Central Oregon Employment Shows Deschutes County Continuing to Grow

first_img Google+ 0 Central Oregon Employment Shows Deschutes County Continuing to Grow Pinterest E-Headlines LinkedIn Share. Twittercenter_img By CBN Email on May 20, 2014 There was no significant change to local unemployment levels in Central Oregon. Hiring was mixed across the region with Deschutes County experiencing moderate job growth, Crook County seeing no change, while Jefferson County shed about 50 jobs on a seasonally adjusted basis. Nationally unemployment levels saw a large drop down to 6.3 percent from 6.7 percent in March. Oregon’s rate was unchanged at 6.9 percent.  Crook County:There was little change in Crook County’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate in April, down to 10.8 percent from 10.9 percent in March. However the unemployment levels dropped significantly from April 2013 when it was 12.6 percent.  Total nonfarm employment rose by 90 jobs in April, which is typical this time of year.As expected, April ushered in seasonal hiring in leisure and hospitality (+40); construction (+30); and the federal government (+20).  Over-the-year employment growth dipped below 1 percent for the first time in 2014. This slowdown is primarily due to a loss of 30 jobs in professional and business services, as well as, about 20 fewer jobs in bothretail trade and leisure and hospitality. Educational and health services (+60) experienced rapid growth, up 10.9 percent from last year.Deschutes County (Bend MSA): Deschutes County’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was little changed in April, down to 8.4 percent from 8.5 percent in March. The seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was 9.9 percent in April 2013, a statistically significant drop. Preliminary estimates from the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) for the Bend metropolitan area show an increase of 1,180 jobs in April, which is greater than the gain of 720 jobs typically expected this time of year. Seasonal hiring ramped up in leisure and hospitality (+270); retail trade (+200); and mining, logging, and construction (+140). Strong hiring continued in professional and business services (+360).  Over-the-year employment growth continued to slow in April, however there are still over 1,400 more jobs in the county compared to this time last year. Gains were spread across a variety of industries with educational and health services (+330) and accommodation and food services (+300) gaining the most jobs. Deschutes County’s fastest growing industry is wholesale trade, up 8.2 percent or 140 jobs.  Jefferson County:There was essentially no change in Jefferson County’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate in April, down to 9.7 percent from 9.8 percent in March. Over the past year unemployment levelsdroppedfrom 10.9 percent.  Jefferson County only gained60 jobs in April when a gain of 110 jobs would typically be expected this time of year. The only significant employment gains were in Indian tribal government, which added 50 jobs in April. The private-sector employment picture was little changed in April. Over-the-year employment growth continues to slow with the county only adding about 40 jobs or 0.7 percent since April 2013. Manufacturing continues to see strong growth (+70). Overall, there was no change in private-sector employment with significant losses in professional and business services (-30); educational and health services (-30); and leisure and hospitality (-30). Government expanded by 40 jobs from last April with most of those gains from Indian tribal government. Quarterly Benchmarking: Effective with the release of April preliminary data, recent nonfarm payroll employment estimates were revised using employment counts from employer tax records. Formerly, the data were revised annually.These estimates will be revised as new data from businesses becomes available. The next Central Oregon Employment Situation with preliminary data for May 2014 will be released on Monday, June23. Facebook Tumblrlast_img read more