionary innovation they call “bad science.”Smaldino and McElreath found that their model pushed researchers to do less rigorous science, and publish more false positives. They suggest that their model shows that bad science can be explained as a result of the evolutionary selective pressures that are acting on scientists.But how can they call rigorous science a virtue? The tree sloth is not rigorous. The earthworm is not rigorous. Some creatures are rigorous, like the peregrine falcon, but some are not. As for false positives, deception is common in nature: some butterflies mimic toxic species to avoid being eaten. If evolutionary selective pressures are acting on scientists, then Praise the Origin! Darwin’s theory is working, and humans are evolving—just like another article on New Scientist claims. On what basis can they ask scientists to escape the irrepressible evolutionary pressures that are acting on them?The only way Smaldino and McElreath can call bad science “bad” is to appeal to a standard that does not evolve. Perhaps they could use one that says, “Thou shalt not bear false witness” or “Thou shalt not covet what is thy neighbor’s” or “Whatever you do, do it heartily as to the Lord and not unto men.”Isn’t it funny how proponents of self-refuting claims fail to see through their own fallacies? Speaking of cartoons, they’re like Daffy Duck the moment before he realizes he just skied off a cliff. Hanging in mid-air, he continues quacking away, until he happens to look down. Then there’s that brief look of “Uh-oh!” and – pfew! Gravity takes over.Do your charitable duty while Daffy is quacking away. Snap your fingers to get his attention, and point down. Some may wish to do this before he skis off the cliff. (Visited 47 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more