Common limitations of a new core provider

first_img continue reading » In our continuing series discussing the survey by Callahan & Associates and their webinar, “It’s All About the Core,” today we look at and analyze the response of credit union executives when asked what common limitations they encountered after selecting and transitioning to a new core technology provider. A credit union core system review and the resulting core migration carries many changes for an organization, and usually, the migration to a new provider brings technology the credit union was otherwise lacking. It’s a known fact that this is no small project, and it is always assumed you will encounter some obstacles along the way. Here are the most common shortcomings that caught these executives off guard:1) Lending Capabilities. With lending being such a huge driver to the bottom line and ultimate success of a credit union, it is no wonder that this tops the list. No matter how robust a lending platform is, there’s always room for improvement on this all-important platform. The biggest complaint is the apparent disconnect in loan origination systems, especially as it pertains to commercial lending versus consumer lending. With these two very distinct lending processes, many CU’s still found they have to navigate separate and disparate systems, even after a core migration. 5SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

ÖAMTC: Croatia is the leading foreign destination on the Austrian market

first_imgAccording to the research “Reisemonitoring”, which he conducted ÖAMTC, Austrian National Auto-Moto Club, Croatia is the leading foreign destination on the Austrian market.According to the survey, which was conducted in March and April on a sample of 800 respondents, Italy is in second place, Spain is in third place, while about 18 percent of Austrians for the main holiday remain in their own country. It is a very reference study with comparable data because the same research methodology has been used for the past seven years. The focus of this year’s research was on the organization of annual leave.The survey also showed that two thirds of Austrians plan their longer vacation (up to 14 days) at least once a year, while every fourth respondent also plans an additional shorter vacation (up to 4 days). During the main holiday, they prefer swimming and sunbathing, and use car (42 percent) and air transport (41 percent) as a means of transport, which is an increase in the share of air transport chosen by only one in three Austrian passengers in previous years. Croatia, ie the cities of Zagreb, Split, Dubrovnik, Rijeka and Zadar in the summer flying season are connected with a total of 31 scheduled and charter flights, mostly with Vienna, namely the airlines Austrian Airlines and Croatia Airlines.The data further show that Austrians prefer to organize their own holidays, ie without the mediation of agencies. This especially refers to the segment of young people who intensively use the Internet or direct booking, and these trends are followed by the elderly population, because as many as 56 percent of people over 60 also organize their vacation in this way.Austria has an annual share of about 8 percent in the total Croatian tourist traffic, which ranks this market in the high third place of the top markets with the largest tourist traffic, just behind the leading Germany and Slovenia. Also, over 60 percent of Austrians in Croatia are regular guests who prefer accommodation in hotels, then household facilities, and camps. During the last year, Austrian tourists spent the most nights in Rovinj, Poreč, Umag, Medulin and Mali Lošinj.Side dish:1. ÖAMTC Reisemonitoring: Holidays 2018 so bay and travel Austria2. Issue market profile: Austria http://www.cro-diasporacongress.com/last_img read more