Sewanee seeks untold story of university’s ties to slavery, segregation…

first_img Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA The University of the South in Sewanee, Tennessee, hosts a dedication ceremony May 16, 1940, for a memorial to Confederate Gen. Edmund Kirby-Smith, who also taught math at Sewanee after the Civil War. Photo courtesy of University Archives and Special Collections: The University of the South[Episcopal News Service] Sewanee: The University of the South in Tennessee sits atop a plateau, and students interested in viewing the expanse of valley to the west are invited to hike some of the more than 50 miles of trails across the campus, known as the Domain.Seeing those landscapes is enough to know their beauty. “The stretch of Perimeter Trail from Morgan’s Steep to Armfield Bluff affords wonderful views to the valley and into deep coves,” one professor recommended in a 2008 Sewanee Magazine article profiling the best day hikes on Sewanee’s 13,000 acres.The names given these places, however, reflect a time when Sewanee’s early leaders openly embraced a belief in white racial superiority. Oliver Morgan was a member of one of the most prominent slaveholding families in Louisiana, and John Armfield was part owner in a leading U.S. slave-trading operation.Both men contributed to the original founding of the university by dioceses of the Episcopal Church in 1857. Church leaders across the South who supported the new university saw it as their Christian duty to help maintain the slaveholding order, according to Woody Register, a Sewanee history professor who is leading a six-year research project on Sewanee’s early ties to slavery and segregation.“The University of the South was founded to be the slavers’ university, to represent the interests of a slaveholding society,” Register said, and that mission was clearly seen through a Christian lens that saw slavery as morally defensible. “You can’t separate its church purposes, its religious purposes, from the social purposes of the university.”That vision never materialized. By the time Sewanee opened its doors in 1868, the Civil War was over and slavery had been abolished. How the University of the South recalibrated its mission in that new order is one focus of the university-sponsored Project on Slavery, Race, and Reconciliation.“I like to think of this as there being two foundings,” Vice Chancellor John McCardell Jr. told Episcopal News Service. “One, the founding that failed, and one that succeeded.” The founding that succeeded, he added, was not driven by a desire to maintain slavery.Even 150 years after that second founding, those who fought to maintain slavery are still honored at Sewanee, and such public honors, especially those bestowed on Confederate army leaders, have faced increased scrutiny at Sewanee and institutions around the United States in the aftermath of deadly violence at a white supremacist, neo-Confederate rally in Charlottesville, Virginia last summer.Those events in August sparked a national debate over Confederate imagery in public spaces. Register’s team at Sewanee, barely a month into its research, was asked to provide information supporting university administrators’ decision to relocate a prominent memorial honoring Confederate Gen. Edmund Kirby-Smith, who taught at Sewanee after the Civil War.Re-examining Confederate symbols, though numerous on campus, is not the sole focus of Sewanee’s project. The Project on Slavery, Race, and Reconciliation, part of a coalition of three dozen universities known as the Universities Studying Slavery, aims to expand the narrative of the university’s founding and its first century beyond what can be told through Sewanee’s own archival documents.Register’s team is “casting our net much more broadly” for new details of that untold story by examining records kept across the South in places where the university received its early financial support – including in some of the 28 Episcopal dioceses that still own and govern the university today.The project’s work also is integrated into Sewanee’s academic life, with several students serving on the project working group.“If we can acknowledge the past, then we can progress, so I think this is a huge step,” said Jonathan Brown, a senior who is on the project’s group.Brown, an American studies major, is black and grew up in Silver Spring, Maryland. He chose to attend Sewanee after receiving a scholarship, and he didn’t know much about the university’s history at first. In his four years there, he fell in love with Sewanee and its close-knit community while having the opportunity to learn more about its past.With the Project on Slavery, Brown has helped organize some of its public events while preparing the younger students on the team for the work they will do in years ahead.“I’ve loved every moment of it,” he said of his work on the project. “I’m really excited to see where it takes off.”Silver Spring is a suburb of Washington, D.C., and Brown recalls conversations with his parents about the research Georgetown University was conducting on its historical complicity with slavery, including its sale in 1838 of 272 slaves to keep the university running.The Episcopal Church has taken similar steps to confront its past. Presiding Bishop Michael Curry has made racial reconciliation one of his top priorities, most notably through the “Becoming Beloved Community” initiative. And General Convention has passed numerous resolutions on the subject, including a 2006 resolution about slavery.“The Episcopal Church acknowledges its history of participation in this sin and the deep and lasting injury which the institution of slavery and its aftermath have inflicted on society and on the Church,” the resolution said, and it called on each diocese to compile evidence of that complicity.Racial reconciliation also is a goal of Sewanee’s project, as it reaches beyond the campus to foster discussion in the community about these issues. One recent example was the Feb. 19 forum titled “Reading and Rereading History” featuring two Sewanee professors discussing symbols of racial injustice on campus. The event was held off campus to encourage a mix of students and residents to participate.“I certainly think the what we’re doing here is consistent with what the church is seeking to do,” said McCardell, the vice chancellor, who is an Episcopalian.Research on roots in slavery gains in urgencySewanee has grappled for years with how to balance an appreciation for its history with a desire to confront and move beyond its past ties to racial oppression.A 2005 New York Times story detailed changes Sewanee was making at that time to appeal to a more geographically and racially diverse pool of potential students – changes dismissed as destructive or unnecessary by some alumni. Despite the removal of some overtly racist symbols, administrators told the Times they had no intention of getting rid of certain other landmarks that had been fixtures on the campus for decades, such as the Kirby-Smith memorial.The university’s 2012 strategic plan also emphasized a commitment to fostering a diverse campus community, and in the 2015-2016 academic year, Sewanee created several task forces of students and faculty to study ways of fulfilling that commitment.That effort came just as the national conversation around Confederate symbols had deepened after a June 2015 shooting in Charleston, South Carolina, in which a gunman with Confederate sympathies murdered nine people at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church.In fall 2015, Sewanee removed a portrait of Leonidas Polk from public display. Polk was the Episcopal bishop who led the drive to create the University of the South before joining the Confederate army as a general during the Civil War. (He was killed in battle.) A portrait known as “Sword Over the Gown” shows Polk vested as a bishop but with his Confederate uniform draped over a chair and his military sword beside him.The portrait, said to be a copy of the original, was moved from Convocation Hall to Sewanee’s archives, sparking a mix of support and criticism.The following year, Sewanee joined the Universities Studying Slavery. McCardell and other top administrators asked Register in August 2016 to lead the Sewanee Project on Slavery, and over the winter, Register and a graduate student, Tanner Potts, drafted a plan for the six-year project that launched in July 2017.Register expected to spend two or three years researching the history of the campus’s tributes to Kirby-Smith and other Confederate and slaveholding figures, inviting input from all sides before recommending any changes.By fall 2017, however, the work had grown in urgency.“We did not anticipate the way in which events would develop over the summer, and part of our mission all along was to evaluate and figure out what to do with the many, many memorials and monuments to the antebellum slaveholding order and the Confederacy on our campus,” Register said. “The events of Charlottesville accelerated the schedule for doing that.”Other Episcopal institutions, too, have fought to keep pace with current events while assessing what to do about Confederate symbols. Washington National Cathedral had embarked on what it thought would be a two-year process of discerning whether to keep or remove images of the Confederate flag in its stained-glass windows. After the violence in Charlottesville, the dean announced abruptly last fall that no further deliberation was needed, and the flags were removed.The clashes between hate groups and counterprotesters in Charlottesville centered around the city’s decision to take down a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. Soon after those clashes, McCardell said he was contacted by a descendant of Kirby-Smith asking that the memorial at Sewanee be moved to the campus cemetery, where it would be less likely to become a flashpoint for controversy.Edmund Kirby-Smith was a Confederate general who later taught mathematics at the University of the South at Sewanee, Tennessee, where this monument to the general is located. It was moved last year from this location to the university cemetery. Photo: Caroline CarsonMcCardell moved forward with that plan in the fall, after consulting with Register’s team about the history of the memorial. It had been proposed in the 1920s by the Daughters of the Confederacy, but because fundraising was difficult during the Great Depression, it wasn’t installed until 1940, Register said.His team confirmed the memorial was on campus property, dispelling rumors that the land had been given away long ago. And research into the memorial’s dedication ceremony, which bore a military motif and featured display of the Confederate battle flag, indicated that Kirby-Smith was honored more for his Civil War record than for his later career as a math professor.The university moved the memorial to the cemetery with little fanfare.“The idea is to understand things as best we can before we act,” Register said.Studying the past to shape Sewanee’s futureRegister, a native of Alabama, graduated from Sewanee in 1980 and has taught history at the university for 26 years. (He received his doctorate from Brown University, an early trailblazer among the Universities Studying Slavery.)As Register expanded his understanding of Sewanee’s ties to slavery and segregation, he gradually worked some of those details into his teaching and scholarly articles. About three years ago, he helped produce an exhibition on Sewanee manhood called “Founded to Make Men” that foreshadowed his present work with the Project on Slavery.“It changed how I thought about the history of the university,” Register said.His research suggested that Sewanee originally was conceived as a place where Southern men would be taught to be leaders of the slaveholding order in the antebellum South. He disputes criticisms that learning more about that history and its representation in present-day landmarks is a step toward “destroying the past.”“It’s quite the opposite,” he said. “We’re trying to better understand the past, and there’s a lot here that we need to know more about.”As examples, Register noted that some dormitories are named for Confederate military figures, such as Charles Todd Quintard, a Confederate chaplain who later became the Diocese of Tennessee’s first post-war bishop and served as Sewanee’s vice chancellor. (Quintard is celebrated by the Episcopal Church every Feb. 16.) Another dormitory is named for Josiah Gorgas, a Confederate general who later served as president of the University of Alabama.“I think Woody’s approach to this has been quite sound and in the best tradition of academia,” McCardell said. “Let’s study the issue from all angles. … The perspective of time ought never to be underestimated. The decisions made in the heat of the moment are not necessary the wisest decisions.”The work of the Project on Slavery has revealed how many connections to Sewanee’s antebellum roots are found scattered around the campus, sometimes in subtle ways, as with the various place names taken from the men who gave money for the university’s founding.“The Kirby-Smith memorial is an easy one to address, in a way,” Register said. “There are others. Our campus is paved with monuments and memorials.”Will changing the names of places on campus help achieve that goal? Register’s team is not yet ready to make recommendations, though there is a broad spectrum of options available, from changing names and moving monuments to creating digital resources that provide deeper historical context for landmarks that evoke an earlier era.“The most important thing first is that we make this history known and not make the argument that, that was long ago and it doesn’t matter,” Register said. “It does matter, and it should matter to us today.“And to be honest and forthright about it is critical, especially critical if you’re going to understand what having this history does for your thinking about the mission and the goals of the university.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Rector Pittsburgh, PA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem March 7, 2018 at 12:58 am Descendants of slavers, and of Sewanee alum who celebrated that tradition, should indeed repent, seek to atone, seek to repair in behalf of our ancestors and to make amends for pride and privileges derived from slavery. The depth and perpetuation of our racism is manifested when whites presume to choreography reconciliation. I recommend dropping that term from the project. Sons and daughters of Sewanee alums are not the ANC. March 6, 2018 at 5:20 pm I’m greatful Sewanee is undertaking this project. I was christened in the Church of England. My mother chose not to worship as Anglican due to racism. When I moved to America as a young girl, I grew up in a different religion. I have since returned. America has the grave sin of slavery in its history. If we don’t talk about it, we will get nowhere. As a black woman, I am torn between having institutions tear down symbols or leave them up for historical value and discussion. I look forward to what The Episcopal Church is doing. Sewanee seeks untold story of university’s ties to slavery, segregation in reconciliation project Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Michelle Samuels says: Tags Rector Smithfield, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Music Morristown, NJ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Advocacy Peace & Justice, Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH David A. Elliott III says: Brenda Woemmel says: Lallie Lloyd says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA March 8, 2018 at 3:34 am Thank you for presenting this work. As a former long time EFM mentor (and graduate), Sewanee holds a special place in mhy heart. We need to be doing this in every corner of tne church. Theological Education Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Job Listing Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Hopkinsville, KY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab By David PaulsenPosted Mar 6, 2018 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Dana Strong (Nick) Wyman says: March 7, 2018 at 1:13 am I was pleased to learn that Sewanee is pursuing historical research to present an accurate picture of the institution’srole and involvement with slavery, racism and discrimination. I look forward to the new scholarship and changes Sewanee will make to reconcile our Episcopal past with our goal to cleanse our soul as an institution for the 21st Century. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 March 6, 2018 at 5:11 pm Thank you for another great article by David Paulsen! I’m eager to see how we as a church grow and are transformed as we develop a shared and historically accurate understanding about how some benefited from slavery, others resisted slavery, and many were brutalized in ways that continue to harm individuals, families, communities, and our nation today. I wonder what our Episcopal independent schools would learn about their founders and histories were they to embark on similar journeys? March 7, 2018 at 1:06 am P S my dad, Sam Madison Powell loved Sewanee. He went to the academy and the college. The former presiding bishop, David Rose, who went on to seminary, was his classmate and good friend. Rector Tampa, FL Dianne Aid says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Albany, NY Rector Shreveport, LA March 6, 2018 at 4:20 pm Thanks for the catch, Peggy, and the history lesson. We’ve fixed that spelling. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME March 6, 2018 at 9:18 pm It is clear to me that all of this is being approached in a thoughtful, scholarly, sound manner. It is vital for us to be honest about our past, both with ourselves and with others. Sewanee is a distinguished institution of higher learning, with a national reputation that we want to maintain. The seminary has historically been, and I think continues to be, the nurturing place of important clergy leaders of the Episcopal Church — people who have made a great difference in our quest for justice and grace in the country, in the name of Jesus Christ and HIs Good News. It may be that some of the symbols on campus should be removed or changed and that others may remain, with a recast narrative to explain them and conscientiously celebrate their meaning to the university for good. This project is in good hands, and all of us should support it. Press Release Service Comments (10) March 6, 2018 at 4:06 pm The spring in Silver Spring, MD is singular. The town was named for ONE spring. Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Peggy Goldsmith says: Rector Bath, NC David Paulsen says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Knoxville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Martinsville, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Belleville, IL Rector Collierville, TN Racial Justice & Reconciliation, Submit a Press Release Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Peggy Dobbins says: Featured Events March 6, 2018 at 5:09 pm I attended both the College and the Seminary. For my Honors Degree(Optime Merins)from Seminary in 1969, I submitted a paper entitled “The Church and the Black Man” examining the Church’s relationship to slavery and the civil rights movement. It changed my life and much has changed since then Peggy Dobbins says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Comments are closed. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 last_img read more

Citizenship question would taint census

first_imgCombined with President Donald Trump’s anti-immigrant rhetoric, asking about citizenship status will depress the count among immigrant communities and result in inaccurate information.In a memo explaining his reasoning, Ross admitted that adding the question could depress census participation.But he argued that asking about citizenship would impose a “limited burden” on those filling out census forms, because individual responses are anonymous.Placing the burden of proof on those objecting to the change, Ross said that “no one provided evidence that reinstating a citizenship question on the decennial census would materially decrease response rates.”But it is Ross’ responsibility to oversee a fair census. There is enough evidence, anecdotal and statistical, for serious worry about the citizenship question.Census researchers have recently noted instances of heightened concern among immigrant respondents about cooperating with the count.Immigrant response rates to the yearly American Community Survey, which asks about citizenship, are lower than nonimmigrant response rates. Even without a citizenship question, the 2010 Census overcounted the non-Hispanic population and undercounted the Hispanic population. Morever, an absence of evidence would not be proof of no harm.It was Ross’ duty to show that the harm would be acceptably limited before adding a new question. By his own admission, he failed to do so.New census forms should be and generally are thoroughly tested before rollout, a process that takes years.This question is being added hastily to the form in the midst of its first and only dry run for the 2020 count.If immigrant communities are substantially undercounted, Democrats will lose seats in Congress and in statehouses.Political districts contain equal numbers of people, citizen and noncitizen alike.Nonvoters, of course, cannot choose who represents them in Washington or in state capitals. Categories: Editorial, OpinionThe following editorial appeared in The Washington Post.The census Bureau’s once-a-decade count of the country’s population determines where federal money goes and how political power is divided among states.Whether by design or incompetence, the Trump administration is threatening to rig the count against Democrats.Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, who decides what the government asks in its authoritative decennial count, announced Monday that the Census Bureau will ask respondents to report their citizenship status on the form that goes out to all U.S. households.The census is supposed to take an accurate picture of the entire country, not just of residents born or naturalized here.center_img But minors, green-card holders and other nonvoters still count.Political representation has been apportioned according to this principle since the country’s founding.If the count is off in the urban centers where immigrants congregate, blue states will lose representation and rural areas will gain political clout even more disproportionate to the number of people who actually live in them.The state of California immediately announced a lawsuit challenging Ross’ decision.But Congress also could act.Lawmakers should prevent the Trump administration from fouling the census.More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristslast_img read more

Australia to deploy armed forces in coronavirus compliance battle

first_imgAustralia has already closed its borders to everyone but Australian citizens or residents returning home. Those returnees will now be detained in a hotel for two weeks, rather than trusted to go home and self-isolate.The Australian Defense Force (ADF) will be sent out to check recent returnees are complying with the previous order to self-isolate at their home for the same period of time, a rare step in a country where the military is not often seen on the streets.”The ADF will be there to put boots on the ground,” Morrison said.The rate of infections across Australia remains much slower than in many other countries, but officials are concerned that the number of cases has accelerated over the past week, particularly in the most populated states of New South Wales (NSW) and Victoria. There have been 13 deaths nationally. Australia is introducing enforced quarantine by midnight on Saturday for citizens returning home from overseas and will deploy the armed forces to ensure people already subjected to self-isolation measures are complying.Prime Minister Scott Morrison said on Friday that returning Australians accounted for around two thirds of the country’s more than 3,000 coronavirus cases, making it the “biggest issue” to be addressed in the country’s fight against the pandemic.”As time has gone on, the risk of those who are returning from other parts of the world actually increases,” Morrison said in a televised briefing. Despite the relatively low numbers, there has been frustration and anger over contradictory guidance from the federal government, state legislators and health officials in recent days over the necessary level of social distancing.At the same media conference where Morrison announced returning Australians as the No. 1 issue to tackle, Australia’s chief medical officer Brendan Murphy said the priority from a health perspective was preventing any potential spike in local transmissions.”We’re not kidding ourselves – if community transmission becomes significant, that is the real serious concern,” Murphy said. “That’s why these social distancing measures are just so important.”That has been a particularly thorny issue for Morrison’s government, which has said that schools should remain open and has so far backed away from the more sweeping lockdowns on public movement seen in Europe.The leaders of NSW and Victoria state have both said they are ready to push ahead with tighter curbs when – rather than if – they become necessary.”We will get to a point where we need to do more,” Victoria Premier Daniel Andrews said after Morrison spoke.Andrews said measures like the enforced quarantine for returning travellers were a “big step to take away someone’s liberty … but this is life and death. There is too much at stake to do otherwise.”Cruise ship concerns Cruise ships have become a flashpoint in Australia after almost 200 of 2,700 passengers who were allowed to disembark from Carnival Corp’s Ruby Princess in Sydney a week ago later tested positive for COVID-19.Murphy noted on Friday that case numbers had “not been helped by a recent cruise ship”. The blunder sparked widespread anger, a blame game between state and federal authorities, and tighter scrutiny of cruise ships still in Australian waters.One liner off the west coast, the German-owned MV Artania, was permitted to dock on Friday morning after a medical emergency on board. Seven passengers have tested positive for COVID-19, with one now in hospital in a critical condition.Western Australia state Premier Mark McGowan said arrangements were being made for around 800 remaining passengers to be transferred to waiting planes for charter flights to Germany, the home country of the bulk of the tourists.Australian passengers on board a second cruise ship in Western Australian waters, the Vasco da Gama, will be quarantined on the former prison island turned tourist destination of Rottnest island from Monday. Other passengers will be flown home. center_img Topics :last_img read more

Watch: Derek Carr’s toddler passes to Antonio Brown’s son for Raiders touchdown

first_imgYounger and better. That’s been the clarion call for Raiders’ player personnel operatives ever since George Blanda retired his truss.This might be overdoing it.Recently, and apparently during a lull in the action at the Raiders’ training camp facility in Napa, Deker Carr, 3, son of Raiders starting quarterback Derek Carr, and Ali Brown, 4, son of wide receiver Antonio Brown, got together for some individual drills. What happened next was magic.First, a quick reminder from big AB to li’l AB: …last_img

ESPN Announces This Year’s Theme Song For The College Football Season

first_imgESPN PlayoffESPN PlayoffIf you’re constantly tuned in to ESPN during pigskin season, you’ll likely see the network’s college football promo commercials dozens, if not hundreds of times. The Worldwide Leader, much to the dismay of many, uses the same song for every bit. By the end of the year, you’ll know every word.So which song will you know every word to this year? According to Chris Fowler, who used to host College GameDay before giving up the job to Rece Davis last year, this year’s song will be “Collider” by the X Ambassadors and Tom Morello. The X Ambassadors are an alternative rock band from Ithaca, New York. Morello, of course, was the guitarist for Rage Against the Machine.Here’s the video for the song, if you’re so inclined. It was released on August 1st.As a huge Tom Morello/Rage Against the Machine fan, this makes me happy: new ESPN CFB anthem w/X Ambassadors https://t.co/0ipVtmRM4y— Chris Fowler (@cbfowler) August 3, 2016Last year, the tune was “History” by Lauren Alaina. In 2014, it was “Centuries” by Fall Out Boy.The X Ambassadors were formed in 2009 and released their first full-length album in 2015. The band is comprised of four members – Sam Harris, Casey Harris, Noah Feldshuh and Adam Levin.ESPN will kick off its college football coverage in 2016 in Sydney, Australia. Hawaii and California are set to meet at ANZ Stadium on Friday, August 26. The Rainbow Warriors and Golden Bears will meet a week before all other teams.College football’s opening weekend will feature a number of important games, so expect to see a number of promos. In the first few days of the season, we’ll get to see Kansas State vs. Stanford, Oklahoma vs. Houston, UCLA vs. Texas A&M, LSU vs. Wisconsin, Alabama vs. USC, Florida State vs. Ole Miss, Texas vs. Notre Dame and Auburn vs. Clemson.last_img read more

Beside The Points For Thursday Oct 12 2017

NFL Oh, and don’t forgetRandom audience guy with minimal training wins title after combatant pulls out of MMA fight, the jabroni dream All newsletters See more MLB predictions See more NFL predictions We’re launching a sports newsletter. 🏆  Join the squad. Subscribe Things That Caught My EyeWorst defeat everThe biggest sports story of the week is by far the collapse of the U.S. Men’s National Team in its World Cup qualifier match against Trinidad and Tobago. Going into the match — the U.S. needed a win or tie to automatically qualify — the U.S. had a 93 percent chance of making the World Cup. But they lost 2-1 to a team playing for nothing but pride, with one of those goals being scored by a U.S. defender on his own net. Then both Panama and Honduras won their games, eliminating the U.S. and propelling Panama to the cup. Going back to 1885, the men have never lost a World Cup match in any stage of the tournament or qualfying in which they were so favored to win. [FiveThirtyEight]Yeah that 2-1 loss has hundreds of millions of dollars worth of consequencesBetween the $425 million television broadcast deal and that wage discrimination lawsuit U.S. soccer will have a harder time contesting and that other antitrust lawsuit they might have an easier time contesting and the potential gutting of the youth soccer movement in America and the sponsorship revenue for Major League Soccer in potential peril, yeah it would have been really cool for a whole bunch of people had the U.S. national team not lost that game. [The Washington Post]Kansas City hustleWith five consecutive wins, the Elo rating of the Kansas City Chiefs is at the highest level since their win over the Vikings in Super Bowl IV. Only eight weeks in the team’s history have them looking better than they do now, all of them in that Super Bowl season. [FiveThirtyEight]It’s only a lost season if you fail to tankAccording to ESPN’s Football Power Index, the Browns have a 49 percent chance of finishing dead last and getting the top pick in the 2018 NFL Draft, the 49ers have a 32.2 percent chance, the Bears have a 9.3 percent chance, the Colts have a 3.3. percent chance and the Giants have a 3.6 percent chance. [ESPN]Congrats, equivalent of three fourths of Staten IslandIceland qualified for the World Cup — you remember, that thing America screwed up and failed to make — and is now the smallest nation to ever do so with its population of 334,000. [Bleacher Report]Not gonna lie, did not see this comingThe net favorability of the NFL among Trump voters according to a Morning Consult poll is -24 points. The net favorability among Clinton voters is +38 points. Hop in a time machine and go tell yourself that little nugget a year ago and watch an innocent mind explode. [The New York Times]Make sure to try your hand at our fun NFL can you beat the FiveThirtyEight predictions? game!Big Number55.232U.S. gymnast Morgan Hurd took the gold medal in Montreal at the 2017 World All-Around Championship, scoring a 55.232. Canada’s Ellie Black took the silver medal and Russia’s Elena Eremina took bronze. Make a little note of that in your “SMART SMALL TALK TO MENTION DURING OLYMPICS TO SOUND LIKE YOU FOLLOW SPORTS BESIDES DIVING” folder that I assume all other people have as well as me. [Flo Gymnastics]Leaks from Slack: Oh God no, not like this editiongfoster:[8:20 PM] Oh boy. U.S. Losing to Trinidad[8:37 PM] Ahhhhhh 2-0 Trinidad 😱[8:39] At least Costa Rica scoredtchow:[8:52 PM] Meanwhile..Argentina up 2-1meghan:[8:53 PM] So wait — is the US screwed again?tchow:[8:54 PM] No they’re still in at the moment. If results holdmeghan:[8:54 PM] Thanks, Tonywalt:[9:06 PM] oh my godtchow:[9:07 PM] Pulisic. American god[9:32 PM] Honduras up 3-2gfoster:[9:37 PM] Is panama scores and this holds, they are out[9:39] If all these results hold, they play a playoff with Australia…which ain’t good[9:47 PM] Panama scored[9:47] They are going to be eliminatedneil:[9:49 PM] Oh man — so they needed either Panama or Honduras to lose, and they both won?gfoster:[9:49 PM] This really sucks.neil:[9:49 PM] lol[9:50] Sorry, I mean 🇺🇸😿[9:50] (it’s soccer. /shrug )heynawl-enten:[9:51 PM] joined #sport.[9:51 PM] This is TERRIBLE.[9:51 PM] left #sport.gfoster:[9:52 PM] Terrible for traffic.neil:[9:52 PM] More room for baseball coverage. 😉gfoster:[9:53 PM] Nightmare.walt:[9:54] WHAT[9:54] omgemily:[9:54 PM] (do they still get paid more for not even qualifying than the WNT will for winning it?)Predictions MLB read more

Sandals kicks into Overdrive with Unveiling events for Travel Agents across North

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppUnited States, October 26, 2017 – On the personal invitation of Gordon ‘Butch’ Stewart, Chairman of Sandals Resorts International, over 6,000 travel agents across the United States and Canada are currently being invited to attend a series of ‘Overdrive Unveiling’ events.   The events are designed to showcase not only the Sandals and Beaches brands and their various and upcoming innovations, but also the wider Caribbean destination which is up and running and awaiting visitors.The 21 city high-energy trade-show-styled presentations and dinners will run from September 25 through to December 6.  Stops along the route include Baltimore, Boston, Philadelphia, Atlanta, Houston, Long Island, Toronto and Montreal.   The Unveilings provide an avenue for travel agents to view and gain first-hand information on product updates through direct interactions with senior Sandals and Beaches Resorts executives.The Unveilings also present the opportunity for the agents to engage with Tourist Board representatives from several Caribbean islands.The Sandals Chairman shared that, “One of the main reasons for Sandals’ success these past 36 years, and why we continue to be named the Caribbean’s Leading Hotel Brand year after year, is our commitment to our travel partners.   We have the biggest sales team globally and we are constantly on the road, engaging the trade.   We take the time to actively educate them on our Caribbean destinations, our resorts and our products, thus providing them with the necessary tools to effectively sell to our mutual clients.”The expos are a long standing tradition for Sandals Resorts and feature personalized presentations each year.   Things are ramped into ‘overdrive’ this year however as the company is steadfast in showcasing the Caribbean’s continued readiness to welcome vacationers.    Along with highlighting the much-anticipated opening of its latest resort, Sandals Royal Barbados, the unveilings provide a sneak peak of Sandals’ new wedding inspirations scheduled for roll-out later this year.  Exciting upgrades to its flagship Sandals Montego Bay and the jewel of Jamaica’s southern coast, Sandals South Coast, as well as plans for Saint Lucia were also on display.Gary Sadler, senior vice president of global sales states ‘We recognize that our clients are not sitting and waiting for us, nor are they under our desks.  It is therefore necessary for us to go where they are and the best way for us to get them to help the Caribbean particularly at this time, is for us to promote the Caribbean.   We are aggressive about marketing the Caribbean and our Unveilings are doing just that.”Working alongside the company’s North American sales force at each leg of the tour are more than 30 team members from various departments at Sandals and Beaches resorts across the Caribbean, all dedicated to the Unveilings’ success.Press Release: DPA news Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items:last_img read more

In This Issue A sticky question… Budget negoti

first_imgIn This Issue.*A sticky question… *Budget negotiations stall… *BOJ to announce more stimulus… *Gold and Silver reverse…And, Now, Today’s Pfennig For Your Thoughts!Is all debt bad???Good day. I was met with the above question as I walked through the door last night.  As I came home from work my 14 year old asked me the answer to the question ‘Is all debt bad?’.  My daughter, Lauren, is in the middle of exams and she was upset that she had missed this question on a civics exam.  She occasionally reads the Pfennig, and has listened in on enough of our dinner conversations to realize that much of the world is currently in a debt crisis.  So when she was presented with a true false question regarding debt, she answered True – all debt is bad. From reading your comments about yesterday’s Pfennig, many of you would have given Lauren extra credit, but unfortunately I had to let her know that her answer is technically wrong.  As I explained to Lauren, not all debt is bad.  There are times when a country, company, or individual needs to borrow money.  Debt can be used to fund all sorts of very good projects, and keeps economies rolling through slowdowns.  But debt is meant to eventually be paid off, not accumulated in a never ending cycle. So yes, Lauren missed that question on her civics exam; but in a way I am glad she missed it as I don’t think it is a bad thing that my daughter is a bit scared of debt.  I just wish some of our leaders in Washington would match my daughter’s concern over debt accumulation. But enough of my dinner table economics lecture, let’s get to the currency markets.It was a ‘risk off’ day in the currency markets, but the moves were dampened by the holiday thinned trading desks.  The yen finally reversed its recent sell off, and the dollar also climbed a bit as US lawmakers moved further apart on a budget deal.  President Obama told business leaders that budget talks have regressed and accused Republicans of wasting a lot of time with political posturing (perhaps a bit of the pot calling the kettle black). Today we have an absolute plethora of data which will be released here in the US.  We start off the morning with GDP projections for the 3rd quarter which are expected to show the US economy grew just under 3% compared to previous estimates of 2.7% growth.  It is Thursday, so we will also get the weekly jobs numbers which are projected to show another 360k workers filed for jobless claims last week.  Continuing claims are predicted to have increased to 3200k in another indication the labor market will be very slow to recover.  This employment data will be followed up with existing home sales and leading indicators.  Yesterday’s data showed a drop in Housing starts (down 3% MOM) but an increase in building permits (3.6%MOM).  Definitely some conflicting data, so the existing home sales may help give investors a better picture of the housing recovery.  Finally, the leading indicators are expected to show a decrease of .2% during November following an increase of the same amount in the previous month.The yen had dropped for three straight days as investors worried the new Prime Minister would successfully push for more aggressive rounds of stimulus.  The BOJ ends their two day meeting today, and are expected to announce additional stimulus moves. Adding to the worries regarding the yen was a Japanese government report released yesterday which showed the trade deficit widened in November. Traditionally Japan has run a trade surplus, and the deficits have caused investors to re evaluate their demand expectations for the yen.  A country which runs a trade surplus creates demand for their currency, while trade deficits will typically drive the demand for (and value of) a currency lower. The yen has bounced back a bit this morning as some investors apparently believe the three day selloff was overdone.The euro continued to climb through most of the morning yesterday, moving just above $1.33 for a short period.  But the renewed worries out of Washington caused it to give back some of these gains and it is now holding in the $1.32 handle.  I had a reader scold me for not writing more on the Swiss Franc and its recent rise.  I haven’t mentioned the Swiss franc simply because of its peg to the Euro.  So as the euro moves, so will the Swiss franc.  The 3.44% increase in the euro over the past month has been matched with a 3.36% increase in the Swiss franc vs. the US$.  As long as the Swiss National Bank defends the peg to the euro, there is really no need to talk about the Swiss as it is tied to the euro.  Now it will certainly be interesting if/when the peg is relaxed, and you can bet Chuck or I will inform all of you when we start hearing any indications of that.  Until then, readers can simply watch the euro.Several readers asked me to comment on the big drop in gold prices over the past couple of days.  Many of you pointed me toward various manipulation theories, but I think there are two possible explanations for the recent drop in prices.  First, there was improved confidence that a compromise would be reached between the two parties over the fiscal cliff.  As we approached the year end, demand for gold climbed as investors looked for an asset they could hide in if/when our leaders in D.C. took us over the cliff.  A second possible explanation is year-end selling due to the probable increase in tax rates.  Silver has had a nice 12 percent rise this year, and gold is up 6.72% so investors could just be taking these gains off the table before 2013.  By the way, this will be the 12th consecutive year of gains in the price of gold. No matter what caused the selloff, both metals rebounded yesterday as concerns over the fiscal cliff agreement returned.  Negotiations in Washington have deteriorated, so my first theory on what caused the recent sell-off has been flipped and gold is now climbing again.  Most of the gold refineries are also going into a end of year / holiday shutdown, so additional supply will be limited over the next couple of weeks.On a longer term basis, I am confident that demand for precious metals will be increasing.  The fiscal problems facing many of the Western nations will shake global investor confidence in ‘fiat’ currencies.  And my thoughts on the ‘rise of the Chinese consumer’ also support higher metals prices.  As consumers in both China and India see even a slight increase in disposable income, a percentage of that income will likely be invested into the precious metals markets.  Gold and Silver are much more accepted as forms of wealth storage in the Asian cultures, so any increase in disposable incomes should lead toward an increase in demand.  Just another reason I think precious metals should be a part of every investors diversified portfolio.And then there was this. The Fed’s holding of interest rates at record low levels have had a very different impact on two separate classes of investors.  A story I spotted on Bloomberg this morning pointed out the dramatic divergence between savers and professional investors.  The story, written by Bob Ivry starts out with this line “Deepak Narula’s mortgage-bond fund is up 39 percent this year.  George Sanchez’s monthly annuity payout is down 41 percent.”  Ivry goes on to explain some of the unintended consequences of the FOMC’s interest rate policies. “The near-zero interest rate the Federal Reserve charges financial firms, as well as securities purchases that will balloon the central bank’s balance sheet to almost $4 trillion next year, have made it easier for Narula’s $1.6 billion fund to thrive and more difficult for Sanchez, a former college library director, to enjoy retirement.”The story includes an excellent quote by Nobel Prize-winning Columbia University economist Joseph E. Stiglitz: “Monetary policy has been indirectly, surreptitiously helping the top and hurting the bottom.”  Stiglitz blames the Fed policies for starving money-savers of income and boosting certain asset prices, widening the gap between the rich and the rest of the country.  Bob Ivry has written some excellent pieces on the Fed, and I always enjoy reading his take on things. To recap. Debt is not always bad, but the constant accumulation of debt is! Budget negotiations hit a snag, sending investors back toward safe havens.  Today will be a big day for data here in the US markets, but holiday thinned trading desks should keep volatility down. The BOJ is expected to announce more stimulus, but the yen has already been adjusted for the expected increase in supply. Gold reversed its recent sell off, and started moving back up on worries on the budget negotiations. And the FOMC’s zero rate policies have caused a divergence in returns for savers vs. professionals.Currencies today 12/20/12. American Style: A$ $1.0493, kiwi .8343, C$ $1.0113, euro 1.3255, sterling 1.6262, Swiss $1.0974. European Style: rand 8.5159, krone 5.5498, SEK 6.5114, forint 216.0, zloty 3.0708, koruna 19.0335, RUB 30.6835, JPY 84.10, SGD 1.2184, HKD 7.7501, INR 54.8544, China 6.2306, pesos 12.7715, BRL 2.0619, Dollar Index 79.163, Oil $89.88, 10-year 1.78%, Silver $31.22, Gold $1,670.62, and Platinum $1591.24.That’s it for today. Congratulations to Antione Lawrence as his lovely wife Brooke gave birth to a beautiful baby girl yesterday.  It is the couple’s first child, and the first of three babies on their way for the WorldMarkets desk (Both Mikes, Harrell and Meyer, are also expecting).  We anxiously awaited the news yesterday morning after Antione let us know he and Brooke were headed into the hospital.  Both baby and mom are doing fine, and I’m sure proud papa Antione is beaming!  Sounds like we could see our first snow of the year, it is currently raining but the temps are supposed to drop and the rain should turn to snow later today.  I will wrap up today’s Pfennig on that great news.  I hope everyone has a great day, and thanks for reading the Pfennig!Chris Gaffney, CFA Vice President EverBank World Markets 1-800-926-4922 1-314-647-3837last_img read more