Bill Murray’s Reaction To This NOLA Band Playing ‘Ghostbusters’ Is Priceless

first_imgIn December of 2014, beloved actor Bill Murray found himself in a crowded bar called the Three Muses on Frenchmen Street in New Orleans, LA. The house band, led by trombonist Glen David Andrews, decided to treat Murray to a familiar tune, and busted out in a performance of “Ghostbusters” by Ray Parker, Jr., best known for its role as the movie’s theme song.While the story made the rounds at the time, it wasn’t until Andrews posted the video last night were we able to see how it went down. Thanks to a YouTube user only known by Daniel, we can watch Murray’s reaction as a NOLA brass group surprises him with the theme music. You can also see Jon Favreau sitting near Murray, enjoying the festivities.“It was one of the most exciting moments of my career, to be sitting next to Bill Murray with him smiling and them playing ‘Ghostbusters’ to him from like 10 feet away,” Favreau said in an interview with Mashable. “Then he leaned over to me and he was like, ‘You know, Jon, you really need a theme song.’ He really got a kick out of it.” What fun![H/T NOLA.com]last_img read more

Residential Life, Student Affairs discuss new residential life policies at special senate meeting

first_imgMarie Fazio | The Observer Associate vice president of residential life Heather Rakoczy Russell and vice president for Student Affairs Erin Hoffmann Harding attend a special senate meeting Tuesday evening to address new residential life policies.“We didn’t call this policy the senior exclusion policy. We called this policy differentiating on and off-campus experience,” Rakoczy Russell said. “What that means is what things off-campus will have access to and the ways that they will build community will look different than how on-campus students will.”Hoffmann Harding said the journey to the April 11 announcement began over four years ago, when Flaherty and Dunne Halls were opened to address the issue of overcrowding on campus. “We had seen a significant increase in proportion of seniors living off-campus,” Hoffmann Harding said. “We wanted to understand how important it was for all of us to have upperclassmen leadership in those communities. As wonderful as I hope all of your hall staff are, it’s equally valuable to have upperclassmen down the hall.”To determine the policies, officials used input from student focus groups and discussions and demographic analysis to determine trends in movement off-campus and possible factors that would entice students to say. Residential life systems at Vanderbilt University and University of Dayton were used as benchmarks, she said.“We believe deeply that this residential experience matters — it’s part of the undergraduate education,” Hoffmann Harding said. “We think it’s something that makes us different, we hope it’s something that makes us special. We hope ultimately that it’s a place where each student feels as if they belong.” This research led to the Sept. 2017 announcement of the six-semester residency requirement, which was announced prior to the application process of that year. A similar negative reaction to a six semester requirement overshadowed the announcement that several incentives would be announced as the first class affected by the residency requirement, the class of 2022, became upperclassmen. Rakoczy Russell said the team did not initially plan to announce the on and off-campus differentiation policies April 11, but were urged to include it in the announcement by rectors and members of residential communities. “We decided to tack on an extra item to the April 11 announcement, mainly so that first-year students will know that by the time they are seniors there will be a difference between the on and off-campus experience,” Rakoczy Russell said. “What that difference will be will be decided in conversation with students over the course of the next academic year with the idea that by this time next year, we can say fully fleshed out what that looks like.”Details are still undecided regarding senior fellow positions and block meal plans, although Rakoczy Russell expects to have official practices implemented by the fall of 2021.Rakoczy Russell said students have frequently mentioned the lack of consistency between residence halls — specifically across gender lines — in focus groups. To investigate this issue, 100% of rectors participated in an anonymous survey regarding enforcement of the policy.“Depending on the hall, depending on the rector, the size of the community, the perceived priorities or needs of that community, there were different practices relative to each hall, some of it divided on gender norms,” Rakoczy Russell said. “What I heard from students over time was that there was great dissatisfaction not knowing what they could count on as a hallmark of a residential community.”Rakoczy Russell said the survey found practices regarding off-campus senior differed between halls. This is a recent development, she said — about 10 years ago, some residence halls began allowing students to compete in interhall sports teams, particularly football, which eventually spread to other practices including dances. She noted future plans to send an email every August that details changes in consistency policies for that year. Katherine Fugate, an off-campus junior who plans to stay off-campus next year, said a certain kind of student  — one who lacks the “mainstream Notre Dame identity of being white, Catholic upper-class student who is heterosexual and cisgender” — may not find community in their residence hall. She cited Notre Dame’s commitment to Catholic Social Teaching, specifically preferential option for the poor, as a reason to allow those who would like to move off to do so without repercussions. “Any conversations about inclusion also include conversations about who’s excluded from those activities,” Fugate said. Hoffmann Harding said although individual student needs differ, student discussion groups revealed students of color and students receiving significant aid were more likely to stay on campus. “The single biggest and most significant predictor of whether or not a student moved was actually not receiving financial aid,” Hoffmann Harding said.As a possible solution to those who do not feel at home in their assigned dorms, the interhall transfer process was streamlined. Students are no longer required to speak with both rectors, and an exemption process — which overrides housing decisions — was put in place. Hoffmann Harding expressed a desire to continue the conversation with students during the process of shaping the policy throughout next school year. “As much as we regret that maybe some of our intentions were misunderstood here, I actually think it’s really exciting,” Hoffmann Harding said. “This is a conversation that matters. We know that you care. You care about these communities that you were a part of and you care about the experiences that you had there and that to me is very powerful.”Tags: Housing policy, residential life, Six Semester Policy, Student Affairs, student senate Student senate was joined by associate vice president of residential life Heather Rakoczy Russell and vice president for Student Affairs Erin Hoffmann Harding for a special meeting to address recently announced residential life policies Tuesday night in Duncan Student Center. The policies — which include incentives for on-campus seniors, enhancements for all students and efforts that differentiate on and off-campus experiences — were announced April 11 and met with major pushback from the student body.last_img read more

England Aim To Continue Dominance Against West Indies

first_imgSouthampton: Tournament favorites England will look to continue their dominance when they take on power-packed West Indies in their fourth encounter of the ongoing World Cup at The Rose Bowl, here on Friday.England, who started off their campaign in an impressive manner winning comfortably against South Africa, faced a shock defeat at the hands of Pakistan in their second encounter. However, they came back strongly and aced every department against Bangladesh as they first put up 386/6 on board and then bundled them out for 280 in the 49th over.The hosts would want to continue with the crucial form of Jason Roy, Joe Root and Eoin Morgan.In bowling, they have the likes of Jofra Archer who can bamboozle any opposition with his extreme pace and bounce. In Ben Stokes, they have an all-rounder who can give them priceless overs in the middle and score brisk runs whenever required. Also, they have Adil Rashid and Mark Wood who are more than capable of taking wickets at any stage of the game.Meanwhile, wicketkeeper-batsman Jos Buttler has been declared fit to play against the West Indies. Buttler, who scored 64 from 44 balls in Saturday’s win, did not take the field after suffering heavy bruising to his right hip with Jonny Bairstow taking over as wicketkeeper.On the other hand, Windies will hope that their bowlers come with a much improved performance as compared to the one they came out against Australia where they squandered the early advantage and conceded a total of around 300. Their batsmen also need to come to the party and make sure they play with application and concentration. Their shot selection was poor against the defending champions and that would be something which Jason Holder would desperatley want them to work on.England, with two wins in three matches, are sitting at the third spot in the points table whereas West Indies are at the sixth position with three points. And a loss in Friday’s match would make the journey tougher for both the teams in the upcoming matches. IANSAlso Read: World Cup 2019: England ride Jason Roy’s ton to script big win over Bangladeshlast_img read more