Fredrik Elmqvist – Yggdrasil Gaming – A customer first approach that makes iSENSE

first_img Romania’s ONJN adds 20 sites to blacklist August 14, 2020 Related Articles Share Share CT Gaming bolsters Italian profile with The Betting Coach  August 27, 2020 Yggdrasil Gaming CEO Fredrik Elmqvist spoke to SBC News about building its own platform iSENSE, the challenges of local regulation and the thinking behind its slightly obscure company name.Fredrik Elmqvist, YggdrasilSBC: What does it take to take a gaming developer brand from an unknown entity and newcomer in the space to one that’s well known and respected?FE: Innovation, creativity and hard work. We’ve grown extremely quickly because we identified that taking a customer-first approach to slots provision would prove popular with operators.We understand what operators are looking for in their slots and accordingly have developed tools that help them market and promote games to their customers.This customer-centric focus, including our collection of in-game promotional tools BOOST™ and social sharing tool BRAG, has really set us apart from the competition. It is not enough to create great games anymore; operators are demanding a world-class promotional infrastructure alongside the titles. Our long list of industry-firsts has really powered this stratospheric growth.SBC: How integral has the use of the iSENSE 2.0 platform been to Yggdrasil’s growth?FE: Very early in the Yggdrasil journey, we decided to build our own platform that would smooth integrations and give us the flexibility to innovate. At the time, some considered this a risky move; most games developers didn’t bother with their own platform, and most were still developing games in Flash.We broke from the mould and were among the first to commit wholeheartedly to HTML5. We could only make that decision because of the deep, strategic understanding of the slots sector that we possess.Since then we’ve continued to develop our iSENSE platform. The most recent iteration, iSENSE 2.0+, features a new, minimalistic UI for both mobile and desktop and facilitates in-game deposits, allowing players to go to the deposit screen with a single click without leaving the game client. We will continue to innovate around iSENSE 2.0 as it is central to the Yggdrasil offering.SBC: Game certification is locally regulated and yet you aim to launch each game across your jurisdictions at the same time – how much of a challenge is this and why do you take this approach?FE: This has become less of a challenge and more a case of business as usual for us. We now have licences in the UK, Malta, Gibraltar and Romania, while also certifying games in Italy. We work with many major operators who are operating across multiple jurisdictions. It can be frustrating for these operators to see a game or feature working well in the UK but not be able to roll it out in Italy, for instance.That’s why we aim for simultaneous launches wherever possible, allowing operators to better coordinate marketing campaigns and budgets. Fortunately, we have one of gaming’s strongest legal and regulatory teams at hand to make this possible. We are particularly excited for the launch of our Jungle Books slot in September, which will go live at the same time in all our jurisdictions.SBC: Can you tell us about the choice of the company name – Yggdrasil? FE: We wanted a name that was easy to pronounce! If you look at the B2B gaming space, most opt for combinations of terms such as ‘Play’, ‘Gaming’ or ‘Net’. We felt we needed something more creative to reflect our approach to games.Yggdrasil is an immense tree in Norse mythology that connects nine worlds, and we felt it nicely reflected our Scandinavian roots. It also gave us the freedom to develop a strong brand and challenge conventions on how B2B gaming firms can be marketed.SBC: You were named Slot Provider of the Year for the second year running at the EGR B2B Awards; how important are such accolades? FE: These awards mean a lot because they are acknowledgment from our own industry that Yggdrasil is doing something different. I’ve long believed that if we as a sector do not constantly strive to push forward online casino, the whole industry will suffer.Obviously, our strong commercial performance is vindication that our model works, but these awards show that we are also fulfilling this mission. It is also fantastic that the hard work of the entire team is rewarded – none of this would be possible without the dedication and creativity of Yggdrasilians.SBC: You recently ran the Yggdrasil Coding Challenge in your Polish office – will you be going forward with more initiatives like this?FE: Recruitment is one of the major challenges both Yggdrasil and the broader gaming industry faces. We have grown quickly in Poland, and have recently opened a new office in Krakow city centre, on the site of an old brewery.To recruit the very best talent, we’ve realised we need to place Yggdrasil at the heart of the city’s technology and art communities. Events such as the Coding Challenge are a way of introducing Yggdrasil to these communities in a fun and creative way. These events have been well received so far, and we’ll certainly continue hosting similar functions. TVBET passes GLI test for five live games in Malta and Italy August 25, 2020 Submit StumbleUponlast_img read more

In search of sustainability in Limón What is sustainability

first_imgDr. Khosrow Farahbakhsh is a former professor of sustainable engineering from Canada currently residing near Cahuita, Limón with his wife.They’re living off the grid and produce their own food and host workshops on sustainability. Facebook Comments IntroductionWhat is sustainability Related posts:In search of sustainability in Limón: Challenging our assumptions Court hears testimony from key witnesses in the Jairo Mora murder trial Defendants in Jairo Mora murder trial allegedly attack courthouse guard High-pressure system to bring tall waves to Costa Rica’s Caribbean, North Pacific coastscenter_img I still remember the day I was asked to teach thermodynamics to a class of third year engineering students. I was terrified because I hated the topic when I took it as an undergrad. Years later, it was still one the most dreaded courses among the students.Thankfully, I resisted the urge to argue for an easier course or a smaller class. What I learned in the process was truly transformative.There are two main laws of thermodynamics.The first basically says that the total amount of energy in the universe always stays the same, which seems like good news.The bad news, and that’s where the second law comes in, is that although the quantity of energy remains the same, its quality always degrades. This is like saying that even though I have the same number of muscles in my body, they become less effective as I age.Often called the “second law of everything,” its application is universal. The second law imposes limits on what we can do and perhaps this is why many tend to resent it. You may ask why I started by telling you about the second law of thermodynamics in an article about sustainability.Well, sustainability at its simplest is “the ability to endure,” and to endure, we must understand our limits.Our limits, according to the second law, are defined by the degradation of the quality of resources we depend on. For example, the total amount of water in the world — in all its forms — stays the same but its quality degrades with use or through human impact. Excess rainwater from the spare rainwater harvesting tank provides for a refreshing outdoor shower. (Dr. Khosrow Farahbakhsh/The Tico Times)I often hear folks lament about loss of quality; “they don’t make ’em like they used to,” people say about everything, from food to cars to homes to relationships. In our haste toward progress, we seem to have lost sight of sustaining quality.We have done well in increasing the amount of what we use at the expense of diminishing quality. For example, we now produce more food — measured by calories — than ever before, while nutrition — a measure of food quality — has continued to decline.Overall, we earn more money but our wealth — measured by the buying power — has diminished. We live longer, but many argue that our quality of life — measured by emotional well-being and wealth inequality — has gone down. We are connected to hundreds of people on social networks, but it seems that the quality of relationships has lessened.At first, it may seem obvious that we must pay attention to sustaining the quality of what we do and produce. But in this simple concept lie complex and often poorly explored implications. Part of our resistance in discussing quality is the less tangible nature of it. It is easy to measure and report things as kg, liters, calories, etc., but far more difficult to measure their qualities.After all, qualities like beauty, can be in the eye of the beholder. The lack of consistent ways to measure quality also points to the fact that we have placed less importance on it.For example, when discussing the water crisis, we read that on average, a person in the United States uses 340 liters of water per day. This is alarming, but what’s more alarming and less discussed is that all this water is of a very high quality — highly purified.So, it’s bad enough to use so much water, but it’s even worse to use so much purified water for purposes that often do not demand it: flushing toilets, washing cars, watering lawns, etc. This is also true with energy and other necessities. Excess rainwater from the roof fills a tilapia tank with over 300 fish. (Dr. Khosrow Farahbakhsh/The Tico Times)Sustaining quality has many implications and applications. A simple implication is to try matching the quality of supply to that of demand. For example, using a lower quality water to flush toilets or water gardens results in more sustainable water management practices.It also leads to a more diverse approach to managing water with improved flexibility and adaptability. Of course, this does not negate the attempts to reduce the amount of water used, but it goes far deeper than basic conservation.If you apply this principle to heating and cooling buildings, you may realize that heat pumps are far more sustainable means of climate control than typical air conditioning and conventional heating systems.Incorporating quality into our understanding of sustainability implies that we must find better ways to define and measure quality, and more diverse approaches to prevent its rapid degradation.Although I don’t feel that I have defined sustainability in this short article, I am hopeful that you may find ideas relevant to your own search for sustainability.In the next article, I will offer a basic examination of the assumptions that we often take for granted and how they have a significant impact on our understanding of sustainability.As always, I do appreciate your feedback via [email protected] more of Dr. Farahbakhsh’s “In search of sustainability in Limón” series here:last_img read more