Norfolk Naval Shipyard Undocked USS Maryland

first_img View post tag: Norfolk Naval Shipyard March 8, 2015 View post tag: Naval Back to overview,Home naval-today Norfolk Naval Shipyard Undocked USS Maryland Norfolk Naval Shipyard Undocked USS Maryland View post tag: americas View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Navycenter_img View post tag: Undocked Norfolk Naval Shipyard (NNSY) successfully undocked USS Maryland (SSBN 738) Feb 21.SSBN 738 is now pier-side to finish its Engineered Refueling Overhaul (ERO), a complex, major shipyard availability at the submarine’s mid-life point that enables the submarine to operate for its entire design service life. Maryland has been at NNSY since Dec. 2012.Some of the major jobs during the availability include ship systems overhaul, specifically the replacement of distilling plants with a reverse osmosis unit; replacement of the service turbine generator rotor with a low-sensitivity rotor; installation of an upgraded 500 kilowatt motor generator; and local area network upgrades.Undocking was achieved despite high winds challenging crane service, unusually cold weather preventing the normal process of washing down the dry dock, and several inches of snowfall. When it became apparent the effort might fall short of maintaining the planned undocking date, volunteers pitched in from around the shipyard to assist.In addition to the small amount of production work to still be accomplished on the boat, system testing and certification and Ship’s Force training will be conducted, culminating in sea trials later this year.[mappress mapid=”15323″]Image: US Navy Share this article View post tag: USS Maryland View post tag: Norfolk Authoritieslast_img read more

Paddington: Conditions right to facilitate development

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

Man found dead

first_imgSalvador’s lifeless body was discovered by his aunt Helen Martinez, 56, around 7:35 a.m. on May 9, a police report showed.According to Martinez, Salvador was binge drinking and was not eating his daily meals days before the incident. Initial investigation conducted by the Talisay City police station showed no indication that the man was murdered.Martinez’s body was brought to a mortuary for a “post-mortem examination.”/PN BY MAE SINGUAY AND CYRUS GARDEBACOLOD City – He was found dead inside their house in Barangay Katilingban, Talisay City, Negros Occidental.Police identified him as 46-year-old Raul Salvador.last_img

NBA trade rumors: Pacers would need ‘incredibly significant offer’ to move Myles Turner

first_img“We added a lot of fire power offensively, but we always wanted a team on a good timeline,” Indiana president of basketball operations Kevin Pritchard told reporters in early July. “We feel we have a young team, a very vibrant up-and-coming team that’s willing to get better. We like guys who love the game. You can always tell when guys love the game, they have these incremental improvements every year.”Pacers star Victor Oladipo ruptured his quad in late January and missed the rest of the season. He’s expected to be sidelined to start 2019-20. Pacers’ Darren Collison announces retirement Lakers free agency rumors: Los Angeles has attended workouts of Lance Stephenson, Marreese Speights Indiana is currently planning to start both Turner and Sabonis in the frontcourt next season, coach Nate McMillan said earlier this month.The Pacers finished 2018-19 with a 48-34 record and were swept by the Celtics in the first round of the playoffs. They revamped their backcourt this summer by acquiring Malcolm Brogdon in a sign-and-trade with the Bucks and inking Jeremy Lamb to a three-year, $31.5 million contract.Indiana acquired wing TJ Warren in a deal with the Suns, as well. Victor Oladipo could be out until 2020, Pacers president says Turner averaged 13.3 points and 7.2 rebounds in 74 appearances last season. He also shot a career-best 38.8% from 3-point range and recorded a league-high 2.7 blocks per game.The Pacers originally selected Turner out of Texas with the No. 11 pick in the 2015 draft. He signed a four-year, $72 million extension with the team in October 2018, but could become expandable at some point, as Indiana also has forward Domantas Sabonis, who is entering the final year of his rookie deal. Related News The Pacers seem like they’ll have plenty of options if they decide to move Myles Turner.Indiana received inquiries about a potential deal for the 23-year-old forward before and after the draft, according to a report from SNY, which cites unidentified league sources. Multiple teams, however, “came away with the impression that it would take an incredibly significant offer to land him,” the report says.last_img read more

Visiting Professor From China To Share His Knowledge Of Traditional Chinese…

first_imgSubmitted by Saint Martin’s UniversityLACEY, Wash. – Years before Dr. Heng Li became a medical doctor and Traditional Chinese Medicine physician, he initially had some doubts about TCM.“I did not like TCM, in the beginning. I once thought it was witch doctor’s stuff,” says Li, who recently arrived from the Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (SHUTCM) to spend five weeks as a visiting professor at Saint Martin’s University.“I have an uncle, a top authority on acupuncture in China, who warned me, ‘One day, you’re going to fall in love with Traditional Chinese Medicine.’ And I did!” recalls Li, a fifth-generation TCM physician within his family.Li is assistant director and associate professor at Shanghai University’s China Shanghai International Acupuncture and Moxibustion Training Center. He is also chief doctor in the Acupuncture and Tuina Department of the Municipal Clinic Hua Dong Hospital. Li is sharing his knowledge and passion for Traditional Chinese Medicine, a 2,000-year old discipline, with students enrolled in the Saint Martin’s RN-to-BSN Nursing Program’s introductory course, Traditional Chinese Medicine and Evidence-Based Practice.Li’s visit to Saint Martin’s is the result of the sister university relationship the two schools have shared since 2008. Students at SHUTCM are typically sent to Saint Martin’s for summer cultural exchange activities, and Li is the second visiting professor from SHUTCM to arrive on the Lacey campus.“It is a great honor to have Dr. Li with us. This is a culmination of years of cultural and academic exchange between the two institutions,” said Josephine Yung, vice president of the Office of International Programs and Development at Saint Martin’s.“Dr. Li provides students with the insight, experience, and wisdom of a traditional Chinese medicine doctor (TCM) who uses an approach to health that is multifaceted and able to help individuals achieve wellness,” says Louise Kaplan, director of the RN-to-BSN program. “He is skilled at making complicated theories understandable and brings to life the power of TCM.”For Li, his stint as a guest lecturer is all part of his main mission: to spread accurate information and knowledge about Traditional Chinese Medicine to the Western world, and to more fully integrate TCM with Western medicine. Today, Traditional Chinese Medicine is practiced alongside Western medicine in clinics and hospitals throughout China, and TCM has become a very common practice in the United States.Still, Westerners continue to hold numerous misconceptions about TCM. Li attributes those misunderstandings, in part, to what he describes as the “Americanization and Europeanization” of the TCM approach.“In China,” Li further explains, “Traditional Chinese Medicine doctors are also M.D.s, medical doctors. We first treat a patient just like an M.D. would. Then, following a consultation and an examination, we use Traditional Chinese Medicine to treat their problem.” In the West, many TCM practitioners are not medical doctors, and TCM is not considered to be part of conventional medicine but, rather, alternative and complementary medicine.TCM practices include Tuina (pronounced “twee nah”), a type of body massage, acupuncture, herbal therapy, dietary therapy, cupping (applying a heated cup to the skin), moxibustion (burning and applying a raw herb in conjunction with acupuncture), and Tai Ji and Qi Gong mind-body therapies.One significant difference between the two medical approaches, Li says, is TCM is a more holistic-based medicine than Western medicine. “We not only treat the body, but also the mind and the soul.”Another important difference, according to Li, is Traditional Chinese Medicine places extensive emphasis on individualized treatment. “Just like no two leaves of a tree are exactly alike, the same is true of human beings,” Li says. “We consult with each patient, look at them, examine them, gauge their constitution. In Western medicine, however, the treatment is not so much individualized as it is uniform. For example, the common cold is treated exactly the same in all individuals.”Li believes this emphasis on the individual makes for a “perfect match” between Traditional Chinese Medicine and nursing. “TCM can be transplanted very well into a nursing program because we share that same core value of individualized attention.”“Nurses are with their patients all the time, more than the doctors. Nurses have a great opportunity to observe a patient as an individual person, as we do in Traditional Chinese Medicine.” Along with nursing students, other students enrolled in the introductory course who are considering careers in the health professions will be learning about TCM from Li.In addition to serving as a guest lecturer, Li is assisting Saint Martin’s in planning an exhibit about Traditional Chinese Medicine the two universities are cosponsoring and which is scheduled to be held July 18-20 on the Saint Martin’s campus and within the surrounding community.Saint Martin’s University is an independent four-year, coeducational university located on a wooded campus of more than 300 acres in Lacey, Washington. Established in 1895 by the Catholic Order of Saint Benedict, the University is one of 14 Benedictine colleges and universities in the United States and Canada, and the only one west of the Rocky Mountains. Saint Martin’s University prepares students for successful lives through its 23 majors and seven graduate programs spanning the liberal arts, business, education, nursing and engineering. Saint Martin’s welcomes more than 1,100 undergraduate students and 400 graduate students from many ethnic and religious backgrounds to its Lacey campus, and 300 more undergraduate students to its extension campuses located at Joint Base Lewis-McChord and Centralia College. Visit the Saint Martin’s University website at www.stmartin.edu. Facebook14Tweet0Pin0last_img read more

Adopt-A-Pet Dog of the Week: Snoop Dog

first_imgFacebook151Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Adopt-A-PetMeet Snoop Dog! He is a happy, super-smart, one-year-old, German Shepherd/Rottweiler mix who is in search of his own active and loving family. He has lived successfully with another dog and enjoys playing with mellow dogs (with supervision and after proper introduction). Because of his size (87 pounds) and high energy level, children in his home should be older, dog-savvy, and gentle. Snoop Dog enjoys leash-walks (the more the better), playing tether ball, inventing his own tennis ball games, and swimming.Besides being such a cool dude, he is considered handsome by the volunteers here at the shelter. Volunteers say that his chestnut-colored neck hair really sets off his black muzzle and pearly whites. If you are looking for a very nice dog, and can provide him with love, exercise, further training to satisfy his desire for knowledge, good chow, and a fenced yard, then perhaps we should set a “get-to-know” each other date.If you have further questions or would like to schedule an appointment to meet Snoop Dog in person, please contact the adoption team at Shelton Adopt-a-Pet. Emails are the preferred method of communication.Adopt-A-Pet has many great dogs and always need volunteers. To see all our current dogs, visit the Adopt-A-Pet website, our Facebook page or at the shelter on Jensen Road in Shelton. For more information, email [email protected] or call 360-432-3091.last_img read more

HDMI 21 What you need to know

first_img 61 Photos Samsung Q900 85-inch 8K TV hands-on: A beautiful beast Today’s devices mostly use HDMI version 2.0, or one of its several iterations. We’ll see a handful of TVs in 2019 with full or partial 2.1 implementations. How does that affect you? Not much. You can’t upgrade your current TV to 2.1 spec, and there are no HDMI 2.1 sources yet. This update is quite forward-thinking and takes into account formats and resolutions that won’t be widely available for years. However, if you’re considering certain new TVs in 2019 and beyond, you should make sure you understand the limitations of 2.0, and what 2.1 will offer if you choose to wait on your TV purchase. Sarah Tew/CNET The short version Don’t like reading (much)? Allow me to fire some HDMI 2.1 bullets. The physical connectors and cables the same as today’s HDMI.Improved bandwidth from 18 Gbps (HDMI 2.0) to 48 Gbps (HDMI 2.1).Can carry resolutions up to 10K, frame rates up to 120fps.New cables are required for higher resolutions and/or frame rates.The first products will arrive in 2019.The increased resolution and frame rate possibilities are a futurist’s dream: 4K50/604K100/1205K50/605K100/1208K50/608K100/12010K50/6010K100/120You should be able to get 4K/60, and a basic 8K/30, with current cables, but the rest will need an Ultra High Speed HDMI cable. More on these new cables below.On the color front, 2.1 supports BT.2020 and 16 bits per color. This is the same as HDMI 2.0a/b, and is what makes wide color gamut possible. Those are just the highlights, though. Read on for the details. 47 OK, let’s get this done up front. Yes, there’s a new cable with HDMI 2.1, but you don’t need to upgrade. At least not yet. HDMI 2.1 brings new features and a lot more bandwidth to the venerable cable and connection. However, it’s going to be many years before you’ll see it on the average television. If you’ve got your eye on a fancy new high-end TV though, there are some things you should keep in mind. We’ll get to those further down. The good news is, the connector itself isn’t changing. Your current cables will work even when you finally get a device with HDMI 2.1. You will need new cables to take advantage of the new features and resolutions possible with 2.1 but again, it will be years before those become commonplace. All about the bandwidth When you increase the resolution of a TV signal, the amount of data of that signal goes up. A 3,820×2,160 4K UltraHD signal sent over HDMI is roughly 4 times the amount of data as an HD 1,920×1,080 signal. If you think of cables as pipes, you need a bigger pipe to transmit a 4K signal than a 1080p one. The same is true if you increase the frame rate. You need a bigger pipe to transmit a 60 frame-per-second image than you do a 24fps image of the same resolution. More images per second, more data. The best TVs of CES 2019 Home Entertainment Audio Computers Related Info Now playing: Watch this: 2:30 How HDR works Wide Color Gamut Do you need new HDMI cables for HDR? Why all HDMI cables are the same Though most current HDMI cables can handle nearly all of today’s content, the TV industry never sits still. Down the road we might see higher frame rate TVs, and we’re already starting to see higher resolutions, like 8K TVs. Don’t worry, they’re not going to be common any time soon either. Even way farther down the road, maybe we’ll even see 10K TVs. This is predominantly what HDMI 2.1 is for. Not for 99 percent of people now, but for the future versions of ourselves who want to send their 4K TVs native 120fps material, or their 8K TVs 60fps material. Far future versions of ourselves playing content that doesn’t currently exist… Unless you’re a gamer. Personal computers, and high-end gaming rigs at that, are the only current source that can output 4K at more than 60fps. The Xbox One X can do 120fps, but only at lower resolutions and therefore doesn’t require HDMI 2.1. Other than gaming, there’s basically no current content that requires the bandwidth of HDMI 2.1. Since there’s no indication of movies or TV moving towards higher framerates, except for perhaps sports, the higher framerates possible with the HDMI 2.1 specification are likely to go unused by most people. Yes, in theory you could finally send your 120 Hz TV a 120 Hz signal (which isn’t how they work now), but again, there’s no non-gaming 120 Hz content now or planned, so this is pretty unlikely. Already we’re seeing 8K TVs, and to get fully-featured 8K content to the TV, you will need HDMI 2.1. Since even 4K is higher resolution than most people need, given common TV sizes and seating distances, 8K is really overkill. However, TV manufacturers love increasing resolution because it’s relatively easy to improve, and makes for an easy marketing push as “better.” It’s inevitable 8K TVs will be common, but that’s many years away. Plus, those TVs will be better and cheaper than today’s models.  It’s worth keeping in mind that there are currently no public discussions about 8K sources, so even if you get an 8K TV, you’ll have nothing to plug into it except your current 1080p and 4K sources. So if you want to get an 8K TV now, don’t worry about finding new cables that will pass 8K resolutions (more on these below). Since there likely will be 8K sources eventually, you should definitely make sure your 8K TV has HDMI 2.1 so you can use them. If you don’t, you run the risk of your expensive 8K TV not being compatible with whatever 8K source finally arrives. This is exactly what we saw with early 4K TVs, none of which are able to play content from 4K Blu-ray players or 4K media streamers.  Useful additions While the new resolutions and frame rates get all the headline buzz, but there are some other improvements that will be more useful for most people. “Dynamic HDR” is an amusing name for a big improvement. High dynamic range is our favorite picture-quality improvement since high-definition itself, and right now the most common HDR format is HDR10. It uses something called metadata to tell the TV how to treat a piece of HDR content. In the current version of HDR10, that metadata is applied once and once only, on a per-program basis. As in, you get One Set of Data to Rule Them All. Dynamic HDR can vary how each scene or even each frame looks, not just the program as a whole, to better suit that scene (or frame). Here’s a video that shows some examples (but remember, you’re viewing it on non-HDR screens). Basically, a dark scene with bright highlights (campfire at night) would take advantage of HDR differently than a bright scene with dark areas (someone under a pier on a beach at noon). If these scenes were in one movie, static HDR would treat these the same, while Dynamic HDR would let each scene look its best. HDMI 2.1 enables Dynamic HDR, but it also needs to be present in the content to work.  Dolby Vision, HDR10+, and certain flavors of Technicolor’s Advanced HDR, already uses dynamic metadata and can pass over a existing HDMI connections. This aspect of HDMI 2.1 ensures going forward this will be possible without a proprietary format (HDR10 has no licencing fees).  hdmi-hdr3imagecomparison.jpgRemember, you’re viewing an SDR image on an SDR display, so this is for illustration purposes only. The idea of Dynamic HDR is for each scene to be able to take advantage of HDR to look its best. Current Static HDR can only have one set “look” for the entire movie or show. HDMI Forum “eARC” is the next evolution of Audio Return Channel, which allows simpler connections between AV devices like TVs, video players and sound systems. eARC has support for “the most advanced audio formats such as object-based audio, and enables advanced audio signal control capabilities including device auto-detect.” Basically this means Dolby Atmos over ARC at full resolution, which you currently can’t do. However, your current cables probably can. If, in the future, you buy an HDMI 2.1-compatible TV and an HDMI 2.1-compatible sound bar, your current High Speed cables should be able to transmit eARC. Audio doesn’t require the bandwidth that video does. hdmi-gamemodevrr.jpg HDMI Forum “Game Mode VRR” is a potentially interesting feature for gamers. It allows for “variable refresh rate, which enables a 3D graphics processor to display the image at the moment it is rendered for more fluid and better detailed gameplay, and for reducing or eliminating lag, stutter and frame tearing.” In other words, there will be less of a buffer for frames while the video card creates the image so you won’t have to choose between image artifacts and input lag, ideally reducing both. If this sounds familiar, it’s because it’s similar to Nvidia’s G-Sync and AMD’s FreeSync, both only available over DisplayPort. We wrote more about this feature in How HDMI 2.1 makes big-screen 4K PC gaming even more awesome. Game Mode VRR will also work over current cables (between two pieces of 2.1-compatible gear), though if you’re trying to push greater-than-4K60 video, you’ll need an Ultra High Speed HDMI cable.  Speaking of that… New cable For the first time in a while, there is a new cable. It looks… well, it looks the same as the old cable. There’s no new connector; that stays the same. These were originally called “48G” cables since they will have 48 Gbps bandwidth, though now they’re officially called Ultra High Speed HDMI cables. These have roughly 2.6 times the 18 Gbps that the better-made HDMI cables have now. These cables are backward compatible, so they’ll work with all your other HDMI gear (at whatever speed that gear operates). hdmi-bandwidthcomparison.jpgA visual representation of how much more bandwidth the upcoming 48G cables can handle. 18 Gbps is plenty for nearly all current content. HDMI Forum There’s no reason to buy an Ultra High Speed HDMI cables cable now. The first generation of these cables are rare, overpriced, and do nothing for your current gear. When, down the road, you have gear that can take advantage of the extra bandwidth or features, then you should upgrade. They’ll be cheaper then, too. Check out What HDMI cable do you need? for some cheap options now. We found out some other interesting HDMI cable info at CES 2019, like how longer, copper cables might not work, and how there was no compliance testing yet. The latter means that cables labeled Ultra High Speed in 2018 and early 2019 might work, and they might not. HDMI Licencing has no way of testing them yet. Yet another reason to hold off buying new cables.  When? We’ll start to see TVs with HDMI 2.1 in 2019, with more in 2020 and beyond. However, not all TVs that claim HDMI 2.1-compatibility are actually capable of everything we’ve discussed. HDMI Licensing, the organization in charge of the HDMI specification, is allowing companies to claim 2.1 compatibility even if they don’t support every aspect. So a TV that can’t accept 8K/60, but has eARC and Variable Refresh Rate, still can claim it’s 2.1… as long as the company specifies what aspects of 2.1 it can support. This is bound to lead to confusion, as it will no longer be possible just to check what version of the connection a product has, but also what features of 2.1 the product may or may not support. Ideally these aspects will be easy to spot, but given how many features and tech specs every TV already has, this unquestionably makes things just that little bit more difficult.  If you are buying an 8K TV, don’t expect the manufacturer to add any HDMI 2.1 features the TV lacks when new. It’s possible that a firmware update might give your TV those capabilities if it doesn’t out of the box, but then, it might not. TV manufacturers are very hit-or-miss when it comes to adding features to older televisions. Sometimes it’s not physically possible, other times it’s not economically possible.  HDMI 2.1 is like a brand new 10-lane highway in the middle of the countryside. There’s not much reason for it right now, but it offers an easy way to expand in the future. If you’re not considering an 8K TV then it’s a 10-lane highway in the countryside of a different state or country. Cool, but not something that will impact your immediate future. Got a question for Geoff? First, check out all the other articles he’s written on topics such as why all HDMI cables are the same, LED LCD vs. OLED, why 4K TVs aren’t worth it and more. Still have a question? Tweet at him @TechWriterGeoff then check out his travel photography on Instagram. He also thinks you should check out his sci-fi novel and its sequel. Comments Tags 4K TVs HDMI Share your voicelast_img read more

Apple Music Takes on Spotify With Free Analytics Tool for Artists

first_img Popular on Variety The Big Shift: Why Record Companies Need to Pivot From a B2B to a B2C Model (Column) The product has also integrated Shazam data (including most Shazamed cities and countries) into the artist’s profile. Other highlights include the ability to view the average number of daily listeners by country, city or song; “Plays from Playlists,” with detailed information about the playlists an artists’ songs have been added to and where those songs are positioned in the playlists; and weekly data to cover music industry standard release weeks to enable artists to better monitor their week-to-week stats.Artists can sign up and claim their account at https://artists.apple.com/ ×Actors Reveal Their Favorite Disney PrincessesSeveral actors, like Daisy Ridley, Awkwafina, Jeff Goldblum and Gina Rodriguez, reveal their favorite Disney princesses. Rapunzel, Mulan, Ariel,Tiana, Sleeping Beauty and Jasmine all got some love from the Disney stars.More VideosVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9Next UpJennifer Lopez Shares How She Became a Mogul04:350.5x1x1.25×1.5x2xLive00:0002:1502:15 On Thursday Apple Music brought its free analytics tool, Apple Music for Artists, out of beta and officially into the world. The product, available to verified musicians and their reps, is available on desktop or iOS devices and uses Apple Music streaming data to give artists a picture of their global impact and industry milestones.It’s metrics update daily, allowing users to see who is listening to their music and videos, how often, and where they’re listening from. Like similar tools on Spotify and other streaming services, the objective is to help artists tour and target their promotions in areas where they’re most popular — and to discover new areas where they might not have realized they were popular.According to the announcement, the service “provides a level of detail beyond anything currently available including:center_img Related Access to all stream plays including algorithmic radio, as well as song and album sales from iTunes *something only Apple Music can provideIn-depth views of everything by song, album, playlist, location, fan demographics, and moreVisibility into which Apple Music or curator playlists are driving the most streams of their music, how those trends change over time, as well as the demographics of the fans they resonate the most with.Insights into where their fans are growing and the ability to track streams and sales all the way down to the city level in over 100 countries. This makes it possible to easily plan tours, cater set lists for fans in each city, vary promotions by region, or uncover unknown areas of popularity around the world. Apple Music Launches ‘Rap Life’ Playlistlast_img read more

Baker Institute event to explore the water and energy nexus Oct 14

first_imgAddThis ShareMEDIA ADVISORYDavid [email protected] [email protected] Institute event to explore the water and energy nexus Oct. 14HOUSTON – (Oct. 6, 2015) – Leading government and private sector experts will explore the changing legal, international and industry landscape surrounding water and energy, including industry implications of the Environmental Protection Agency’s new rule on Waters of the United States, at Rice University’s Baker Institute for Public Policy Oct. 14.Hosted by the Baker Institute’s Center for Energy Studies, the conference is free and open to the public, but registration is required.Who: Speakers include Todd Werpy, chief technology officer at Archer Daniels Midland Co.; Kate Zerrenner, manager of energy-water initiatives at the Environmental Defense Fund; Roy Hartstein, vice president of strategic solutions at Southwestern Energy; Kathleen Jackson, member of the Texas Water Development Board; and Michael Teague, Oklahoma secretary of energy and environment.For a full list of speakers and the agenda, see http://bakerinstitute.org/events/1744.What: A conference titled “Water and Energy: Challenges and Opportunities in the Nexus.”When: Wednesday, Oct. 14, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.Where: Rice University, Baker Hall, Doré Commons, 6100 Main St.The conference’s goal is to advance the conversation around leading developments in water and energy in the legal, international and industrial contexts, according to organizers. Conference speakers will discuss industry implication of the Waters of the United States rule and how other nations are thinking about problems in the water-energy nexus. They will also discuss advances and challenges in recycling and reusing produced water from upstream oil and gas operations in addition to a range of other topics.Members of the news media who want to attend should RSVP to Jeff Falk, associate director of national media relations at Rice, at [email protected] or 713-348-6775.The public must register to attend this event at http://bakerinstitute.org/events/1744. A live webcast will be available at the registration page.For a map of Rice University’s campus with parking information, go to www.rice.edu/maps. Media are advised to park in the Central Campus Garage.-30-Follow the Baker Institute via Twitter @BakerInsitute.Follow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNews.Founded in 1993, Rice University’s Baker Institute ranks among the top 10 university-affiliated think tanks in the world. As a premier nonpartisan think tank, the institute conducts research on domestic and foreign policy issues with the goal of bridging the gap between the theory and practice of public policy. The institute’s strong track record of achievement reflects the work of its endowed fellows, Rice University faculty scholars and staff, coupled with its outreach to the Rice student body through fellow-taught classes — including a public policy course — and student leadership and internship programs. Learn more about the institute at www.bakerinstitute.org or on the institute’s blog, http://blogs.chron.com/bakerblog.last_img read more