UL Hospitals Group react to INMO strike action

first_imgUniversity Hospital LimerickIn anticipation of the proposed strike action by the Irish Nurses and Midwives Organisation (INMO), UL Hospitals Group confirms there will be significant disruption and cancellation of routine services across all of its hospitals on Wednesday, January 30.UL Hospitals continues to work with the INMO to secure the safest possible level of nursing and midwifery cover in our hospitals during the period of the strike and contingency arrangements are being finalised.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up All outpatient clinics have been cancelled.  The vast majority of elective procedures have been cancelled. However, a small number of elective surgeries will take place at UHL. These are complex cases where surgery is time-critical and these patients are being contacted directly by the hospital.Where cancellations are taking place, the relevant hospitals are making every effort to contact those patients affected.Updates will be provided through local and social media.Services not available at UL Hospitals Group on the day of the strike (Wednesday, 30th January):·         Injury units will not operate·         Planned inpatient surgery is cancelled. Inpatient is when you need to stay in hospital for one night or more.·         Planned day case procedures are cancelled. Day case is when you are given a hospital bed or a trolley but will not stay overnight.·         All outpatient appointments are cancelled. This includes adult, maternity and paediatric appointments. Outpatient is when you go to hospital for an appointment but don’t stay overnight.·         If a pregnant woman needs urgent assessment due to the cancellation of an appointment, she should go to the emergency admission room at University Maternity Hospital LimerickServices that are operating UL Hospitals Group on the day of the strike:·         Emergency Department at UHL (adult and children). Please only attend our emergency services if absolutely essential·         Maternity services (Delivery suites, home births, special care baby units, neonatal)·         Colposcopy services·         Oncology services (chemotherapy and radiotherapy)·         Dialysis·         Planned obstetric procedures (based on clinical need)·         Palliative careUL Hospitals Group expects that the ED will be busy and is reminding members of the public to consider all their care options before presenting to the Emergency Department at UHL.  Members of the public with a less serious illness can be treated by their GP or out of hours GP service where their GP can refer them to an Assessment Unit if required.However, if you are seriously injured or ill or are worried your life is at risk the ED will assess and treat you as a priority.UL Hospitals Group sites include: University Hospital Limerick, University Maternity Hospital Limerick, Ennis Hospital, Nenagh Hospital, St John’s Hospital and Croom Orthopaedic Hospital Updated Statement UL Hospitals Group Cyber Attack and Cancellations Housing 37 Compulsory Purchase Orders issued as council takes action on derelict sites RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Email Print WhatsApp Previous articleCiara will not contest local electionsNext articleCompetition: Bubbles & Barks Valentine’s Pamper Package at Petmania Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie TAGShealthLimerick City and CountyNewsUL Hospitals Group NewsHealthUL Hospitals Group react to INMO strike actionBy Staff Reporter – January 29, 2019 921 center_img Limerick on Covid watch list Twitter UL Hospitals Group & Public Health Mid-West: COVID-19 Precautions ‘Imperative’ As Hospital Services Prioritised for the Most Unwell Patients in Wake of Cyber Attack Advertisement UL Hospitals Group announces gradual relaxation of access restrictions at maternity hospital Facebook Limerick Post Show | Careers & Health Sciences Event for TY Students Linkedinlast_img read more

Oakland City University Alumni To Be Inducted Into The Indiana Basketball Hall of Fame

first_imgOakland City University Alumni To Be Inducted Into The Indiana Basketball Hall of FameOakland City University is proud to acknowledge two of our alumni who are being inducted on March 25, 2020, into the Indiana Basketball Hall of Fame.  Jerry Reynolds received his BS degree in Social Studies from then Oakland City College in 1966.  During his senior year, he coached the 1965-66 freshman team.  He has led a notable career in high school, college and professional basketball.  A two-time honorable mention all-state player at Springs Valley High School, he was a member of teams at Vincennes University that was 51-14 over two seasons.  His coaching career continued at Vincennes, where he was an assistant from 1966-1971, including their 1970 NJCAA National Championship season and where he recruited future NBA players Bob McAdoo, “Foots” Walker and Ricky Green.  As an assistant at West Georgia College, he was a member of their 1974 NAIA National Championship coaching staff.  In 10 years as the head coach at Rockhurst University and Pittsburg State University produced 192 wins and four District Coach of the Year honors.  The longest-tenured employee in Sacramento King’s history, his now 35-year career began as the franchise relocated from Kansas City in 1985 and has included the roles of head coach, assistant coach, scout, director of player personnel, general manager and television analyst.  His influence is also noted as the first general manager of the WNBA Sacramento Monarchs, earning his name in the rafters for his impact on that franchise.  He was also a member of the 2004 U.S. Women’s Olympic Team Selection Committee that won the gold medal.  He resides in Roseville, California.The late Ray Roesner graduated from then Oakland City College in 1957 with a BSE degree in Physical Education, History and Geography.  He was also named Mr. Basketball in 1956. His career reaped accolades as a high school and college player as well as notable coach and administrator roles.  A 1953 graduate of Holland High School, he set school records in single-game points (41), season scoring (617) and career points (830).  He averaged 23.7 points per game his senior season, leading Holland to their first sectional championship and was the state’s leading scorer in the 1953 regionals, totaling 62 points in two games.  His college career included 858 points in two seasons at Oakland City College (21.5 ppg), setting the school’s season scoring record (541).  His senior year 25.8 point per game average was 2nd best in Indiana, trailing only Hall of Famer Bailey Robertson.  He coached 18 seasons at Chrisney, Orleans, Princeton, Holland and Southridge high schools, totaling 201 wins and five sectional championships and was an assistant coach for the Southridge 1998 IHSAA 2A girls champion squad.  Also serving 15 years as the last Principal of Holland High School and first Principal of Southridge High School, he served two terms on the IHSAA Board of Control.  He died in 2018.Jerry Reynolds and Ray Roesner join five other Oakland City University alumni as members of the Indiana Basketball Hall of Fame: C. Eugene Cato, 1952; Joe Todrank, 1961, Herman Keller, 1927; Phil Eskew, Sr. 1929; and Charles McConnell, 1925. FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

Jenkins chosen for commission

first_imgUniversity president Fr. John Jenkins was recently appointed to a national commission that will examine the future of teaching and research in the humanities and social sciences. The Commission on the Humanities and Social Sciences, created by the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (AAAS), is co-chaired by Richard Brodhead, president of Duke University, and John Rowe, chair and chief executive officer of Exelon Corp. The commission includes prominent Americans from the humanities, social sciences, physical and life sciences, business, law, philanthropy, the arts and the media. The commission was spurred by a bipartisan request from U.S. Sens. Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) and Mark Warner (D-Va.) and Reps. Tom Petri (R-Wisc.) and David Price (D-N.C.). They presented the commission with the following charge: “What are the top 10 actions that Congress, state governments, universities, foundations, educators, individual benefactors and others should take now to maintain national excellence in humanities and social scientific scholarship and education, and to achieve long-term national goals for our intellectual and economic well-being; for a stronger, more vibrant civil society; and for the success of cultural diplomacy in the 21st century?” “The humanities and social sciences are often seen as having little application to the real world in which we live,” Jenkins said. “I couldn’t disagree more. The liberal arts give us important insight into our past, present and future — in politics, religion, the economy, education and other areas of our collective culture — and are integral to being an informed and contributing citizen of the world.” The commission expects to publish a report in 18 to 24 months, the press release said. Its members will focus on education, research and the institutions critical to advancing the humanities and social sciences in the nation. The commission will draw on past research efforts, the experience and expertise of its multidisciplinary members and data from its Humanities Indicators to analyze the nation’s excellence in the humanities and social sciences. Jenkins was elected to the AAAS in 2010. Other members of the commission are Amy Gutmann, John Hennessy, John Sexton, Donna Shalala and David Skorton, the presidents of the University of Pennsylvania and Stanford, New York, Miami and Cornell Universities, respectively; Robert Berdahl, president of the Association of American Universities; documentarian Ken Burns; musician Emmy Lou Harris; retired Supreme Court Justice David Souter; actor John Lithgow; director George Lucas; and Charles Vest, president of the National Academy of Engineering and former president of MIT.last_img read more

Soggy onions

first_imgGeorgia Vidalia Onion growers are ready for Mother Nature to turn off the tap. Record rainfall has dampened their crop, prevented them from getting into fields to take care of it and put it behind in development, says a University of Georgia onion expert.Record rainfall swamped Georgia over the past three months and continues to keep things soggy in southeast Georgia, where farmers typically plant each year an estimated 12,000 acres of Georgia’s official vegetable.“Right now, I’d say the condition of the crop is fair,” said Reid Torrance, UGA Cooperative Extension coordinator in Tattnall County and onion expert. “It’s the wettest I’ve ever seen. We’ve had record rainfall — three to four times normal — which has put everyone behind. We just can’t get in the fields. Basically, we’re trying to play catch up at this point.”Farmers start transplanting onions into fields in November. Conditions were drier then. Onions planted that month had a good head start on the weather, he said. Then the sky opened, dropping 12 inches of rain in December around Tattnall and Toombs counties, where the majority of the crop is planted. Over the past 8 weeks, the region has received close to 20 inches of rain.The crop is usually planted by the end of the year, he said. But this year, only 80 percent was in the ground by Jan. 1. The rest has trickled in during short dry spells.Farmers are a month behind in weed management and fertilizer applications. What they’ve been able to do in fields, he said, in many cases, has been washed away.In a few cases, Torrance has seen entire planting beds washed away, leaving the tiny bulbs once in them piled knee deep at the bottom of fields. In all, an estimated 15 percent of the planted crop is likely already lost.If there is a silver lining, he said, foliar diseases, up to this point, haven’t been a problem for the crop. Prolonged freezing temperatures in January zapped what foliage had sprouted. So, there is nothing for diseases to attack.The onions will be ready to hit the market in April, when harvest typically starts. “But whether it’ll be early or late April right now we don’t know,” he said.Georgia’s climatologist David Stooksbury recently said the wet, cool weather that has blanketed the state this winter will likely continue through spring.“We still have a lot of season left, and onions are resilient,” Torrance said. “But we’ve got to get a break here soon. Rain is the last thing we need.”last_img read more

ELL 9-10 All-Star team eliminated from state tourney after close losses

first_imgELLSWORTH — The Ellsworth Little League 9-10 All-Star softball team’s 2018 season came to an end over the weekend after a pair of tight losses against Medomak Valley and Kennebunk/Wells at the state tournament in Glenburn.Ellsworth came close to topping Medomak Valley on Saturday but fell 5-4. Anna Stevens and Lily King combined for 17 strikeouts and 1 hit allowed for Ellsworth, and Sophia Lynch led the way for the team offensively with a pair of singles.On Sunday, Ellsworth suffered a 4-1 defeat to Kennebunk/Wells for its second loss in the double-elimination tournament. Hermon and Windham were the other teams participating.In baseball, Machias Area Little League defeated Ellsworth 11-5 on Thursday to claim the District 1 title. Ellsworth bounced back from a 4-3 loss to Calais Little with a 5-1 win over Bucksport and a 13-10 win over Calais in the rematch before falling in the championship game.This is placeholder textThis is placeholder textlast_img read more

England struggle to 271-8 after familiar collapse

first_imgBy Ed OsmondLONDON, England (Reuters) – England’s batting frailties were exposed again as they wasted a solid start and laboured to 271 for eight on the first day of the final Ashes Test against Australia at The Oval yesterday.The Australians, who have retained the Ashes, dropped England captain Joe Root three times as he made 57 but the hosts failed to take full advantage and only Jos Buttler’s late unbeaten 64 saved them from complete collapse.“The boys batted really well in the morning and we got ourselves into a fantastic position but could not capitalise,” Buttler said. “Both sides are feeling a long series with a quick turnaround between Tests so that’s why the intensity goes up and down. Australia have a really good bowling attack and asked questions all day. It’s frustrating for us not being able to capitalise on our start.”Medium-pacer Mitchell Marsh took four wickets to boost Australia’s bid to secure a 3-1 series win after their captain Tim Paine won the toss and surprisingly sent England in to bat. Pat Cummins and Josh Hazlewood bowled tidy opening spells but the touring side’s vaunted pace attack lacked the consistent threat which has caused problems for England’s fragile top order throughout the series.Joe Denly, on 14, played a loose stroke at a wide delivery from Cummins and edged to second slip where Steve Smith fumbled the chance before grabbing the ball before it hit the ground.The opening partnership of 27 was the highest of the series but it was another failure for the 33-year-old Denly, who made battling fifties in the last two Tests without staking a claim to a long-term place in the team.CHARMED LIFERoot, badly dropped on 24 by Peter Siddle at fine leg, after playing a casual pull stroke, was also put down by wicketkeeper Paine off Cummins and England reached lunch at 86-1.Root was given another life when Smith spilled a sharp chance in the slips but Rory Burns hit seven fours in another determined knock. The young opening batsman was three runs away from his half-century when he got cramped up by a short ball from Hazlewood and spooned a simple catch to Marsh at mid-wicket.Ben Stokes, loudly cheered to the wicket after his match-winning century in the third Test, cautiously moved to 20 before he was tempted into a wild heave at medium-pacer Marsh and the ball looped off a leading edge to point.Root got to a patient fifty, off 105 balls, and his side moved on to 169-3 at tea, but any hopes England had of a substantial score disappeared in the final session. Root was bowled by a fine Cummins delivery which hit his off stump and Jonny Bairstow was trapped lbw for 22 by a Marsh yorker.Sam Curran hooked Cummins for an audacious six, but two deliveries later the young all-rounder was adjudged lbw, only to be recalled to the crease because Cummins had bowled a no-ball.His reprieve was short-lived, however, as Curran edged Marsh to Smith at second slip for 15 and the same bowler snared Chris Woakes lbw to claim his fourth wicket on his recall to the side.“I was like a kid at Christmas this morning,” Marsh said. “It can be a long tour when you are not playing. I just wanted to try and get an opportunity at some stage and it was nice to produce today. The ball came out reasonably well.” Jofra Archer then nicked Hazlewood to Paine before Buttler briefly lifted the crowd by hitting Hazlewood for two sixes in a row.Buttler pulled Hazlewood over the ropes again to reach his fifty and with Jack Leach providing obdurate support, the ninth-wicket pair shared an unbroken stand of 45 to boost England’s chances of levelling the series.ENGLAND 1st innings R. Burns c Marsh b Hazlewood 47J. Denly c Smith b Cummins 14J. Root (c) b Cummins 57B. Stokes c Lyon b Marsh 20J. Bairstow lbw b Marsh 22J. Buttler not out 64S. Curran c Smith b Marsh 15C. Woakes lbw b Marsh 2J. Archer c Paine b Hazlewood 9M. Leach not out 10Extras: (b-2, lb-7, nb-2) 11Total: (8 wickets, 82 overs) 271Fall of wickets: 1-27, 2-103, 3-130, 4-170, 5-176, 6-199, 7-205, 8-226.Bowling: P. Cummins 22.5-5-73-2, J. Hazlewood 21-7-76-2, P Siddle 17-1-61-0, M. Marsh 16.1-4-35-4, N. Lyon 4-0-12-0, M. Labuschagne 1-0-5-0.last_img read more