Pogba propels Man United to victory against Young Boys

first_img0Shares0000Paul Pogba scored a brace and got an assist in Manchester United’s win away to Young Boys© AFP Alain GROSCLAUDEBERN, Switzerland, Sep 19 – Paul Pogba was the driving force with a brace as Manchester United recovered from a shaky start to record an ultimately convincing 3-0 win away to Young Boys in their opening Champions League game in Bern on Wednesday.Skipper Pogba’s superb opening goal cut down the Swiss champions in their prime, and he then doubled the English side’s lead from a penalty just before the break. The France star also set up the third goal for compatriot Anthony Martial in the second half, as Jose Mourinho’s side safely negotiated this fixture on the synthetic surface at the Stade de Suisse.Seemingly a club in crisis at the end of August following their 3-0 home defeat against Tottenham Hotspur, this was United’s third straight win since then, all away from home.Tougher tests await in Group H, though, with Valencia due at Old Trafford in a fortnight and Juventus — who won 2-0 in Spain on Wednesday despite having Cristiano Ronaldo sent off — to come after that.There were plenty of reasons to be wary of this trip, with United having lost to Basel on their last two visits to Switzerland, while Mourinho also lost in Basel with Chelsea in 2013.Meanwhile, the surface here was deemed a sufficient hazard by Mourinho for him to leave Antonio Valencia out of his squad. That meant a debut for Portuguese teenager Diogo Dalot, signed in the close season from FC Porto.His introduction was one of five changes made by Mourinho following the weekend win at Watford, with Martial also coming in for his first start since the defeat at Brighton a month ago.This was not a fixture to take lightly. It was a huge occasion for Young Boys, Swiss champions last season for the first time since 1986 and making their Champions League group stage debut.They were driven on by an electric atmosphere generated by a crowd of over 31,000 and were the better team for 35 minutes.With Swiss starlet Kevin Mbabu a driving force from right-back, the hosts saw giant striker Guillaume Hoarau head just wide while Mohamed Ali Camara and Christian Fassnacht both tested David de Gea from range.Marcus Rashford hit the outside of the post from a Luke Shaw cross, but the visitors were largely passive, seemingly waiting to pounce on a mistake, or for a moment of magic.That is what happened 10 minutes before the interval as Pogba’s superb footwork on the edge of the box set him up to lash a shot beyond goalkeeper David Von Ballmoos and into the roof of the net.He had his first Champions League goal since returning to Old Trafford in 2016, and it deflated the buoyant home support.– Controversial penalty –Still, Young Boys would have maintained a fighting chance had they gone in just one goal behind at the interval. But the decision by German referee Deniz Aytekin to award United a penalty two minutes before the break effectively killed the game.Shaw’s cross struck the arm of Mbabu from close range. It was a harsh call and highlighted the absence of Video Assistant Referees in the Champions League.Pogba converted the spot-kick, and with the home side unable to find a way back into the game after half-time, he was also the architect of the visitors’ third goal midway through the second half.After a driving run towards the penalty box, the captain set up Martial, whose low shot beat Von Ballmoos with the aid of a slight deflection.0Shares0000(Visited 2 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

Scientists spot genes that make some sarcomas less aggressive

first_imgShare2Editor’s note: A link to a high-resolution image for download appears at the end of this release. David [email protected] [email protected] spot genes that make some sarcomas less aggressive Rice, Duke team model mechanism that could lead to new approaches against cancer HOUSTON – (Sept. 19, 2016) – Scientists at Rice and Duke universities have identified a set of genes they say make sarcoma cells less aggressive. They hope to turn the discovery into new therapeutic approaches to fight metastatic cancers.The work by members of Rice’s Center for Theoretical Biological Physics led by co-director and biophysicist Herbert Levine and scientists at Duke combined simulations and experiments to uncover genes that regulate how cells transition from epithelial (nonmobile) to mesenchymal (migrating) — or vice versa.The work appears on the October cover of the American Society for Microbiology journal Molecular and Cellular Biology.The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, known as EMT, is a characteristic of developmental processes but can be hijacked by cells that turn cancerous and metastatic. A previous study by Rice’s theoretical group found that during EMT, some cells are in a hybrid state that has both epithelial and mesenchymal properties, including group migration.The reverse, aka MET, is important to normal development but is also suspected of helping roving mesenchymal cancer cells use epithelial characteristics to settle in distant organs and initiate metastasis.“We’re interested in understanding the hierarchy of controls that cells use when they change from one phenotype to another,” Levine said. “Most of the work here has been on carcinoma cells, which start out as epithelial and then, as part of the metastatic process, pick up mesenchymal-like properties in order to move and evade detection.“Here the opportunity was to look at the same process, but almost in reverse. Here we have a cell that’s really mesenchymal, but it has picked up certain properties to be epithelial,” he said. “We were interested in how symmetric these processes were. And the answer is there are some degrees of symmetry but there are some clear differences that seem to involve what I think of as the second layer of how regulation works.”Cells change their orientation from mesenchymal to epithelial or back depending on genetic signals or mutations, Levine said. “When a gene is expressed for a very long time — or not expressed for a very long time — that gets encoded at the structural level of DNA,” he said. “So the DNA of genes that are used often are more accessible.“We discovered these sarcoma cells, which are really mesenchymal, have gone to this extra structural level of DNA organization where epithelial-like genes are more strongly constrained.” That, he said, makes it much harder for hybrid cells to drop their epithelial traits.Both EMT and MET exhibit what’s called phenotypic plasticity, in this case the ability of a cell to change its type in response to changes in its environment. But in some types of sarcomas — malignant tumors that develop in soft tissue and bone – roving mesenchymal cells seem to acquire a greater share of the traits of stationary epithelial cells.According to lead author Jason Somarelli of Duke Cancer Institute, “Patients whose sarcomas have more of these epithelial-like traits have better survival outcomes. They live longer than patients whose sarcomas do not exhibit this phenotypic plasticity.”The team found that in multiple sarcoma cell lines, the combined expression of the micro RNA-200 family and upregulation of an epithelial gene activator, GRHL2, led to downregulation of the ZEB1 protein, which makes cells lean more toward epithelial-like behavior and therefore less aggressive.The initiative at Duke first caught the eye of Rice graduate student Mohit Kumar Jolly, who with Levine has published related works based on predictive computer simulations of biological systems. The ability of cells to become epithelial-mesenchymal hybrids was the topic of a 2015 study in which the Rice team discovered that tumors depend on these hybrids to hijack cell-signaling processes.“We thought they were looking at the same players that we were, but they are connected differently in sarcomas as compared to carcinomas,” Jolly said. “They had different results from what our initial model predicted, so we developed a new mathematical model to capture cellular plasticity in sarcomas.”The next challenge, Levine said, will be to understand the mechanism by which genes that encode the relevant proteins are made available in DNA’s chromatin structure, a subject of ongoing study at Rice. “We want to understand how those factors either help or prevent cells from going through the phenotypic transitions we think are important for cancer metastasis,” he said.The paper’s co-authors are Samantha Shetler, Xueyang Wang, Suzanne Bartholf Dewitt, Alexander Hish, Shivee Gilja, William Eward, Kathryn Ware and Andrew Armstrong, all of Duke, and Mariano Garcia-Blanco of Duke and the University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston.The research was supported by the Duke Cancer Institute, the Duke University Genitourinary Oncology Laboratory, the Duke University Department of Orthopaedics, the National Science Foundation, the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas and the National Institutes of Health.-30-Read the abstract at http://mcb.asm.org/content/36/19/2503.abstractThis news release can be found online at http://news.rice.edu/2016/09/19/scientists-spot-genes-that-make-some-sarcomas-less-aggressive/Follow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNewsRelated materials:Researchers Identify Genes That Make Sarcomas Less Aggressive: https://sites.duke.edu/dukecancerinstitute/researchers-identify-genes-that-make-sarcomas-less-aggressive/Center for Theoretical Biological Physics: https://ctbp.rice.eduRice Department of Bioengineering: http://bioengineering.rice.eduImage for download: http://news.rice.edu/files/2016/09/0919_SARCOMA-1-WEB-22rlklp.jpgRice University researchers Mohit Kumar Jolly, left, and Herbert Levine. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University)Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation’s top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,910 undergraduates and 2,809 graduate students, Rice’s undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice is ranked No. 1 for happiest students and for lots of race/class interaction by the Princeton Review. Rice is also rated as a best value among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. To read “What they’re saying about Rice,” go to http://tinyurl.com/RiceUniversityoverview. AddThislast_img read more