SM House / Miguel Gomes + Cassandra Carvas

first_imgSM House / Miguel Gomes + Cassandra CarvasSave this projectSaveSM House / Miguel Gomes + Cassandra Carvas Houses Area:  246 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project “COPY” Save this picture!© Mariana Lopes+ 19Curated by Pedro Vada Share 2018 ArchDaily Projects Photographs CopyAbout this officeMiguel GomesOfficeFollowCassandra CarvasOfficeFollowProductsWoodConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesOportoPortugalPublished on December 10, 2018Cite: “SM House / Miguel Gomes + Cassandra Carvas” [Casa SM / Miguel Gomes + Cassandra Carvas] 10 Dec 2018. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogShowerhansgroheShowers – RainfinityGlass3MGlass Finish – FASARA™ GeometricPartitionsSkyfoldVertically Folding Operable Walls – Zenith® Premium SeriesMetal PanelsTECU®Copper Surface – Patina_VariationsBeams / PillarsLunawoodThermowood Frames and BearersMembranesEffisusFaçade Fire Weatherproofing Solutions in Design District Project LondonSkylightsVELUX CommercialModular Skylight Ridgelight in Office BuildingSwitchesJUNGLight Switch – LS PlusCurtain WallsRabel Aluminium SystemsSpider System – Rabel 15000 Super ThermalWindowspanoramah!®ah! Soft CloseWoodAustralian Sustainable Hardwoods (ASH)American Oak by ASHChairs / StoolsOKHADining Chair – BarnettMore products »Save世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream Architects: Cassandra Carvas, Miguel Gomes Area Area of this architecture project ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/906403/sm-house-miguel-gomes-plus-cassandra-carvas Clipboard Photographs:  Mariana LopesEngineering:Jacinta Leite, Vítor Pinho, Ana AlvesClients:Miguel Freitas, Sara PiresCity:OportoCountry:PortugalMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Mariana LopesRecommended ProductsWoodGustafsWood Veneered Wall & Ceiling PanelsDoorsRabel Aluminium SystemsMinimal Sliding Door – Rabel 62 Slim Super ThermalWindowsKalwall®Facades – Window ReplacementsWoodEGGERLaminatesText description provided by the architects. The three-story house was originally built in the 1930s by the owner’s great-grandfather. The architectural intervention was a result of the house’s presented condition combined with its architectural quality. Save this picture!© Mariana LopesSave this picture!First Floor PlanSave this picture!© Mariana LopesSave this picture!SectionTherefore, the first two floors were restored due to its good state of preservation resulting in the keeping of the house’s identity; while the basement was renewed, currently assuming a contemporary aesthetics and solving a sequence of interconnected spaces in different levels.Save this picture!© Mariana LopesO mau estado de conservação do piso da cave, cuja fraca iluminação não permitia o conforto da sua utilização, foi completamente reformulado através de uma ampliação em betão aparente que respondeu às novas exigências programáticas pretendidas pelos clientes: a garagem; a lavandaria; e a sala de costura.Save this picture!© Mariana LopesA casa estabelece um diálogo entre o existente e o contemporâneo, representado através de um gesto formal: a história pousa no betão novo.Save this picture!© Mariana LopesProject gallerySee allShow lessThe Do-It-Yourself Vertical Village on the Fringes of LondonArticlesNove / Antonio Citterio Patricia VielSelected Projects Share “COPY” ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/906403/sm-house-miguel-gomes-plus-cassandra-carvas Clipboard CopyHouses•Oporto, Portugal SM House / Miguel Gomes + Cassandra Carvas Portugal Year: last_img read more

Hate draws a forceful response

first_imgOn Aug. 5, 2012, a white supremacist walked into a Sikh temple in Oak Creek, Wisc., and started shooting. The resulting casualties ― the gunman killed six people and wounded four before dying of a self-inflicted wound ― made the attack, at the time, the worst hate crime in America (the shooting in Charleston, S.C., last year would claim more victims). That the response by the small Wisconsin city was not one of vengeance or retribution, but of reconciliation and a search for greater understanding, has been described as testament not only to the resilience of Oak Creek but to the better nature of the nation as a whole.The story of that horror, and the healing that came after, is the focus of a short documentary, “Waking in Oak Creek,” which screened at the Brattle Theatre on Tuesday. The final installment of the Religion Refocused series, sponsored by the Pluralism Project at Harvard and made possible by support from Mass Humanities, the screening was aimed at bringing the conversation around the incident to Cambridge, as was a panel discussion afterward. Moderated by Diana Eck, director of the Pluralism Project and a professor of religion in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, the panel included the filmmaker, Patrice O’Neill, as well as community activists.“Waking in Oak Creek” opens with the 911 calls and incorporates police and news reports from the incident, the terror and chaos of which is made clear and personal in interviews with survivors. Family photos and film footage of the murder victims add to the poignancy, while interviews with Lt. Brian Murphy of the Oak Creek police, who was shot 15 times in the attack, illustrate the long road back for the wounded.But the emphasis in the film is on community action. Candlelight vigils united the city, including groups as diverse as the local American Legion, Christian churches, and Jewish synagogues, while testimony by Sikh temple members brought about legislation that clarified the status of Sikhs in federal hate crimes.O’Neill said that the 34-minute documentary, released in 2014, has been screened more than 3,000 times by community and police groups.,“This film is not about violence,” said O’Neill, a leader of the anti-bullying and anti-hate group Not in Our Town. “This film is about all the people … who can find a way to change and shift the culture that is becoming so toxic.”Explaining the film’s title, O’Neill quoted Pardeep Kaleka, who was also part of the panel. A former Milwaukee police officer, Kaleka, now a teacher, is the eldest son of Satwant Singh Kaleka, the murdered president of the Sikh temple.“We need to be awake,” O’Neill said, echoing Kaleka’s words in the film and citing the Sikh tenet of mindfulness and “relentless optimism” as the appropriate answer to hate.Panelist Arno Michaelis echoed that message. A former white supremacist, Michaelis co-founded the outreach organization Serve 2 Unite with Kaleka.“Belief that the world is basically good is the antidote to violence,” he said. Answering questions about his conversion, Michaelis recalled how various simple acts of friendship — a sandwich shared by an African-American co-worker, a job offer from a Jewish businessman ― ultimately guided him away from hate.Karin Firoza, the assistant director of the Center for Spirituality, Dialogue, and Service at Northeastern University, took the discussion into the Boston area, talking about her work with local youth.“There’s a lot of fear about being not only harmed but also discriminated against,” said Firoza, who is active with Boston’s Young Muslims Engaging, a high school group, and co-founded Roots & Wings Training and Consultation.For Kaleka, the trauma that he, his family, and his community suffered prompted a personal awakening, redirecting his life toward teaching and outreach. This was the message he came to share. “Every moment of fear, every moment of ignorance, is an opportunity,” he said. “Take every moment as an opportunity.”The 25th anniversary of the Pluralism Project will be celebrated during the opening of a special exhibit on Wednesday at 3 p.m. at Harvard Divinity School’s Andover-Harvard Theological Library. The celebration is open to the public and Professor Diana Eck will be on hand to provide remarks.last_img read more

Climate change affects Saharan dust storms

first_img Read Full Story A new groundbreaking study shows that warming planet will make dust storms more intense in the Mediterranean and the Atlantic.Using the highest-resolution continuous climate record ever published, the study explains the connections between dust storms, extended periods of drought, volcanoes, and warming in the Mediterranean, Europe and Asia.These ultra-high-resolution records revealed stronger Saharan dust storms during past warming periods, and provide a glimpse of what we may expect in the future. More intense storms will impact glaciers by making them darker so they absorb more heat. More dust in the air will worsen air quality and public health, while also affecting the frequency of North Atlantic hurricanes.The study is another milestone in the collaboration between the Initiative for the Science of the Human Past at Harvard and the Climate Change Institute at the University of Maine. This interdisciplinary team of climate scientists, historians and archaeologists combined data from an ice core retrieved from the European Alps with highly detailed historical records. In the past, dust storms occurring at the same time as rainstorms were often recorded as “blood rain” due to the reddish color of Saharan dust.,The melting of glaciers caused by manmade climate change will contribute to erasing a vital source of information to study climate change itself, since ice from these millennia-old natural archives routinely reveal how climate patterns have changed over time and how climate will change in the future.To address this crisis, the Climate Change Institute’s W.M. Keck Laser Ice Facility created a non-destructive system that allows preservation of the ice indefinitely, while providing climate data of the unprecedented ultra-high resolution which alone is compatible with detailed historical data. The new technology offers a truly transformative solution to both the study and the effects of climate change at the cutting edge of research. The article is published in JGR Atmospheres, a journal of the American Geophysical Union, the premiere professional association dedicated to the study of climate and environmental change.The research presented in this study is supported by funding from Arcadia, a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin. All datasets on which the study is based are provided in open access to the public. In addition, support for method development and analysis was provided by the W.M. Keck Foundation and the National Science Foundation.last_img read more

UWV pension fund ramps up risk with private equity, infrastructure

first_imgThe €6.3bn pension fund of insurance provider UWV has raised its risk profile by increasing exposure to private equity and infrastructure.According to its 2015 annual report, it also plans to increase real estate investments and holdings in commercial and residential mortgages at the expense of its euro-denominated government bond and equity allocations.The scheme said it had decided, based partly on a survey into the risk appetite of its participants, to allocate 10% of its portfolio to risk-bearing investments, adding that it had already reduced its strategic interest hedge from 60% to 50%.It estimates its policy change will increase its surplus return by 0.7 percentage points to 2.2%. The UWV scheme aims to raise the combined private equity and infrastructure allocation to 5%, with the help of asset manager Partners Group.Its property and mortgages portfolios are to account for 10% and 6% of overall assets, respectively.The scheme has placed the four asset classes in a separate portfolio that holds illiquid investments – next to its regular matching and return portfolios – specifically meant for generating returns for indexation.The Pensioenfonds UWV said it also wanted to focus on cost-saving via passive investment, pointing out that its developed-market equity, government bond, inflation-linked bond and commodities holdings were already under passive management.It said it would update its contracts with pensions provider TKP Pensioen and fiduciary asset manager Allianz Global Investors this year.Last year, it replaced Morgan Stanley as its active manager for local-currency emerging market debt (EMD) with Legal & General, which now manages the investments passively.It said it would review Aberdeen AM as active manager of its hard-currency EMD holdings after the manager underperformed last year by 4.1 percentage points. The UWV scheme posted a net return of -0.6% due largely to a 3.3% loss on its matching portfolio, as well as negative results on its interest and currency hedges.It said its strategy shift also reduced its return by 0.5 percentage points.The pension paid €152 per participant for pensions administration and spent 0.38% and 0.17% on asset management and transactions, respectively.Its funding stood at 95.7% as at the end of June.last_img read more