lunch! exhibition returns to London next week

first_imgOne of the UK’s biggest shows for food-to-go trades, lunch! will be at the Business Design Centre, London on 21-22 September.The show attracts around 6,000 people a year and has experienced a significant year-on-year growth in attendance since it launched in 2008, while exhibitor numbers have reached over 350 companies showcasing a mix of food, drink, packaging, catering equipment and technology.lunch! will feature over 25 keynote sessions across two theatres with high-profile brands, including Starbucks, Pret A Manger, Costa Coffee and Welcome Break to share their expertise in the industry.Chris Brazier, events director for lunch! told British Baker: “The preparations are going really well, we’ve been speaking to our 340 exhibitors in the build-up to make sure they are happy and are as excited as we are. We have never had so many new products for the food-to-go sector being launched at a show and it’s great to see that the sector is in such good shape.“I really expect the best show we have ever had. With the amount of amazing new products, exciting new start-up companies, inspirational seminars and the quality of buyers that we have seen registering from across the food to go sector the signs are great. We’ve never had so many entries into the Innovation Challenge so we need the help of all the buyers to vote for their favourite innovation on day one of the show before revealing who wins the big prizes on day two.”Brazier felt that the baking industry has had a great impact on the food-to-go sector. He believes that baking companies who exhibit at the show see some of the very best results and research has shown that it is the number one product type that buyers are looking for.Earlier this month, Susan Yarnell, the manager of A Great Little Place, was shortlisted for her sandwich design skills at the Café Life Awards held at the lunch! exhibition.last_img read more

South Bend resident relates pro-life activism

first_imgShawn Sullivan, a lawyer, real-estate agent and pro-life activist from the South Bend community, spoke at Saint Mary’s on Tuesday night about with his involvement with the pro-life movement as director of the Apostolate of Divine Mercy in Service of Human Life.Sullivan presented a half-hour long talk for students and faculty in Stapleton Lounge titled, “The Pro-Life Movement in Saint Mary’s Backyard: the Who, What, Where, Why, When and How.” The event is the first in a series during Saint Mary’s Right To Life week, Saint Mary’s Respect Life Club member junior Jana Zuniga said.To contextualize the closest abortion clinic’s location, Sullivan began his discussion by drawing a map of where the clinic is located in relation to the Apostolate of Divine Mercy Chapel.“The epicenter of what’s going on in the pro-life movement is here,” Sullivan said. “This is where the spiritual warfare occurs. This is where Jesus does battle. We have a real presence right here.”Sullivan is currently the vigil director of 40 Days for Life campaign held during both the spring and fall seasons, he said. Since the campaign began in 2008, it has evolved with the Life Center, he said.“We eventually got a deal worked out [where] we would just come out and be there, and by the grace of the person who owned it allowing us to be there,” Sullivan said. “We did a spring campaign in 2009, and it allowed us to be more of a focal point when Obama came to Notre Dame in 2009. We got to meet a lot of people and evangelize the movement even more.”Sullivan said after his 12th campaign he spoke with Bishop Kevin C. Rhoades about putting a chapel next to the abortion clinic.“We [were] having meetings with the bishop, and we put a name to it, the Apostolate of Divine Mercy in Service of Human Life,” Sullivan said. “Everything else just [keeps] brewing, just keeps coming together.”Students were encouraged to visit the Chapel and consider participating in sidewalk counseling, Sullivan said.“It’s really fun to come out and see what we’ve got going on,” Sullivan said. “I really invite you to just show up. You can stop by on your own. [It’s] a principal way to spend your time. Our training is really simple. It’s really streamline, trusting God to be your shield.”Whether counselors talk with mothers for five seconds or 10 minutes, those words matter, Sullivan said.“So, say you’re talking to somebody for five seconds,” he said. “You could sit down with them and have a conversation. We call that ministry life support. If we get somebody to sit down, then a whole other ministry kicks in. We’ve got to go disintegrate their problems. It hits across the board. They can’t go home to parents. They can’t go home to boyfriends. They’re going to get fired.”In Sullivan’s time with the Life Center, he has witnessed more than 50 saves, meaning his team’s influence changed many women’s minds about aborting their babies, he said. The Life Center keeps in touch with all of the moms they come in contact with, often sending them necessary items for their child, he said.“I know we had a great save on the anniversary of Roe vs. Wade,” Sullivan said. “The husband didn’t want her to get it, and she didn’t want to get an abortion, but the last two ladies who got pregnant at her job were fired. So, we had to promise her legal help, save the marriage, save everything.”Tags: 40 Days of Life, Life Center, Pro-life, saint mary’slast_img read more

Bar to study the need for unbundled legal services

first_imgBar to study the need for unbundled legal services June 1, 2001 Regular News Bar to study the need for unbundled legal services Mark D. Killian Associate Editor Facing an ever-increasing number of pro se litigants in family courts, the Supreme Court has asked the Bar to study the possible need for “unbundled legal services.” If the committee finds the need exists for unbundled legal services, Chief Justice Major B. Harding, in an administrative order, asked the Bar to submit a proposed rule amendment to facilitate the use of such services no later than March 1, 2001. “This is a very significant committee that will be investigating an important subject to most attorneys,” said Bar President Edith Osman, noting any changes could have a profound impact on lawyers who bill by the hour. The unbundling of legal services — also sometimes known as discrete task representation — would allow the client to select which activities will be performed by the lawyer and which will be performed by the client, if they are performed at all. The client may also specify the extent of each service the lawyer is to perform. Osman said the study committee also must investigate how unbundled legal services might transcend family law or if it can be limited to family practice. That, she said, is why she intends to appoint lawyers who practice in the areas of real property and commercial litigation as well as members of the family bar to the study committee. “The purpose of unbundling legal service is to provide greater access to the legal system to more people,” Osman said. “For example, middle class clients could obtain a lawyer for just those parts of a case they are concerned about.” Family Law Section Chair Ky Koch said limited representation in a divorce case could be as simple as helping decide who gets to keep the cat or as complex as handling child custody matters while the couple works out the financial split, or the lawyer drafts a qualified domestic relations order and the divorcing couple handles the of rest the case. Looking into unbundled services responds to the proliferation of pro se litigants in family cases, particularly divorce, and the Bar needs to consider unbundled legal services to accommodate the needs of people who use the system, Koch said. “Pro se litigants are a majority of our customers in the divorce arena and we have to be responsive to them,” Koch said. “What we have been faced with is how do we respond to that need, both to the people who don’t have lawyers and to make sure that legal rights and representation are provided when needed.” Looking at the pro se problems is a balancing act, he said. “We can’t go into this with the sole perspective of protecting lawyers’ pocketbooks, but we have got to also recognize that things are changing within the family law division and we have to meet those needs,” Koch said. As it now stands, Koch said, providing limited representation is not precluded by Bar rules, “it is simply that there are all kinds of problems related to it.” Is it ethical for a lawyer to involve himself or herself only in a limited portion of a case? From a legal malpractice perspective, what is the response from the insurance carrier about limited representation? Will judges permit lawyers to take part in one aspect of a case and not another? “Most judges take the position, and I think reasonably so, that if you are on this case, you are on this case,” Koch said. “It is not like you are kind of pregnant — you are either on or off.” Bar Ethics Counsel Elizabeth Tarbert said the Supreme Court has generally declined to adopt rules that apply only to lawyers in a specific practice area. In 1969, Tarbert said, the court rejected a rule intended to govern the conduct of in-house counsel for insurance companies. More recently, Tarbert said, the court declined to adopt a rule that would address the conduct of family law practitioners. “Specifically, the court said `the petitioners have not demonstrated that there is a need to treat those members of the Bar who practice family law differently than other members of the Bar,’” Tarbert said, citing Amendment to Rules Regulating the Florida Bar — Rule 4-1.18, Client-Lawyer Relationships in Family Law Matters, 662 So. 2d 1246 (Fla. 1995). Tarbert said the Professional Ethics Committee has followed the court’s general precept. As an example, the panel published Florida Ethics Opinion 90-4, which indicated the rule prohibiting communication with represented persons applies to Department of Justice attorneys when the DOJ argued otherwise. “Florida was at the vanguard of states that declared that DOJ attorneys could not just try to exempt themselves from state rules,” Tarbert said. Tarbert said there is now only one rule approved by the Supreme Court which specifically addresses one type of practitioner — Rule 4-3.8, Special Responsibilities of a Prosecutor, which deals with the conduct of prosecutors in criminal cases. Colorado’s new limited representation rules went into effect last July. “Colorado lawyers and judges supported the idea that some lawyer help to pro se parties is better than none,” Colorado Supreme Court Chief Justice Mary Mullarkey told that state’s Judicial Conference last year. “The rules are meant to achieve candor to the court and to allow citizens to obtain legal services without having to hire an attorney for the entire litigation or go without.” The rules require a pro se party to disclose on the pleading the name of the attorney who assisted in drafting the pleading. An attorney must advise the pro se party of that requirement and also to explain the risk involved in obtaining limited representation in contrast to full representation in litigation. Under the revised civil rules, limited representation by an attorney does not constitute an entry of appearance, and the court and opposing parties are not required to serve the assisting attorney. The Colorado rules also provide: “Whether these rules will function as intended depends on the willingness of bench and bar to have them work,” Justice Mullarkey said. Koch noted Arizona also has similar unbundled legal services rules; however, it is difficult to compare the Arizona and Colorado experiences to Florida because Arizona’s rules differ sharply from Florida’s, and Colorado’s rules have been in place for less than two years. “In Arizona when pro se litigants come in, they have people at a desk that answer questions, and if there is a feature of their case these pro se litigants need assistance with they have a list of lawyers who will assist them — on an unbundled basis — as to particular topics,” Koch said, noting, too, that Arizona has no UPL rules. Anyone interested in serving on the committee or providing comments to the panel may contact The Florida Bar, Office of the Executive Director, 651 E. Jefferson Street, Tallahassee 32399-2300. The attorney/client privilege applies to limited representation as it does to full representation under the ethical rules. The appearance of the attorney’s name on the pro se pleading is not the occasion for other parties or the court to question the assisting attorney regarding the case or the actions of the pro se party. The rules do not contemplate the opposing party questioning the pro se party about the preparation of the pleading or inquiring into or discovering the attorney’s versus the client’s own drafts of the pleading. If the matter of sanctions should arise because the client did not disclose the name of the attorney, or the attorney did not advise the client to make the disclosure, the matter should be handled by the court apart from the merits of the pro se party’s case and include confidential in-camera treatment of papers, conversations or other matters that implicate the attorney/client privilege. last_img

Model Madeline Stuart on why she loves her home in Indooroopilly

first_img 1. Where do you live and why? 2. What do you love about your home? MORE Beekeeper Hayley Mason on why she loves Toowoomba 3. What would you change about your home? More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus9 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market9 hours agoNothing. I love my home just the way it is. I live in Indooroopilly. It is where I was born and raised but I spend about six months of the year travelling internationally for work in the fashion industry. My home is everything to me. It is where I can re-centre and spend time with my friends. It is always wonderful to come back from overseas to familiar surroundings, instead of living out of a suitcase. I also love that I live on a large block of land. I have privacy and do not have to worry about noise restraints. Model Madeline Stuart is an advocate for adversity. Photo Lachie MillardBrisbane model Madeline Stuart is an advocate for inclusion. Born with Down syndrome, she provides inspiration to many as a woman dealing with a disability. A recent documentary film captured her bravery and strength in her relentless pursuit of her modelling career. However, center_img I live on acreage with no public transport, so I feel it is very safe. There is no crime and it is very quiet. 4. What is the best thing about your suburb? 5. If money was no option, what would be your fantasy home and where? Villa in Capri? Chalet in the Swiss Alps? when Madeline is not overseas in front of a camera, or on the catwalk, she’s at her home in Indooroopilly. Here she tells what she loves about her suburb. I am living in my dream home. I would love a holiday home in New York, because I love working there and have lots of friends there.last_img read more