Mc Hugh says IDA has had success in Donegal, but more can be done

first_img Facebook It’s been claimed this afternoon that investment by IDA client companies directly created 758 high-skilled jobs in Donegal from 2011 to 2014, and resulted in an estimated 531 additional indirect positions in the local economy.Junior Minister Joe McHugh says IDA investment is creating opportunities for Donegal’s skilled workforce, but there are challenges, particularly in terms of creating jobs for unskilled workers.As the cabinet discusses jobs at its meeting, today, Minister Mc Hugh says he’ll be pushing Jobs Minister Richard Bruton to maximise support for the North West, particularly in terms of infrastructure and communications…………Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/mchugjobs.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. By News Highland – January 14, 2015 Help sought in search for missing 27 year old in Letterkenny Twitter Google+ Nine Til Noon Show – Listen back to Wednesday’s Programme NPHET ‘positive’ on easing restrictions – Donnelly Three factors driving Donegal housing market – Robinson Facebook Pinterest Twittercenter_img Homepage BannerNews WhatsApp WhatsApp Google+ Previous articlePostponed Dr Mc Kenna games refixed for Sunday 18th JanuaryNext articleTrolley numbers fall at LGH as nurses protest outside Leinster House News Highland News, Sport and Obituaries on Wednesday May 26th Pinterest 448 new cases of Covid 19 reported today Mc Hugh says IDA has had success in Donegal, but more can be done RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORlast_img read more

Image of the Day: TR Fires Rolling Airframe Missile

first_img View post tag: T/R Back to overview,Home naval-today Image of the Day: TR Fires Rolling Airframe Missile View post tag: Rolling View post tag: Image of the Day View post tag: Naval August 21, 2014 View post tag: americas View post tag: News by topic The aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) launches a Rolling Airframe Missile (RAM). View post tag: Missile View post tag: Fires Image of the Day: TR Fires Rolling Airframe Missile View post tag: Navy The RAM was tested to ensure its combat readiness, and ability to defend against anti-ship cruise missiles and other asymmetric threats.Theodore Roosevelt is underway conducting training and preparing for future deployments.[mappress]Naval Today Staff, August 21, 2014; Image: U.S. Navy Authorities View post tag: Airframe Share this articlelast_img read more

Climate change affects Saharan dust storms

first_img Read Full Story A new groundbreaking study shows that warming planet will make dust storms more intense in the Mediterranean and the Atlantic.Using the highest-resolution continuous climate record ever published, the study explains the connections between dust storms, extended periods of drought, volcanoes, and warming in the Mediterranean, Europe and Asia.These ultra-high-resolution records revealed stronger Saharan dust storms during past warming periods, and provide a glimpse of what we may expect in the future. More intense storms will impact glaciers by making them darker so they absorb more heat. More dust in the air will worsen air quality and public health, while also affecting the frequency of North Atlantic hurricanes.The study is another milestone in the collaboration between the Initiative for the Science of the Human Past at Harvard and the Climate Change Institute at the University of Maine. This interdisciplinary team of climate scientists, historians and archaeologists combined data from an ice core retrieved from the European Alps with highly detailed historical records. In the past, dust storms occurring at the same time as rainstorms were often recorded as “blood rain” due to the reddish color of Saharan dust.,The melting of glaciers caused by manmade climate change will contribute to erasing a vital source of information to study climate change itself, since ice from these millennia-old natural archives routinely reveal how climate patterns have changed over time and how climate will change in the future.To address this crisis, the Climate Change Institute’s W.M. Keck Laser Ice Facility created a non-destructive system that allows preservation of the ice indefinitely, while providing climate data of the unprecedented ultra-high resolution which alone is compatible with detailed historical data. The new technology offers a truly transformative solution to both the study and the effects of climate change at the cutting edge of research. The article is published in JGR Atmospheres, a journal of the American Geophysical Union, the premiere professional association dedicated to the study of climate and environmental change.The research presented in this study is supported by funding from Arcadia, a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin. All datasets on which the study is based are provided in open access to the public. In addition, support for method development and analysis was provided by the W.M. Keck Foundation and the National Science Foundation.last_img read more

“Many Hands Make Light Work”

first_img Interesting note about Rio Negro Air Base I saw the spirit of Colombia in that awakening. It was a festival morning, with radiant sun and spring breezes; a Saturday in Medellín, Antioquia. Outside, floats and horses were being decorated; inside, in the intensive-care unit in Pablo Tobón Uribe Hospital, a career National Army Soldier was lying on a bed. His face was lifeless, the left side destroyed, the eye covered by a bandage, his ear, his cheekbone, and his jaw repaired by several sutures. Beneath the sheets, the glimpse of fragile, almost terminal breathing. The night before, while I piloted a UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter that belonged to the 5th Combat Air Command (Rionegro, Antioquia), my crew received an alert for an airborne medical evacuation fora soldier wounded in a minefield during combat against the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) narco-terrorist organization. In the jungle and amid crossfire, he was aided by one of his comrades, who tore his uniform to make a tourniquet to hold the profuse bleeding. His wounds were atrocious and expelled a nauseating smell, contaminated with human waste contained in the explosive charge. His left foot hung by the tendons, and the edges of the bones had come through the skin. It was nine in the morning when I arrived at the Tobón hospital reception desk, where a nurse informed me that the surgery was over and that the Soldier was recovering in intensive care. I took the elevator and recalled the first hours of that day, when the evacuation of that young man began. At three in the morning, I was piloting the Black Hawk on a steep descent amid the peaks of the Ayapel mountain range. I was flying with night-vision goggles, together with an AH-60 Harpy helicopter that was firing its machine guns to repel the curtain of anti-aircraft fire that the enemy had prepared for us. When I reached the treetops, we began the final approach. The rotor wake stirred up dirt and twigs that formed a whirlwind of lights and shadows from which four soldiers emerged with the stretcher. Our combat nurse and the flight technicians received the patient and positioned him in the cargo bay. As soon as we left that clearing and shut the doors, the smell of his wounds inundated the aircraft. I turned my head to evaluate the situation, and found myself with the figure of a warrior worn down by barbarism, a person with an emaciated face; his clothes were soaked with sweat, blood, and mud. The elevator reached the intensive-care floor, the doors opened, and I was surprised to see a corpse-like figure covered with pink sheets crossing the hallway. I made the sign of the cross without wanting to look too closely, but it was inevitable. The sheets revealed the outline of a cold, somber figure that seemed forgotten, like just another object on that floor. What if it was the soldier? That vision hit me like a stab in the heart. I couldn’t believe that our efforts would have ended like that; I couldn’t accept that idea as true. The fear made me act strangely, and I reached out to uncover the corpse’s face. “Are you a relative?” asked a nurse, who roused me abruptly from my thoughts. “No, no … I’m looking for a soldier we brought in this morning; he was wounded by an anti-personnel mine.” “He’ll wake up soon,” she responded as she appointed to a room at the end of the ward. She then had covered the corpse’s face with indifference and headed off with it; disappearing at the end of the hallway. A doctor heard that conversation. “Are you a relative of the soldier?” he asked. “No, I’m the pilot of the crew that evacuated him early this morning. I came to see him because I wanted to meet him.” “Thank you for what all of you are doing,” said the doctor. “We get soldiers like that almost every day. This man came in half-dead; you brought him in time. Look, he’ll wake up soon. He’s in very serious condition; he’s lost a lot of blood, and we’re trying to control a severe infection caused by the contamination of his wounds. His prognosis is uncertain. We amputated his left foot, and we still don’t know whether he’ll lose the eye. He hasn’t woken up; if he does, don’t give him the news let me talk to him first.” While we were flying, the combat nurse opened the medical kit and shook a flask, injected the contents into the patient’s arm, removed the dirty bandages and examined the wounds, took the patient’s pulse, and asked how long it would take to get to Medellín. I told him 50 minutes. In the distance, behind the mountains, the lights of the city were visible; it was 3:40 a.m. The helicopter’s motors were going at full throttle, almost at the point of blowing out. The city was preparing to celebrate the 2005 Flower Festival. What a paradox, I thought, some celebrating and others fighting steadfastly, whether wounded or unwillingly dealing out wounds in order to survive! The nurse was focused on changing bandages, injecting medicine, and cleaning wounds. I noticed that he murmured a prayer. As I entered the room, I found the soldier unconscious and hooked up to several monitors that were controlling his vital signs. The atmosphere in the room was so thick that I felt that it was weighing on my shoulders. A glacial silence reigned, as in a tomb. His face appeared to be that of a humble fisherman. His wounds were now clean, and his stump, wrapped in bandages, stood out amid the sheets. One of his fingers moved abruptly, and a monitor began to beep. At that instant, he opened his left hand, and suddenly, with a trembling and clumsy movement, he raised his right arm to pull out the tubes that were keeping him alive. The doctor rushed forward and instructed me to help him. A nurse ran in. His energy gradually weakened, until he became calm. His gaze moved around the room. A doctor, a nurse, a strange man, monitors, needles, and bandages surrounded him, and he quickly understood the situation. His right eye met the doctor’s gaze, and the latter, with a sorrowful air, grasped his shoulder in order to speak to him. “Soldier, thank you! Thank you for what you’ve done for Colombia. Yesterday, you stumbled into a minefield and suffered serious wounds. One of your feet was badly hurt, and we couldn’t save it.” The soldier closed his eyes and pressed his lips together. A tear slid down his cheek. There was a silence that transfixed the walls and invaded the entire floor. “Do you want me to call anyone and tell them that you’re here?” I asked. “My commander. Tell him that my morale is high and I still have fight in me. That they should expect me there, that… I’ll walk again. Right, doctor?” The doctor agreed. “And my comrades? How are they?” “They’re well,” I responded. There was a distant happiness in his eyes. “Long live my National Army! We’re going to win, right? That’s my Army,” he said, and fell into uncontrollable weeping. I felt as if something had broken within my soul. “And your mom, do you want me to call her?” I insisted. “No, not her… I’ll talk to her later. I don’t want to worry her.” “Do you need me to bring you anything? Food, clothes…?” “Yes, get me a Bible, please; I need to talk to God.” We remained silent a long while. I had seen the spirit of Colombia in that ravaged face, in that weakened body of great spiritual strength. The courage of this soldier was not false; it was virtuous. A man removed from hypocrisy. The Colombian Air Force had saved the spirit of a valiant man, a symbol of the heroism of all Colombian soldiers. That day, I felt very proud to wear the wings of a Military pilot. I had seen how the commitment of our Air Force made us leaders in adversity and an example for all our fellow countrymen. On the way to Rionegro, to the air base where I lived, I felt as if I had not spoken a single word in my entire life. I felt that I was unable to speak about what was most important, about the object of my deepest thoughts. I perked up my ears, I suppressed the beating of my heart, so as not to miss a single detail of that encounter; my memory needed to preserve this experience, because I would need to remember it each time my spirits or those of a comrade flagged. *A phrase from Homer, the name given to the Greek poet who was the author of the Iliad and the Odyssey. By Dialogo April 19, 2012last_img read more

Candriam seeks to grow institutional business in Switzerland, Germany

first_imgNaïm Abou-Jaoude, chief executive at Candriam, told IPE the brand change was necessary, would reinvigorate the business and give it a positive momentum among clients and staff.He said now the transformation was complete, the business would focus on its third-party distribution and its institutional business – which accounts for around two-thirds of the manager’s assets.“With our new brand offering a fresh start, coupled with the stability of the management,” Abou-Jaoude said, “we can fully enhance the business, and in particular our relationships with the consultants, who are likely to be more open to having new discussions with us on what we can offer to their clients.”Candriam, within the next nine months, wants to grow institutional business in Switzerland and Germany while increasing third-party distribution exposure in the UK.Abou-Jaoude said institutional business in the UK was an ambition but would be more realistic in 18 months’ time.With regard to offerings, the chief executive said Candriam was looking to build on its previous products and provide more suitable solutions to institutional clients.“We want to go in two directions,” he said. “One is offering a flexible multi-asset fund, and a multi-asset income fund, which will capture the spreads from different asset class.“The second is short high-yield offering, using a combination of long-short strategies.”The firm is also working on equity products for its insurance clients that will utilise the benefits of derivatives, mitigating the downside of equity investing, and reducing the capital requirements under Solvency II.In terms of the asset manager’s new partnership with NYLIM, the firm said its expansion would not include the US, given its complementary offering to its parent’s other boutiques.“We cover some other products NYLIM does not have, so the idea is to complement the offering and see how we can develop synergies on both sides,” Abou-Jaoude said.Yie-Hsin Hung, co-president of NYLIM and chair of Candriam, told IPE the boutique owner would also continue its expansion after its foray in the European market with the Dexia acquisition.“We continue to want to grow our business,” she said.“Our aspiration would be to grow in areas we don’t have a presence today, but our immediate focus is that Candriam is successful and can leverage all the resources available from NYLIM.” Candriam, the new trading name for Dexia Asset Management, will look to expand its offering in three new territories following its rebrand and completed takeover by New York Life Investment Management (NYLIM).The manager, which was plagued by uncertainty for more than two years as it was subject to takeover talks, saw business deteriorate as clients awaited confirmation of the firm’s future.However, in December 2013, US-based NYLIM, the asset management arm of insurer New York Life, completed its rumoured takeover of the European manager, adding it to its multi-boutique operation.The following February, it was announced the firm would shed its Dexia brand, moving forward from the turmoil under the name Candriam.last_img read more