Ag Hall of Fame

first_imgThe Georgia Agricultural Hall of Fame will welcome two new inductees at a ceremony Sept. 20 at 6 p.m. in the UGA Hotel and Conference Center. Claud Adams, known as Georgia’s father of 4-H, and Louis Boyd, a leading animal scientist, were selected by the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Alumni Association awards committee. The Georgia Agricultural Hall of Fame was established in 1972 to recognize individuals making unusual and extraordinary contributions to agriculture and agribusiness industries in Georgia. “In this day of rapid progress and change, it is more important than ever to preserve Georgia’s rich agricultural history,” said Juli Fields, director of alumni relations for the college. “The 2013 inductees have contributed in extraordinary ways to agriculture in Georgia. They serve as excellent examples of how one individual can make a significant and profound impact on the lives of Georgia’s citizens.” Inductees are nominated by members of the public and selected by the awards committee. Those nominated are required to have impeccable character and outstanding leadership, have made noteworthy contributions to Georgia’s agricultural landscape, and have been recognized for achievements in agriculture as well as other areas. Former inductees include agricultural history makers Tommy Irvin, former agriculture commissioner; D.W. Brooks, Goldkist founder; J.W. Fanning, former UGA vice-president for public service; and J. Phil Campbell, founding director of Georgia Cooperative Extension. Claud Adams. Adams organized the Boy’s Corn Clubs in Newton County in 1904. These corn clubs are widely known as the predecessors of Georgia 4-H, making Adams the father of 4-H in Georgia. In 1913, the Girl’s Tomato Canning Club, an offshoot of the boy’s agricultural clubs, was created. “His effort to teach 151 boys how to grow a better crop of corn was the beginning of the 4-H program in Georgia,” said Arch Smith, Georgia’s state 4-H leader. “These young students carried back to their parents the message of better agricultural practices, which improved farm production methods in the early 1900s.” Adams extended his impact on the agricultural community when he was elected to the Georgia House of Representatives in 1926. He served on agriculture and education committees; and, in 1932, he was elected commissioner of agriculture. He was inducted into the National 4-H Hall of Fame in 2002. “Adams’ legacy as an educator and public servant lives through the 4-H program,” Smith said, “which today reaches over 184,000 of the youngest students of the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.” Louis Boyd. Boyd was a champion of the animal sciences at UGA in the 1960s and 1970s. He merged the CAES departments of animal science and dairy science and brought in new sources of external funding to strengthen the department and operations at UGA Experiment Stations across the state. “This willingness to think outside the proverbial box led to CAES becoming one of the premier UGA units for generating private support,” said Rep. Chuck Williams, who graduated from the college in 1977. When Boyd retired from UGA in 1992, he was asked to develop and lead the statewide Advisory Board for Agricultural Experiment Stations in Georgia. This board later merged with the Extension Advisory Council, forming the CAES Advisory Council. “In summary, Dr. Louie Boyd epitomizes those traits that qualify one for the Georgia Agricultural Hall of Fame,” Williams said. “The Hall of Fame is Georgia’s singular most significant recognition of exceptional service to agriculture in our great state.” For more information about the Georgia Agricultural Hall of Fame or for details and registration information about the awards ceremony, see caes.uga.edu/alumni.last_img read more

Curing the Chiasso syndrome

first_imgCOMMUNITY of European Railways’ Chairman Heinz Dürr presented plans on April 14 to Transport Commissioner Neil Kinnock for putting into practice the concept of Freight Freeways. The proposals were discussed at a high-level Commission meeting in Brussels on April 17 at which launch of a pilot Freeway was likely to be given the go-ahead. It is not before time. For many years we have advocated dedicated management of international freight routes to give Europe’s railways the ability to stem the haemorrhage of cross-border freight to road hauliers. This may be about to happen.The CER’s report European Rail Freeways: Proposal to the European Commission assumes that separation of infrastructure and operations will proceed to the point where infrastructure managers will be able to offer licensed railway operators paths on a spot basis or over longer periods as part of a market-driven policy. The aim will be to provide ’seamless’ services from ’one-stop shops’ that offer ’consolidated infrastructure tariffs’ – initially the summation of fees for infrastructure use in each country but ultimately packages at attractive prices. The ability to respond flexibly and within hours to customers’ requests for price quotations will be vital to success.Taking two routes between Italy and Benelux countries (one via France, the other through Switzerland and Germany) as an example, the report identifies paths where simple measures can be implemented to cut journey times. Nearly 6h spent at frontiers in one case can be cut to just 1h 15min. Surprisingly, the report finds that it is not so much wagon inspection and administrative delays associated with customs that causes frontier delays, but mismatches between national timetables, although waiting for crews and locomotives, capacity constraints and the low priority given to freight trains also contribute.The first Freeway could be set up on an experimental basis this year – the Netherlands, Germany, Austria, Switzerland and Italy have agreed voluntarily to test the concept. Perhaps it is wishful thinking for the moment, but the rows of wagons waiting at border yards such as Chiasso could become a thing of the past.Through working of locomotives and crews remains another worthwhile objective, and from September Dutch locos and drivers will be able to cross the Belgian border and continue to Antwerpen, so ending the need for four locos and four crew changes on the recently-launched NDX Shuttle between Rotterdam and Antwerpen.The European Shippers’ Council has meanwhile issued its own action plan in response to the European Commission’s White Paper, and suggests that ’the next few years represent a window of opportunity to develop pan-European rail freight that may not be available in the future.’ It calls for ’dismantling of the complex network of co-operative agreements that exists between European railway companies’ which ’potentially threaten the future development of an efficient and competitive rail market’. The ESC also demands better service levels with a named contact for business enquiries and problem solving, door-to-door market pricing, ring-fencing of assets such as locomotives and drivers used for international services and a realistic timetable for full deregulation of European rail freight. The Freeway concept is clearly a welcome step forward – we trust it is not too late. English Welsh & Scottish Railway had informal discussions with NDX Intermodal in March to explore the opportunities for increasing rail traffic between Britain and Germany, Britain’s largest trading partner.As part of the deal that EWS has made with the British government for taking over Railfreight Distribution, the British Railways Board will pay to Eurotunnel the whole of the British share of the Minimum Usage Charge attributable to freight until 2006, not as stated in RG 4.97 p214. olast_img read more