Milder and Melting This Week

first_imgNow that the weekend winter storm is past us, it time to look ahead to this week. We will have one more day of frigid temperatures before the freeze eases. High temperatures on Monday will struggle to reach 30 degrees despite another bright sunny day. Watch for re-freezing at night as any melting that occurs during the day will ice up again after dark.Lows Tuesday morning, not as frigid, but still below freezing.Tuesday morning will probably be our last time we will see temperatures below freezing for at least the next 10 days as High Pressure slides off the coast and southwest winds will begin to erode the frigid air. This will allow temperatures will climb back above normal (mid 40s).Computer models show a ridge of High Pressure off of the Southeast U.S. which pushes milder air into our area. (Courtesy:tropicaltidbits.com)Major melting by Wednesday as a warm front moves through bringing a period of rain in the morning and afternoon temperatures climbing to around 50 degrees!For the remainder of the week, a mild southwest flow will keep high temperatures in the upper 50s (possible 60) for Thursday and Friday. A cold front will approach late Friday with the threat of some showers.Computer models shows 50s (close to 60 degrees) by Friday. (Courtesy:tropicaltidbits.com)As far as the weekend, the weather continues to look active as we will be in a battle zone between a cold high pressure system to our north and a series of disturbances that will slide through our area from the south. This will cause a chilly, wet weekend with a wintry mess possible especially Central and Northern NJ and N&W of Philly.Computer models show a chilly, wet pattern this weekend for us, and wintry mess N&W of Philly, Northern NJ. (Courtesy: tropicaltidbits.com)last_img read more

Saint Mary‘s professor publishes memoir of undergraduate years at Notre Dame

first_imgDepartment chair of humanistic studies Phil Hicks recently published a book entitled, “Old Notre Dame: Paul Fenlon, Sorin Hall & Me,” about a professor he became friends with when he was a history major at Notre Dame. “[It’s] a memoir of my undergraduate days when I befriended an 80-year-old professor who had lived in my dorm for 60 years,” Hicks said. “I wrote down everything he did and said — campus stories going back to 1915 — and helped him survive as the very last of the ‘bachelor dons,’” Hicks said. Hicks emphasized the importance of loyalty in his book, and he also discussed the uniqueness of friendships between the young and old. “One of its messages is that generations can be bridged in friendship more easily than we might think,” Hicks said. “The book also honors the value of history and tradition and of loyalty to institutions — in this case, Paul Fenlon’s loyalty to Notre Dame, Sorin Hall and the Catholic Church.“Hicks said he felt motivated to write about his professor because he was deeply involved in Notre Dame for decades. “Paul Fenlon had been a student at Notre Dame, a faculty member and a retiree, all the while living in Sorin Hall, and yet when I met him as a freshman in 1976, he seemed under-appreciated by the campus community, especially by my fellow Sorinites,” Hicks said.Even as a student, Hicks knew Fenlon’s story needed to be told. “I wanted to make a record of those stories and of Paul Fenlon’s daily life, because somehow I had become obsessed with the history of Sorin Hall, and I was convinced there was an audience for this material,” he said.For Hicks, writing this book wasn’t just about the history of the University and a narrative of Fenlon’s life. This book was deeply personal, as Hicks dug into parts of his own life as well.“Trying to set down on paper my own emotional response to his death was also hard to do because I’d never written anything so personal before,” he said.Writing this book took him around 44 years to finish, but the base of all of it was from his years as a student when he engaged directly with Fenlon. “By the spring semester, I was visiting him nearly every day, completely enchanted by his storytelling, and by the time I was a senior I had written a couple hundred pages on everything he did and said,“ Hicks said.Hicks elaborated on why, after all these years, he decided to write this book instead of donating his writings to the University Archives. “Originally, I thought I would just hand it over to the University Archives as a record of my undergraduate days,” Hicks said, “But it was so messy that I had to transcribe it first, and in so doing I recognized it made no sense without lots of explanatory context.” Once he decided that he wanted to turn his writings into a book, it took a few more years to find balance between writing, family time and work.“During the semester, I’m preoccupied with classes and departmental activities, so that leaves mainly summers and occasional sabbaticals for research,” Hicks said. “Don’t forget that my wife and four children are a priority for me, too. I don’t know if you could call my life a balanced one or not, because between family and work, I don’t have much of a social life.”Writing while raising a family and working a job was time consuming, but he was still able to publish his book. “It took about five years writing in my spare time to produce a good draft, then a few more years to get feedback on it, find a publisher and make final revisions.”Hicks hopes the book will resonate with many members of the Notre Dame community.“[The] book deals with so many facets of the school — the sports teams, dorm life, the professors and administration, the Holy Cross priests — that anyone with an interest in Notre Dame should enjoy it, whether they are current students, alums from the 1950s or just fans of the school,” Hicks said.Tags: department of humanistic studies, memoir, saint mary’slast_img read more

Reversing The Brain Drain

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Long Island is in the midst of historic change. For years, as other regions invested in areas like quality, affordable rental housing, mixed-use development, and public transit, LI was content with the status quo.We sat silent as we watched droves of young people — educated in our outstanding public schools at significant expense — leave home and help create economic growth in other regions of our country.The Regional Plan Association recently issued a report that called for a new approach to suburban growth, one that centers on transit-oriented development. It calls for better transit, more inclusive communities, more housing in downtowns — things that make our region more competitive for the young, high-knowledge, high-skill workers we need to grow our economy.My administration has championed this approach for years through Suffolk County’s Connect Long Island Plan. The plan champions innovation, collaboration, and smart- growth policies to make us a more attractive place to work, live, and raise a family.Today, a new suburbia is on the horizon, and Suffolk County is leading the way.In Wyandanch, we are close to completing the first phase of development for the $600 million project near the Long Island Rail Road station. Governing magazine recently profiled the project as a national model for suburban revitalization.Last November, we broke ground on the first phase of the $650 million Ronkonkoma Hub mixed-use project. When this project is fully built out, it will deliver a true walkable downtown and create 18,000 jobs. And this is all happening right as the LIRR Double Track Project nears completion.Recently, I joined Southampton Town Supervisor Jay Schneiderman to break ground on a $30 million affordable housing project for middle-class families that is only 300 feet from the Speonk LIRR station.These critical projects for our region are supported by the investment in transportation infrastructure by Gov. Andrew Cuomo. The Double Track and LIRR Expansion Project along the mainline, combined with East Side Access, will be game changers.These projects collectively will significantly reduce commuting times to the city for thousands of Long Islanders. They also open up the Island for real reverse commuting that will make our region more attractive for businesses to locate here because they can now access the talent they need from the broader region. It will also open up the possibility for real intra-island commuting for the first time.Our ambitious regional transportation and development plan, Connect Long Island, will spur economic growth while creating new north-south connections from one train line to another. And as the first suburban county in the state outside of New York City to embrace ride sharing, Suffolk residents are already enjoying additional transit options while providing the last mile connection to our train stations.These are the types of projects that will reverse the brain drain and bring people back to LI. This is about protecting the suburban communities that we love by adapting to the transformative change happening in our world. As a parent of three young kids, I believe that this is about building a better future on LI for all our families.Steve Bellone is the Suffolk County Executive.last_img read more