Oakland City University Alumni To Be Inducted Into The Indiana Basketball Hall of Fame

first_imgOakland City University Alumni To Be Inducted Into The Indiana Basketball Hall of FameOakland City University is proud to acknowledge two of our alumni who are being inducted on March 25, 2020, into the Indiana Basketball Hall of Fame.  Jerry Reynolds received his BS degree in Social Studies from then Oakland City College in 1966.  During his senior year, he coached the 1965-66 freshman team.  He has led a notable career in high school, college and professional basketball.  A two-time honorable mention all-state player at Springs Valley High School, he was a member of teams at Vincennes University that was 51-14 over two seasons.  His coaching career continued at Vincennes, where he was an assistant from 1966-1971, including their 1970 NJCAA National Championship season and where he recruited future NBA players Bob McAdoo, “Foots” Walker and Ricky Green.  As an assistant at West Georgia College, he was a member of their 1974 NAIA National Championship coaching staff.  In 10 years as the head coach at Rockhurst University and Pittsburg State University produced 192 wins and four District Coach of the Year honors.  The longest-tenured employee in Sacramento King’s history, his now 35-year career began as the franchise relocated from Kansas City in 1985 and has included the roles of head coach, assistant coach, scout, director of player personnel, general manager and television analyst.  His influence is also noted as the first general manager of the WNBA Sacramento Monarchs, earning his name in the rafters for his impact on that franchise.  He was also a member of the 2004 U.S. Women’s Olympic Team Selection Committee that won the gold medal.  He resides in Roseville, California.The late Ray Roesner graduated from then Oakland City College in 1957 with a BSE degree in Physical Education, History and Geography.  He was also named Mr. Basketball in 1956. His career reaped accolades as a high school and college player as well as notable coach and administrator roles.  A 1953 graduate of Holland High School, he set school records in single-game points (41), season scoring (617) and career points (830).  He averaged 23.7 points per game his senior season, leading Holland to their first sectional championship and was the state’s leading scorer in the 1953 regionals, totaling 62 points in two games.  His college career included 858 points in two seasons at Oakland City College (21.5 ppg), setting the school’s season scoring record (541).  His senior year 25.8 point per game average was 2nd best in Indiana, trailing only Hall of Famer Bailey Robertson.  He coached 18 seasons at Chrisney, Orleans, Princeton, Holland and Southridge high schools, totaling 201 wins and five sectional championships and was an assistant coach for the Southridge 1998 IHSAA 2A girls champion squad.  Also serving 15 years as the last Principal of Holland High School and first Principal of Southridge High School, he served two terms on the IHSAA Board of Control.  He died in 2018.Jerry Reynolds and Ray Roesner join five other Oakland City University alumni as members of the Indiana Basketball Hall of Fame: C. Eugene Cato, 1952; Joe Todrank, 1961, Herman Keller, 1927; Phil Eskew, Sr. 1929; and Charles McConnell, 1925. FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

Lamont Open 24/7 for Reading Period and Exams

first_imgDuring reading period and final exams, Lamont Library will remain open 24/7 as part of a pilot to explore longer permanent hours for the library at this time each semester, Harvard College Dean Evelynn M. Hammonds and Interim Head of Harvard College Library Susan Fliss announced today. Read Full Storylast_img

Sludge Eaters.

first_img Photo:UGA CAES Earthworms eat and convert sludge into a more environmentally safe product. Earthworms have a healthy appetite. If you get enough of themtogether and don’t disturb them, scientists say they can safely,quietly dispose of many forms of waste.Vermiculture is a composting system that uses worms to processorganic waste, said Sid Thompson, a professor of engineering withthe University of Georgia College of Agricultural and EnvironmentalSciences.The process could be a viable alternative, he said, for currentwaste-management practices that continue to grow more expensiveand impractical as the world’s population expands.Goes in Bad, Comes Out Good The earthworms don’t have to be trained for vermiculture or doanything unusual. They just do what comes naturally: eat. As theworms eat organic materials, such as sludge from wastewater treatmentplants, they excrete it as castings. Worm castings, which look much like freeze-dried coffee crystals,make good fertilizer for plants. They also improve the waterand nutrient-holding capacity of the soil. “Castings are more microbially active,” Thompson said.”The nutrients are more available to plants.”The worms get rid of the harmful waste and in return provide amuch nicer product that’s not as smelly. Not only are the castingseasy on the environment, they can catch a good price as well.Castings are advertised on the Internet for as much as $4.25 perpound.Cities around the world are looking to vermiculture to combatwaste problems, Thompson said. Vermiculture in India, one of themost heavily populated places in the world, gets rid of as muchas 30 tons of waste a day.Thompson said vermiculture could work for Georgia, too. To beviable on a large scale, though, it must be proven economicallyfeasible.Worms take to sludge like mice to cheese. In fact, one worm caneat its weight in sludge every day. One pound of worms can eatand process one pound of sludge.However, a large land area would be needed for the worms to processlarge amounts of sludge, said Jason Governo, a graduate studentworking closely with Thompson’s research.A Pound of Worms Can Tell You More Most vermiculture research uses only one or two worms in smalllaboratory settings. Thompson and Governo are using pounds ofworms in their research.Their studies show that only 3 to 4 inches of sludge can be placedonto the worms at any one time, Governo said. With such a thinlayer, it would take too much land and wouldn’t be economicallyfeasible for Georgia.But Thompson said the land problem could be solved simply. Heproposes placing the sludge and the worms in trays and then stackingthose trays in a tall structure. “There are ways this canbe done for waste in the state,” he said.Thompson said worms can convert a range of organic material, aslong as the material is presented in an acceptable form.Georgia is one of the leading poultry producers in the world.It’s also one of the leading producers of manure from layer hens,the birds that lay eggs. Large quantities of this manure can strainthe environment.Worms, Thompson said, could convert layer manure into a more environmentallyacceptable product. However, the natural high salt and ammoniacontent found in layer manure dries up and kills the worms.Vermiculture could be the answer to the large volume of chickenlitter produced in Georgia, he said. Scientists just have to findthe right way to present it to the worms.last_img read more

Birmingham confirm deal for former Everton striker

first_img1 Birmingham have landed James Vaughan on loan from Huddersfield until the end of the season – when he will sign a permanent deal.The 27-year-old has spent the last month on loan with the Blues and has racked up six appearances for Gary Rowett’s side.He has yet to open his account for the club but has made a positive impression and the Terriers were happy to let him extend his stay at St Andrews.The former Everton striker, who holds the record as the youngest ever scorer in the Premier League at just 16 years and 271 days, is out of contract at the end of the season.And Birmingham have confirmed Vaughan will pen a permanent one-year contract when his loan ends, which will include the option of a further year. James Vaughan last_img