“Victory for protection of sources” as court overturns contempt ruling against Ken Peters

first_img to go further November 11, 2020 Find out more CanadaAmericas “We must impose democratic obligations on the leading digital players” The Toronto appeal court yesterday overturned a 2004 “contempt of court” ruling against Ken Peters, of the daily Hamilton Spectator, for refusing to name a source. The organisation hopes that the decision will set a precedent for cases at federal level. Help by sharing this information Forum on Information and Democracy 250 recommendations on how to stop “infodemics” March 19, 2008 – Updated on January 20, 2016 “Victory for protection of sources” as court overturns contempt ruling against Ken Peters Organisation November 19, 2020 Find out more News Receive email alertscenter_img Follow the news on Canada On eve of the G20 Riyadh summit, RSF calls for public support to secure the release of jailed journalists in Saudi Arabia News January 15, 2021 Find out more The Ontario appeal court ruling on the Peters case, comes shortly after a decision with the opposite effect handed down by the same court in February, forcing another Toronto daily, the National Post, to hand documents over to the court received from an anonymous source. A new measure in the federal criminal code, which came into force on 15 September 2004, obliges the press to hand over notes, documents, and sound or video recordings which could help resolve a criminal investigation. Protection of sources suffered another setback, this time at the federal level in Montreal on 18 January, when Joël-Denis Bellavance and Gilles Toupin, of the French-language daily La Presse, were ordered to reveal the name of an informant at the request of a person accused of “terrorism” (see release of 21 January 2008). CanadaAmericas RSF_en News Reporters Without Borders today hailed a court ruling overturning a 2004 “contempt of court” verdict against journalist Ken Peters, of the daily Hamilton Spectator, for refusing to reveal his source for articles he wrote on alleged abuses at a retirement home.The Ontario appeal court yesterday quashed the contempt conviction against the journalist who had escaped prison but had been ordered to pay 31,600 dollars in legal costs. This financial penalty was also overturned.“We hail the Ontario appeal court decision, which marks a victory for the protection of sources, the cornerstone of the journalist’s profession”, the worldwide press freedom organisation said.Peters, a municipal affairs reporter in the Hamilton suburb of Toronto, was passed documents in 1995 which alleged serious problems at the St Elizabeth Home Society. After he wrote a series of articles, the retirement home sued for defamation against the Hamilton-Wensworth region, the Hamilton municipality and its former mayor. After a long-running legal battle, Judge David Crane, of the Hamilton court, ordered Peters to reveal the name of the person who had given him the documents. Peters refused to comply with the judge’s order, but the man in question – former city alderman, Henry Merling – identified himself as the source. The journalist therefore avoided criminal prosecution and a possible jail sentence.But a civil court, on 1st December 2004, convicted Peters of “contempt of court” and ordered him to pay court costs of 31,600 dollars. “Ken Peters’ conviction in the lower court was not only dangerous in principle, but also absurd since the source had already revealed himself”, Reporters Without Borders said. “We hope that this judicial outcome will create jurisprudence and be taken up at the federal level. Other Canadian journalists are currently facing proceedings for the same reason as Ken Peters”, the organisation added. Newslast_img read more

FB : Keeping their stripes: Gross and Syracuse hope Pinstripe Bowl will sign on with ACC

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Comments Daryl Gross has actively marketed Syracuse as ‘New York’s College Team’ since he began his tenure as athletic director seven years ago.Syracuse’s victory over Kansas State in the inaugural New Era Pinstripe Bowl at Yankee Stadium last December was a milestone for Gross in achieving his ultimate goal of dominating New York’s collegiate landscape.With Syracuse set to join the Atlantic Coast Conference in 2014, though, the program may not get a chance to play on that stage in the future. The Pinstripe Bowl is currently in the second year of a four-year contract with the Big East and Big 12. So when SU makes the move to the ACC in 2014, the Pinstripe Bowl’s contract will be open.And Gross would like nothing more than for the ACC to explore a contract with the Pinstripe Bowl when its current deal expires to maintain Syracuse’s influence in New York and potentially compete against former Big East rivals.‘Absolutely, absolutely. I would love that,’ Gross said. ‘I think that the Pinstripe Bowl folks would probably love to check out those types of relationships. There’s just good matchups. And heck, why can’t it be a Big East-ACC? Why can’t it be some of those types of things?’AdvertisementThis is placeholder textOnce its current deal with the Big East and Big 12 expires, the bowl could be open to new options. That is when Gross hopes the ACC slides into the Big 12’s potentially vacated spot.Without the opportunity to play in the Big East Tournament at Madison Square Garden every year once ACC play begins, Syracuse, which Gross called the ‘big boy’ in the state with potent football and basketball programs, will want to grasp onto any possible opportunities to compete in New York City.Though the Pinstripe Bowl isn’t a top-tier bowl game, it has value for Syracuse in the form of increased media exposure, as it is broadcasted on national television.But the ACC has not yet discussed its next bowl cycle, a conference official said. The conference is amid its October meetings, discussing topics such as when Syracuse and Pittsburgh will begin play in the ACC, what type of structure the conference will use — one division or two — and how its conference championships will be organized.When the time comes to potentially pursue a spot in the Pinstripe Bowl, the ACC will have to factor in the incentives of rekindling what soon may become dormant Big East rivalries. The ACC will explore bowls that receive a majority vote from the 14 athletic directors, the ACC official said.But that’s still three years away and the Pinstripe Bowl itself ultimately decides which conferences get bids.A Pinstripe Bowl official declined to comment on the ACC’s potential interest and said the organization is focused solely on its current contract.The Big East, however, is not necessarily buying into Gross’ vision of an ACC-Big East matchup in the Pinstripe Bowl.‘Our teams already play ACC opponents in the Champs Sports Bowl and the Belk Bowl, so I’m not sure it would be prudent to add to that,’ a Big East spokesman said in an email to The Daily Orange.With three years left on its existing bowl contracts, the spokesman said it’s ‘too early’ for the Big East to speculate about future bowl partners. But when the conference does look into future bowl games, the spokesman said the Big East will value ‘desirable destinations and top-level competition for our schools.’Until then, Syracuse, which has already secured half of the six wins necessary to qualify for a bowl, has two more potential opportunities to play in the Pinstripe Bowl.Playing in last year’s inaugural bowl game at Yankee Stadium held sentimental value for many of the players on the team.For former Syracuse safety George Mayes, it was an opportunity to play in front of family — something he and the other 34 Syracuse players from New York and New Jersey weren’t often able to do at home games in the Carrier Dome last season.In Mayes’ mind, the day that stands out isn’t Dec. 30, when the game was played. Rather, Mayes remembers four days earlier. If he could, Mayes would relive Dec. 26, 2010, every day.On that Sunday, he and his family drove from their home in Roselle, N.J., to the Grand Hyatt New York, where the SU football team stayed during the days leading up to the Pinstripe Bowl.Though it was only a half-hour drive, Mayes vividly remembers thinking back on memories at Syracuse with family and anticipating the culmination of his collegiate career in what would be his first and last bowl game. And there was no more fitting place to do so than close to home at Yankee Stadium.By the time he took the field Thursday, Mayes was ecstatic.‘It was unreal to be honest man,’ Mayes said. ‘ … It was probably one of the best days I’ve ever experienced in my life.’Now, Mayes sympathizes for the current and future SU players who may never have the chance to partake in the homecoming of sorts he did.Though he expects his alma mater to advance to Bowl Championship Series bowls in coming seasons, Mayes was looking forward to SU playing in the Pinstripe Bowl becoming a ‘big tradition’ for years to come.The one Pinstripe Bowl the Orange did play in was about more than just the football program. It was about elevating SU’s campaign as ‘New York’s College Team.’‘The fact that we’re New York’s College Team, I think it was big for the state,’ Mayes said. ‘I think it was big for the university for us to just represent and for the folks to remain loyal.’[email protected]—Sports Editor Michael Cohen and Asst. News Editor Jon Harris contributed reporting to this article.   center_img Published on October 5, 2011 at 12:00 pm Contact Stephen: [email protected] | @Stephen_Bailey1last_img read more

Boxers Eye N4m in Prize Monies

first_imgThree of the 14 boxers scheduled to fight at GOtv Boxing Night 13 will go home with a total sum of N4million in addition to their fighter’s purse. The cash is attached to the Mojisola Ogunsanya Memorial Prize for the best boxers at the event.The best boxer will go home with N2.5million, while the two runners-up will win N1million and N500, 000.Among the boxers that will on parade are past winners of the best boxer award. They include Olaide Fijabi, Oto Joseph, who had more than once won N1million, the sum previously attached to the prize, and Rilwan Babatunde, who won N2million at GOtv Boxing Night 11.A total of seven bouts are scheduled for the event, with the biggest being the African Boxing Union (ABU) lightweight title decider between Nigeria’s Oto Joseph and Abdukrahim Mohammed of Egypt. Next to it is the ABU light welterweight clash between Fijabi and Shadrack” Kobero of Tanzania.In the other title fights, Nigeria’s Abolaji Rasheed will defend his title against Arye Ayitteh of Ghana, while Baby Face and Chijioke Ngige will duel for the national lightweight title.Three challenge bouts are on the card. In the lightweight category, Rilwan Oladosu will confront Kehinde Badmus, while Jimoh “Hogan Jimoh Jr.” Lukman will fight Rilwan Opatola. The middleweight division will see Matthew Obinna up against David Awosika.Ticket-holding fans will be taken in buses, free of charge, to the event venue from the National Stadium and brought back at the end of the show.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more