Academic Adviser – UMSON P-TECH Subaward grant

first_imgDescription/Job SummaryOverview: Under the general direction of the Dean, thisposition will be responsible for providing academic advising ofundergraduate students in the Pre-Health Professions Pathwaysinterested in completing the RN to BSN articulation and dual–enrollment programs.Responsibilities/DutiesEssential Functions: Provides academic advising of undergraduate students in thePTECH nursing pathway for completion in the BCCC nursingprogramProvides academic advising regarding all relevant curriculumareas- course requirements and selection, policies and procedures,scholastic standards, new freshman and transfer issues, asappropriate for students enrolled in the PTECH nursing pathwayFacilitates PTECH nursing students’ academic progress byassessing their needs and developing appropriate educationalplansMaintains student academic files to demonstrate academicprogression metrics. The tracking activities include documentationof each PTECH student advising meeting sessions; electronicmonitoring; enrollment, progression and graduation metrics andutilization of Gap analysis.Assists in the development and preparation ofadvising/educational materials in collaboration with the BCCCNursing faculty and Marketing Department. The educational materialsmay include training manuals, brochures, handouts, generalinformation summaries, and newslettersCollaborates with BCCC Nursing faculty, the Admissions andStudent Affairs Division and Marketing Department to conductinformation sessions and distribute educational/multimediamarketing materials regarding the PTECH nursing pathway toppotential, current students, and other interested partiesMaintains, collects and disseminates information to students,faculty and departments regarding advising strategies for academicstrategies and academic support services.Participates in professional development activities,professional conferences, BCCC departmental meetings and advisorymeetingsCollaborate with BCCC Associate Dean, BCCC Nursing to developfaculty mentoring program; identify BCCC nursing faculty mentors toparticipate in this program.Collaborate with UNSON and BCCC to design and implement amarketing campaign to attract middle school students to PTECHprograms at BCCCPerform other additional duties as assigned Work Environment:This position typically works indoors in a standard classroom/labenvironment, generally free from hazardous or unpleasant physicalconditions. Work involves observance of safety precautions typicalof modern classroom/lab settings. The work environment is highlydiverse and demands a high level of cultural competence ininterpersonal communications and interactions.Physical Demands:The work entails sitting and standing for extended periods,frequent walking, bending, stooping, and reaching. Work requireseye-hand coordination, manual dexterity, near vision acuity, andthe ability to see and read printed material and computer screens.Duties involve oral, written, electronic and telephoniccommunication; typing; and lifting and transporting supplies,materials and equipment.Required QualificationsMinimum Qualifications: Experience in an institution of Higher EducationExperience with Canvas or other LMSExperience in outcomes assessmentExperience designing marketing and education materialsExperience in public speaking in an institution to studentsdirectly and in groupsExperience in advising students pursuing health professionscareers Knowledge of group dynamics and student behaviorKnowledge of a variety of teaching techniquesAbility to teach and advise in a classroom lab settingAbility to assess educational needs and develop advisementplansAbility to interpret test dataAbility to set educational goals and to define specificobjectives Bachelor’s Degree in counseling or related fieldMinimum of 1 year experience in academic advising orcounselingPreferred QualificationsPreferred Qualifications: Required Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities:last_img read more

Saint Mary’s students react to Midnight Express cancellation

first_imgWhen Saint Mary’s senior Marta Antonetti learned the Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s student governments jointly moved to cancel the South Bend Transpo Midnight Express route, she created and distributed a Google Forms petition for students to sign if they were “angered by the decision.”Since then, about 40 students have signed the petition asking the Saint Mary’s administration to either reinstate the program or provide a new Saturday service as soon as possible, Antonetti said.“Recently the collective Student Administration of ND/SMC (of course [Holy Cross] was excluded from the conversation, we wouldn’t actually want to create [an] environment where we interact with one another) decided to cease the Midnight Express/Saturday service,” Antonetti said in the Google Form. “This decision harms ROTC students, band students, lower-income students, students with disabilities, student athletes, members of ND clubs, student workers and the ND/SMC/HCC community. As far as we know, this decision was made without consulting the student body … BAVO or GreenDot or anyone who might have a legitimate reason to keep the bus going.”Since starting the petition, Antonetti met with vice president for student affairs Karen Johnson to discuss the decision-making process that resulted in the cancellation and discuss potential solutions for the future. She said she feels frustrated that the administrations have yet to effectively replace the Midnight Express.“It’s been two months and there’s been no real solution,” Antonetti said. “A solution has to be put forward, an actual one that makes sense.”This summer, the student governments of Saint Mary’s and Notre Dame decided to cancel the South Bend Transpo Midnight Express route after Transpo announced a 50% price hike in operating costs. Due to this cancellation and other scheduling changes, the final South Bend Transpo bus leaving the Grotto towards Saint Mary’s Regina Hall stop will leave at 9:13 p.m. Fridays, and no Saturday services will be provided at all.In a campus-wide email Aug. 27, Johnson said Blinkie, the Saint Mary’s escort van service, will serve as alternative transportation.“[Blinkie] WILL continue to run from dark to 2 a.m. Sunday-Thursday and from dark to 4 a.m. on Friday and Saturday,” Johnson said in the email. “Blinkie tries to get to Notre Dame at least once per hour to pick up students at the Grotto. Additionally, Blinkie will start service at noon on Saturday and Sunday starting Monday, October 28, 2019 through Monday, March 23, 2020.”Compared to the regular Midnight Express route, Blinkie is not always a reliable resource, as it doesn’t always maintain a strict schedule and can sometimes fill up quickly, Saint Mary’s sophomore Lisie Fahrenbach said.“Sometimes it’s just really hard to track down Blinkie and figure out when it’s going to come, and then it’ll pass you like five times and you can’t get in it yet,” Fahrenbach said. “I think that could end up being an issue for a lot of people, especially safety-wise, because it’s not going to stop people from going places. It’s just going to make it potentially dangerous for people to go places … when it’s dark out, instead of them having a safe option to get back and forth to areas around Notre Dame.”Blinkie does not serve the same purpose the Transpo Midnight Express and separate routes filled, sophomore Shannon Valley said.“The problem with trying to rely on Blinkie is that getting you over to other places is not its priority,” Valley said. “[Blinkie’s] priority is getting people from the parking lot to their dorms.”While some Saint Mary’s students might resort to using Uber, Lyft or other ride-sharing apps, Valley said others relied on the free bus services.“Girls can’t afford to Uber anytime they want to go somewhere,” Valley said. “This is going to be a really hard thing for them. … If they depend on the buses for things, they’re not going to be able to go anywhere.”Junior Bridget Puetz said she does not think the cancellation will largely affect upperclassmen, but she expressed concerns for first-year students still trying to maneuver making their way across the street to Notre Dame.“I think it’s sad for our underclassmen,” Puetz said. “They’re still trying to figure out their friends, so if [they needed to go home alone], at least they had the bus. If I were a freshman and they took [the Midnight Express] away, I think that I would be really, really affected. I mean, I took it a lot freshman year. It was a really good backup just to know that it was there and to know that it was reliable.”Junior Hunter Kehoe said she also feared for the safety of students walking down Saint Mary’s Road, specifically first-years who are unfamiliar with campus.“I don’t think the administration realizes that girls are going over to Notre Dame very late at night and a lot of them are coming back intoxicated, may it be legal or not,” Kehoe said. “And it is just beyond me that they’re going to allow girls that just got here [and] don’t know their way around … to walk down a road that has one emergency service call on it [and] very, very dim lights.”Leaving students to walk across State Route 933 at night poses a grave danger, Kehoe said.“It scares my mom, because she’s like, ‘I don’t think they’re going to do anything about it until something horrible happens and they’re finally going to wake up about it,’” Kehoe said. “You come here and you expect to have like guardians, because your parents aren’t here. It’s so sad that I have to sit here and say that it’s going to take a horrible accident for [the administrations] to realize that this is the worst decision they could have made.”Kehoe said she thinks relying on ride-sharing apps provides more uncertainty for those seeking a way back to campus and hopes Saint Mary’s Campus Safety will fill the hole left by the cancelled Friday and Saturday services.“Karen Johnson said that the other alternative means of transportation was that girls would have to find Uber rides home,” Kehoe said. “All across the country, there have been reported accidents of young women in Ubers being kidnapped, being killed, getting in the wrong cars that aren’t their Ubers. If you’re going to cancel [the bus services], then every single time I call Security, they better come pick me up … whatever the case is.”Johnson did not immediately respond when asked for comment.Senior Olivia Allen, Saint Mary’s student government association vice president, said Notre Dame, Saint Mary’s and Holy Cross student government executives met Friday to discuss future plans going forward in the wake of the cancellation.“During our meeting on Friday, we discussed different transportation options for the tri-campus community, looking into what other colleges have done and what each SGA can make work financially,” Allen said in an email. “We will be releasing a statement as a tri-campus SGA, so at this time I don’t have a definitive answer as to what the future will hold. We are putting a lot of work into finding a solution and to keep the students safe, but this requires an extensive amount of meetings with SGA advisors across the three schools as well as higher college administration.”Allen said she wanted to remind frustrated students the Midnight Express route was initiated and funded by Notre Dame student government, and Saint Mary’s only became involved in its cancellation late in the decision-making process.“For now, I think it is important to note that Saint Mary’s SGA never paid for the Midnight Express, it has always been a Notre Dame-funded program, as we were only consulted on the matter a few days before the decision was made,” she said.Students in need of a ride between the Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s campuses are highly encouraged to use Blinkie and call Campus Safety, Allen said.“The Saint Mary’s security department really cares about the well-being of the students and is doing their best to help us without the Midnight Express in place,” she said.last_img read more

Sacopee edges GSA 3-2 for state baseball title

first_img Latest Posts Part 2: When the injury is inside your head, some “don’t get it” – July 26, 2016 Part 1: Invisible, incapacitating concussions are sidelining high school athletes – July 19, 2016 Latest posts by Taylor Vortherms (see all) Taylor VorthermsSports Editor at The Ellsworth AmericanTaylor Vortherms covers sports in Hancock County. The St. Louis, Missouri native recently graduated from the Missouri School of Journalism and joined The Ellsworth American in 2013.center_img STANDISH — Sacopee Valley pitcher Roderick Maynard notched eight strikeouts to lead the Hawks past George Stevens Academy in Saturday’s Class C state baseball championship at Saint Joseph’s College.Sacopee Valley (16-3) edged the GSA Eagles 3-2 for its first state title since 1993.“He’s an outstanding pitcher,” GSA coach Dan Kane said of Maynard. “Being a lefty, he made it a little bit tougher. He helped slow down the running game. More importantly, he didn’t allow a lot of guys on base.”Jacob Keenan started for GSA on the mound. The Hawks scored their first run in the bottom of the first. Brady Anderson singled on a line drive to centerfield, and Kyle Jordan followed with a blooper down the right field line to put runners on first and second. Maynard then singled to score Anderson and put Jordan on third. But GSA shortstop Taylor Schildroth ended Sacopee Valley’s scoring by bare-handing a chopper for the Eagles’ third out.This is placeholder textThis is placeholder textSacopee Valley added another run in the bottom of the third. Devin Day walked, and Dana Shea reached on a fielder’s choice that took out Day. GSA’s Marshal Lebel caught a popup in right field for the second out. But before the Eagles could notch a third, Jordan lined to left field for a double that scored Shea.The Hawks scored their third and final run in the fourth. Brandon Burnell led off with a double to deep left field, at which point Beckett Slayton replaced Keenan on the mound. A chopper to first advanced Burnell to third, and he scored on a throwing error to home for a 3-0 lead.“A lot of teams would fold, and we didn’t fold,” Kane said. “We got out there and competed and got after them, and we gave ourselves a chance.”GSA got on the board in the top of the fifth after Keenan singled to centerfield. Will Entwisle followed with a grounder to second, and he beat out the attempted double-play. With just one out, Stefan Simmons had the hit of the night for the Eagles with a triple to centerfield that scored Entwisle. But when Lebel couldn’t make contact in a suicide squeeze attempt, Simmons was tagged out running home. Lebel then struck out, putting a halt to GSA’s offensive momentum.The Eagles found it back in the next inning when Tyler McKenney reached second on a popup that landed between a cluster of three Sacopee players. A Tyler Snow sacrifice bunt advanced McKenney to third, and he reached home on a Schildroth groundout.“Most of the time, when you have a good pitcher like that and he’s got a two or three-run lead in the game, he doesn’t want to walk anybody,” Kane said of Maynard. “We finally started swinging on them — putting a good solid piece on them.”The Eagles held Sacopee Valley in the bottom of the sixth, but they couldn’t get rolling in the final inning. After Dakota Chipman struck out, Keenan singled and stole second. But Maynard would clinch the win with two more strikeouts. The game only lasted an hour and 10 minutes.GSA (18-2) hasn’t won a state championship since its back-to-back titles in 2004 and 2003. But, fortunately for the Eagles, the team is young. They only have two graduating seniors.“Two important ones,” Kane added, referring to Entwisle and Chipman. “But we’re getting ready for next year already.” Bio EHS names new boys’ soccer coach – July 13, 2016last_img read more