One and done compliance training doesn’t cut the mustard

first_imgDo you ever feel like compliance training is constantly on your mind? If you answered yes, you may actually be doing it wrong.We all know how important training is to a sustainable and successful compliance effort. Yet, without a strategic training plan, all that time spent shopping, arranging and traveling for here-and-there sessions eats up time and leaves you with a less-than-satisfactory result.Strategic training plans are more than a calendar of online courses. A truly effective plan takes into account the full picture and asks:What kind of training do we need?Which staff members require the training?Which methods are best for presenting the information?How often does it need to happen?Take teller staff. These professionals require a very different kind of Bank Secrecy Act (BSA) training than mortgage lenders, for example. The same online BSA course for all employees isn’t going to provide the specific, job-related information that individual staff need to meet BSA requirements. Of course, it’s critical training be provided to all employees. It’s just that the training has be relevant to their responsibilities to be truly effective. A generic overview of regulatory requirements won’t cut the mustard.It’s also important to remember a one-and-done approach to training doesn’t work. For instance, tellers must balance strict responsibilities with outstanding member service, which can put regulatory requirements on the back burner. Regular and periodic BSA training for them, as well as other employees, is helpful to keeping compliance right where it should be – at the front of their minds.When tackling the “when” of your strategic plan, consider how your credit union handles training for new employees. Do you assign them a slew of online courses and call it good, or do you take the opportunity to provide them with valuable training that not only covers the rules, but also provides them with critical information specific to your credit union and to their duties?Put yourself in the shoes of the employees charged with completing compliance-driven duties. Imagine you are starting a new job. Your supervisor hands you a list of regulations governing how you should do your job and stops there. He doesn’t instruct you how to do your job so you are in compliance with those regulations. Surprisingly, the “how to” is often overlooked in training sessions. Think of your mortgage lenders. These folks have faced arguably the largest regulatory upheaval in their day-to-day duties in recent years. Training that not only covers the regulatory requirements, but also includes the specific processes your credit union has implemented to comply with those requirements, is likely very welcome.After you’ve mapped out what specific types of training the employees in each area of your credit union need, think about how often the training should be provided. When regulations change is an easy one. Most all credit unions conduct training around important updates. But, what about the regulations that aren’t getting all the attention? Are you remembering to include those in the training plan?Again, we often rely on online courses to meet training requirements, but a review should be conducted regularly to determine whether those courses really do provide the level of training your employees need and deserve to perform the requirements of their jobs.All of this can sound a bit daunting. Fortunately, credit unions have many resources, ranging from free webinars to compliance consultants, to help them set up, manage and even conduct training for staff. If you continue to be overwhelmed even after finding help, get that chin up by thinking about this quote from Peter F. Drucker: “No one learns so much about a subject as one who is forced to teach it.” 38SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Cindy Williams Cindy Williams is vice president of regulatory compliance for PolicyWorks, a national leader of credit union compliance solutions. She can be reached at [email protected] Web: www.policyworksllc.com Detailslast_img read more

Applications being taken for Ms. Wheelchair Iowa contest

first_imgWATERLOO — A new advocate for Iowans with disabilities will be chosen next weekend in Waterloo.The Ms. Wheelchair Iowa Contest is scheduled for March 7th and contestants are still welcome to apply and compete for the crown. Jenn Wolff, of Waverly, is a former titleholder and is one of this year’s event organizers. She says you need to be a U.S. citizen who’s at least 21 and have lived in Iowa at least six months.“We are looking for women who use wheelchairs 100% of the time for mobility,” Wolff says. “We’re hoping that they want to educate the general public, advocate for others with disabilities. We’re really hoping to build this competition into a stronger community of women with disabilities.” Wolff says the winner will be picked based on her accomplishments since the onset of the disability.She notes it’s not a beauty pageant so there’s no swimsuit competition and contestants don’t need to perform some sort of talent.Wolff says, “It is really more focused on building education and empowerment and advocacy, in building a person’s confidence, public speaking ability, and civic engagement.”The winner’s duties will revolve around her platform and her ability to travel — which may take her from local parades, churches, civic groups and schools to the state capitol, the governor’s office and beyond. Wolff, who was Ms. Wheelchair Iowa 2011, says being the titleholder had a profound impact on her life — for the better.“There is power in the tiara! It gets you into rooms that you might not be able to otherwise get into to speak,” Wolff says. “It really, really helped my confidence and ability to public speak. Going to nationals is unlike anything else because you’re in a room full of women in wheelchairs and you will never, ever get that experience anywhere else. It was amazing.”The Iowa winner will represent the state at the Ms. Wheelchair America event, scheduled for August in Little Rock, Arkansas. To apply for the state contest, search for “Ms. Wheelchair Iowa Contest 2020” on Facebook and scroll down to find a link to the application.last_img read more