Sewanee seeks untold story of university’s ties to slavery, segregation…

first_img Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA The University of the South in Sewanee, Tennessee, hosts a dedication ceremony May 16, 1940, for a memorial to Confederate Gen. Edmund Kirby-Smith, who also taught math at Sewanee after the Civil War. Photo courtesy of University Archives and Special Collections: The University of the South[Episcopal News Service] Sewanee: The University of the South in Tennessee sits atop a plateau, and students interested in viewing the expanse of valley to the west are invited to hike some of the more than 50 miles of trails across the campus, known as the Domain.Seeing those landscapes is enough to know their beauty. “The stretch of Perimeter Trail from Morgan’s Steep to Armfield Bluff affords wonderful views to the valley and into deep coves,” one professor recommended in a 2008 Sewanee Magazine article profiling the best day hikes on Sewanee’s 13,000 acres.The names given these places, however, reflect a time when Sewanee’s early leaders openly embraced a belief in white racial superiority. Oliver Morgan was a member of one of the most prominent slaveholding families in Louisiana, and John Armfield was part owner in a leading U.S. slave-trading operation.Both men contributed to the original founding of the university by dioceses of the Episcopal Church in 1857. Church leaders across the South who supported the new university saw it as their Christian duty to help maintain the slaveholding order, according to Woody Register, a Sewanee history professor who is leading a six-year research project on Sewanee’s early ties to slavery and segregation.“The University of the South was founded to be the slavers’ university, to represent the interests of a slaveholding society,” Register said, and that mission was clearly seen through a Christian lens that saw slavery as morally defensible. “You can’t separate its church purposes, its religious purposes, from the social purposes of the university.”That vision never materialized. By the time Sewanee opened its doors in 1868, the Civil War was over and slavery had been abolished. How the University of the South recalibrated its mission in that new order is one focus of the university-sponsored Project on Slavery, Race, and Reconciliation.“I like to think of this as there being two foundings,” Vice Chancellor John McCardell Jr. told Episcopal News Service. “One, the founding that failed, and one that succeeded.” The founding that succeeded, he added, was not driven by a desire to maintain slavery.Even 150 years after that second founding, those who fought to maintain slavery are still honored at Sewanee, and such public honors, especially those bestowed on Confederate army leaders, have faced increased scrutiny at Sewanee and institutions around the United States in the aftermath of deadly violence at a white supremacist, neo-Confederate rally in Charlottesville, Virginia last summer.Those events in August sparked a national debate over Confederate imagery in public spaces. Register’s team at Sewanee, barely a month into its research, was asked to provide information supporting university administrators’ decision to relocate a prominent memorial honoring Confederate Gen. Edmund Kirby-Smith, who taught at Sewanee after the Civil War.Re-examining Confederate symbols, though numerous on campus, is not the sole focus of Sewanee’s project. The Project on Slavery, Race, and Reconciliation, part of a coalition of three dozen universities known as the Universities Studying Slavery, aims to expand the narrative of the university’s founding and its first century beyond what can be told through Sewanee’s own archival documents.Register’s team is “casting our net much more broadly” for new details of that untold story by examining records kept across the South in places where the university received its early financial support – including in some of the 28 Episcopal dioceses that still own and govern the university today.The project’s work also is integrated into Sewanee’s academic life, with several students serving on the project working group.“If we can acknowledge the past, then we can progress, so I think this is a huge step,” said Jonathan Brown, a senior who is on the project’s group.Brown, an American studies major, is black and grew up in Silver Spring, Maryland. He chose to attend Sewanee after receiving a scholarship, and he didn’t know much about the university’s history at first. In his four years there, he fell in love with Sewanee and its close-knit community while having the opportunity to learn more about its past.With the Project on Slavery, Brown has helped organize some of its public events while preparing the younger students on the team for the work they will do in years ahead.“I’ve loved every moment of it,” he said of his work on the project. “I’m really excited to see where it takes off.”Silver Spring is a suburb of Washington, D.C., and Brown recalls conversations with his parents about the research Georgetown University was conducting on its historical complicity with slavery, including its sale in 1838 of 272 slaves to keep the university running.The Episcopal Church has taken similar steps to confront its past. Presiding Bishop Michael Curry has made racial reconciliation one of his top priorities, most notably through the “Becoming Beloved Community” initiative. And General Convention has passed numerous resolutions on the subject, including a 2006 resolution about slavery.“The Episcopal Church acknowledges its history of participation in this sin and the deep and lasting injury which the institution of slavery and its aftermath have inflicted on society and on the Church,” the resolution said, and it called on each diocese to compile evidence of that complicity.Racial reconciliation also is a goal of Sewanee’s project, as it reaches beyond the campus to foster discussion in the community about these issues. One recent example was the Feb. 19 forum titled “Reading and Rereading History” featuring two Sewanee professors discussing symbols of racial injustice on campus. The event was held off campus to encourage a mix of students and residents to participate.“I certainly think the what we’re doing here is consistent with what the church is seeking to do,” said McCardell, the vice chancellor, who is an Episcopalian.Research on roots in slavery gains in urgencySewanee has grappled for years with how to balance an appreciation for its history with a desire to confront and move beyond its past ties to racial oppression.A 2005 New York Times story detailed changes Sewanee was making at that time to appeal to a more geographically and racially diverse pool of potential students – changes dismissed as destructive or unnecessary by some alumni. Despite the removal of some overtly racist symbols, administrators told the Times they had no intention of getting rid of certain other landmarks that had been fixtures on the campus for decades, such as the Kirby-Smith memorial.The university’s 2012 strategic plan also emphasized a commitment to fostering a diverse campus community, and in the 2015-2016 academic year, Sewanee created several task forces of students and faculty to study ways of fulfilling that commitment.That effort came just as the national conversation around Confederate symbols had deepened after a June 2015 shooting in Charleston, South Carolina, in which a gunman with Confederate sympathies murdered nine people at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church.In fall 2015, Sewanee removed a portrait of Leonidas Polk from public display. Polk was the Episcopal bishop who led the drive to create the University of the South before joining the Confederate army as a general during the Civil War. (He was killed in battle.) A portrait known as “Sword Over the Gown” shows Polk vested as a bishop but with his Confederate uniform draped over a chair and his military sword beside him.The portrait, said to be a copy of the original, was moved from Convocation Hall to Sewanee’s archives, sparking a mix of support and criticism.The following year, Sewanee joined the Universities Studying Slavery. McCardell and other top administrators asked Register in August 2016 to lead the Sewanee Project on Slavery, and over the winter, Register and a graduate student, Tanner Potts, drafted a plan for the six-year project that launched in July 2017.Register expected to spend two or three years researching the history of the campus’s tributes to Kirby-Smith and other Confederate and slaveholding figures, inviting input from all sides before recommending any changes.By fall 2017, however, the work had grown in urgency.“We did not anticipate the way in which events would develop over the summer, and part of our mission all along was to evaluate and figure out what to do with the many, many memorials and monuments to the antebellum slaveholding order and the Confederacy on our campus,” Register said. “The events of Charlottesville accelerated the schedule for doing that.”Other Episcopal institutions, too, have fought to keep pace with current events while assessing what to do about Confederate symbols. Washington National Cathedral had embarked on what it thought would be a two-year process of discerning whether to keep or remove images of the Confederate flag in its stained-glass windows. After the violence in Charlottesville, the dean announced abruptly last fall that no further deliberation was needed, and the flags were removed.The clashes between hate groups and counterprotesters in Charlottesville centered around the city’s decision to take down a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. Soon after those clashes, McCardell said he was contacted by a descendant of Kirby-Smith asking that the memorial at Sewanee be moved to the campus cemetery, where it would be less likely to become a flashpoint for controversy.Edmund Kirby-Smith was a Confederate general who later taught mathematics at the University of the South at Sewanee, Tennessee, where this monument to the general is located. It was moved last year from this location to the university cemetery. Photo: Caroline CarsonMcCardell moved forward with that plan in the fall, after consulting with Register’s team about the history of the memorial. It had been proposed in the 1920s by the Daughters of the Confederacy, but because fundraising was difficult during the Great Depression, it wasn’t installed until 1940, Register said.His team confirmed the memorial was on campus property, dispelling rumors that the land had been given away long ago. And research into the memorial’s dedication ceremony, which bore a military motif and featured display of the Confederate battle flag, indicated that Kirby-Smith was honored more for his Civil War record than for his later career as a math professor.The university moved the memorial to the cemetery with little fanfare.“The idea is to understand things as best we can before we act,” Register said.Studying the past to shape Sewanee’s futureRegister, a native of Alabama, graduated from Sewanee in 1980 and has taught history at the university for 26 years. (He received his doctorate from Brown University, an early trailblazer among the Universities Studying Slavery.)As Register expanded his understanding of Sewanee’s ties to slavery and segregation, he gradually worked some of those details into his teaching and scholarly articles. About three years ago, he helped produce an exhibition on Sewanee manhood called “Founded to Make Men” that foreshadowed his present work with the Project on Slavery.“It changed how I thought about the history of the university,” Register said.His research suggested that Sewanee originally was conceived as a place where Southern men would be taught to be leaders of the slaveholding order in the antebellum South. He disputes criticisms that learning more about that history and its representation in present-day landmarks is a step toward “destroying the past.”“It’s quite the opposite,” he said. “We’re trying to better understand the past, and there’s a lot here that we need to know more about.”As examples, Register noted that some dormitories are named for Confederate military figures, such as Charles Todd Quintard, a Confederate chaplain who later became the Diocese of Tennessee’s first post-war bishop and served as Sewanee’s vice chancellor. (Quintard is celebrated by the Episcopal Church every Feb. 16.) Another dormitory is named for Josiah Gorgas, a Confederate general who later served as president of the University of Alabama.“I think Woody’s approach to this has been quite sound and in the best tradition of academia,” McCardell said. “Let’s study the issue from all angles. … The perspective of time ought never to be underestimated. The decisions made in the heat of the moment are not necessary the wisest decisions.”The work of the Project on Slavery has revealed how many connections to Sewanee’s antebellum roots are found scattered around the campus, sometimes in subtle ways, as with the various place names taken from the men who gave money for the university’s founding.“The Kirby-Smith memorial is an easy one to address, in a way,” Register said. “There are others. Our campus is paved with monuments and memorials.”Will changing the names of places on campus help achieve that goal? Register’s team is not yet ready to make recommendations, though there is a broad spectrum of options available, from changing names and moving monuments to creating digital resources that provide deeper historical context for landmarks that evoke an earlier era.“The most important thing first is that we make this history known and not make the argument that, that was long ago and it doesn’t matter,” Register said. “It does matter, and it should matter to us today.“And to be honest and forthright about it is critical, especially critical if you’re going to understand what having this history does for your thinking about the mission and the goals of the university.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Rector Pittsburgh, PA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem March 7, 2018 at 12:58 am Descendants of slavers, and of Sewanee alum who celebrated that tradition, should indeed repent, seek to atone, seek to repair in behalf of our ancestors and to make amends for pride and privileges derived from slavery. The depth and perpetuation of our racism is manifested when whites presume to choreography reconciliation. I recommend dropping that term from the project. Sons and daughters of Sewanee alums are not the ANC. March 6, 2018 at 5:20 pm I’m greatful Sewanee is undertaking this project. I was christened in the Church of England. My mother chose not to worship as Anglican due to racism. When I moved to America as a young girl, I grew up in a different religion. I have since returned. America has the grave sin of slavery in its history. If we don’t talk about it, we will get nowhere. As a black woman, I am torn between having institutions tear down symbols or leave them up for historical value and discussion. I look forward to what The Episcopal Church is doing. Sewanee seeks untold story of university’s ties to slavery, segregation in reconciliation project Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Michelle Samuels says: Tags Rector Smithfield, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Music Morristown, NJ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Advocacy Peace & Justice, Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH David A. Elliott III says: Brenda Woemmel says: Lallie Lloyd says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA March 8, 2018 at 3:34 am Thank you for presenting this work. As a former long time EFM mentor (and graduate), Sewanee holds a special place in mhy heart. We need to be doing this in every corner of tne church. Theological Education Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Job Listing Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Hopkinsville, KY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab By David PaulsenPosted Mar 6, 2018 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Dana Strong (Nick) Wyman says: March 7, 2018 at 1:13 am I was pleased to learn that Sewanee is pursuing historical research to present an accurate picture of the institution’srole and involvement with slavery, racism and discrimination. I look forward to the new scholarship and changes Sewanee will make to reconcile our Episcopal past with our goal to cleanse our soul as an institution for the 21st Century. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 March 6, 2018 at 5:11 pm Thank you for another great article by David Paulsen! I’m eager to see how we as a church grow and are transformed as we develop a shared and historically accurate understanding about how some benefited from slavery, others resisted slavery, and many were brutalized in ways that continue to harm individuals, families, communities, and our nation today. I wonder what our Episcopal independent schools would learn about their founders and histories were they to embark on similar journeys? March 7, 2018 at 1:06 am P S my dad, Sam Madison Powell loved Sewanee. He went to the academy and the college. The former presiding bishop, David Rose, who went on to seminary, was his classmate and good friend. Rector Tampa, FL Dianne Aid says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Albany, NY Rector Shreveport, LA March 6, 2018 at 4:20 pm Thanks for the catch, Peggy, and the history lesson. We’ve fixed that spelling. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME March 6, 2018 at 9:18 pm It is clear to me that all of this is being approached in a thoughtful, scholarly, sound manner. It is vital for us to be honest about our past, both with ourselves and with others. Sewanee is a distinguished institution of higher learning, with a national reputation that we want to maintain. The seminary has historically been, and I think continues to be, the nurturing place of important clergy leaders of the Episcopal Church — people who have made a great difference in our quest for justice and grace in the country, in the name of Jesus Christ and HIs Good News. It may be that some of the symbols on campus should be removed or changed and that others may remain, with a recast narrative to explain them and conscientiously celebrate their meaning to the university for good. This project is in good hands, and all of us should support it. Press Release Service Comments (10) March 6, 2018 at 4:06 pm The spring in Silver Spring, MD is singular. The town was named for ONE spring. Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Peggy Goldsmith says: Rector Bath, NC David Paulsen says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Knoxville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Martinsville, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Belleville, IL Rector Collierville, TN Racial Justice & Reconciliation, Submit a Press Release Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Peggy Dobbins says: Featured Events March 6, 2018 at 5:09 pm I attended both the College and the Seminary. For my Honors Degree(Optime Merins)from Seminary in 1969, I submitted a paper entitled “The Church and the Black Man” examining the Church’s relationship to slavery and the civil rights movement. It changed my life and much has changed since then Peggy Dobbins says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Comments are closed. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 last_img read more

GOSH cookery book is reprinted for third time

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis  23 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tagged with: Celebrity Trading GOSH cookery book is reprinted for third time A book about cooking and hospitality, sold in aid of Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) and The Starlight Children’s Foundation, has sold so many copies that its is being reprinted for the third time.‘A Life in Food, a personal perspective on cooking and hospitality by the pioneer of boutique hotels’, was written by Bea Tollman, the Founder and President of Red Carnation Hotels. It has sold nearly 8,000 copies so far. The full selling price is being donated to the charities, in particular to benefit patients with kidney conditions.The illustrated account of Tollman’s 50 year career is part cookery book, part autobiography.Bea Tollman said: “Over the years, many people have asked me how I learned to cook, and where my journey with both fine dining and comfort food began. A Life in Food is the result. I hope it brings to others a little of the pleasure which cooking has given me all my life.”A Life in Food sells for £25. Howard Lake | 29 August 2012 | News About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

WHS homecoming parade starts soon. Fall Festival activities begin Friday

first_imgby Tracy McCue, Sumner Newscow — The 2014 Wellington Fall Festival will be held Oct. 3-4 in conjunction with the High School Spirit Week and WHS homecoming which is September 29-Oct. 4. The festivities begin at 6:30 p.m. with the parade downtown. The pep rally and bonfire will follow at the Wellington High School.The students have been holding their Spirit Week activities throughout the week and businesses have decorated their store fronts and windows to show their Crusader Spirit as well. There is a prize of $50 in Wellington Bucks to the best decorated business. The WHS Homecoming game will be held on Friday against Andale.  Prior to the game, the Chamber will host a tailgate party right outside the stadium entrance which will include the 25th Annual Chili Cook-Off. Teams will pre-make their chili and then bring them down to Sellers Park on Friday to be judged and sampled.Tasting kits for the chili will be sold for $2 with a bottle of water costing $1 extra. Folks are encouraged to come down and hang out before the game, taste the various chili and then cheer on the Crusaders to beat the Andale Indians.Then….On Saturday the Barbecue Cook-off will get underway in Sellers Park by the Railroad Museum along with all the other activities including the Chamber Salsa Challenge, the Alzheimer’s Walk, the fundraiser food court, arts and crafts, kids games and bouncy’s and a lip synch contest by the Young Professionals.The Bank of Commerce has graciously signed on as our Premiere Sponsor! The Chamber officials and members appreciate their dedication and commitment to the Chamber and the Crusaders!last_img read more

Ghostriders double Leafs to remain undefeated

first_imgBy Bruce Fuhr,The Nelson Daily Sports EditorThomas Abenante scored his second goal of the game on a penalty shot to spark the visiting Fernie Ghostriders to a 4-2 Kootenay International Junior Hockey League victory over the Leafs Saturday night at the NDCC Arena in Nelson.It was the second game of the weekend Nelson played without head coach Chris Shaw, suspended by the KIJHL for using “non-approved” players. Shaw, watching the game from the NDCC press box, was handed a three-game sit and will miss Nelson’s next game of the season, Wednesday night at home against Spokane.Abenante was awarded the penalty shot when a Leaf defenceman closed his hand on the puck while it was in the air over the goal crease. Abenante calmly skated toward the Leaf goal before snapping a low wrist shot past Marcus Beelsey.Mark Stachan added an insurance goal for the Eddie Mountain leaders.Twice the Leafs rallied from one-goal deficits. Abenante gave the visitors a 1-0 lead at the first intermission break. Fernie dominated the frame, at one point out shooting the Leafs 12-0.Tanner Burns tied the game in the second, scoring on the power play before Mike Weist regained the lead for Fernie with a power play marker. The lead stood up until Colton Schell worked a pretty three-way passing play with teammates Gavin Currie and Cameron Dobransky with three minutes remaing in the frame.Fernie, undefeated in six games, dominated the Leafs for most of the game, holding a commanding 32-20 margin in shots and an 18-5 advantage in the first period.The loss snapped a brief two-game winning streak by Nelson, which started the season 0-4. The Leafs opened the weekend with an 8-3 trashing of Grand Forks Friday in the Boundary City thanks to a  four-point performance from Currie and two goals by Schell.The win gave Nelson some payback after the Bruins blasted the Green and White 6-2 earlier this season.After the teams traded goals, a power play marker by Currie put the Leafs ahead for good. Colton Malmsten gave Nelson a 3-1 lead before the period ended.Zachary Thompson beat Marcus Beesley in the Leaf nets to pull the Bruins to within a goal six minutes into the second frame. But Nelson outscored Grand Forks 3-1 in the late stages of the period to take a commanding 6-3 advantage after 40 minutes.Connor McLaughlin and Schell scored in the third to pad the Nelson lead.Dallon Stoddart, Marcus Dahl and Adrian Moyls also scored for the Leafs. Thompson led the Bruins with two goals while Nick Van Damme added the final marker.The Bruins out shot the Leafs 34-30. Rookie Walker Sidoni and Leaf captain Taylor O’Neil were involved in fights for Nelson.The Leafs return to action tonight at 7 p.m. at the NDCC Arena when Fernie Ghostriders pay a visit. The Ghostriders, 5-0 to start the season, dumped Creston Thunder Cats 3-1.BLUELINES: The official word by the KIJHL for suspending head coach Chris Shaw was due to the Leafs using  “non-approved – by Hockey Canada – players.” Twice Shaw used ineligible players and received a one-game suspension for the first offence (the Sept.18th contest against Grand Forks) and a two-game (during the Sept.19th game against Penticton) sit for the second. Assistant coaches Jason Rushton and Sean Dooley handled the coaching duties . . . Nelson was also without the services of defenceman Raymond Reimer. The 6’4”, 205-pound rearguard was suspended for one game for receiving a game misconduct in the final ten minutes of Sunday’s 3-2 Nelson win over Penticton Lakers. Reimer missed Saturday’s game due to family commitments. Forward Cody Abbey and defenceman Tyler Parfeniuk also missed the weekend games due to [email protected]last_img read more