Vital intervention needed to address food poverty

first_imgAdvertisement Linkedin More than 1,000 children looked for help from Limerick homeless agency WhatsApp THERE are more than 70 families homeless in Limerick with the number continuing to rise, according to voluntary agency Novas.And they also maintain that many more are hidden homeless or at risk, with many of these families living in emergency B&B accommodation with no cooking facilities.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Novas, who are the largest provider of homeless services in the Mid-West, point out that the traumas of being homeless are multi-faceted and enduring. Head of Policy and Communications with the voluntary service provider, Una Burns explained that for those living in commercial B&Bs, access to basic nutritious food is a challenge.“Families often rely on takeaway food for weeks and months on end. It is eaten on laps, sitting on beds, in one room. Parents report that their children are putting on weight, they lack concentration in school and their physical wellbeing is being compromised.“Due to the expensive nature of this food provision, families are finding it impossible to save for the expense of moving to a long-term home, thus protracting the length of time they are homeless,” Ms Burns told the Limerick Post.However, there is an alternative, she insists.Novas has arranged for families to have a nutritious and hearty meal in a community café in Our Lady of Lourdes each evening. A family has the opportunity to eat good food, sitting around a table together. It allows a family a break away from one room, in which they play out their lives. It is one less thing to worry about.Ms Burns describes the initiative as a “vital intervention” to support families who are experiencing homelessness.“It helps to bring some normality to an extraordinarily difficult time for families and affords families the opportunity to save in preparation of a move to more permanent accommodation, a home of their own. Some 80 per cent of families are homeless due to economic factors. This is one burden we can help with. However, we need the support of the public to do this,”An evening meal in the community café costs €4 per child and €4.50 per adult. Text NOVAS to 50300 to donate €4. Alternatively, you can log onto www.novas.ie/donate/ to donate more. You can also set up a monthly direct debit to support Novas on an ongoing basis. A monthly direct debit of €28 will provide a hearty meal for a child for a week. NewsHousingVital intervention needed to address food povertyBy Alan Jacques – May 29, 2018 1176 Homeless children living in hotels have difficulty chewing and swallowing Getting a second chance at life Print Facebookcenter_img Previous article2 Limerick primary schools amongst finalists for Eco Ranger awardsNext articleWinners of HOMS Solicitors Company Challenge presented with their trophies Alan Jacqueshttp://www.limerickpost.ie RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR 163 children homeless in Limerick and Clare as Christmas approaches Twitter Politicians should work together to end homeless crisis Email Limerick’s Will O’Donoghue to take part in Novas Christmas Sleep-Out TAGSfamilyhomelesshomelessnessNovasNovas Initiativesnutrition last_img read more

Residential Life, Student Affairs discuss new residential life policies at special senate meeting

first_imgMarie Fazio | The Observer Associate vice president of residential life Heather Rakoczy Russell and vice president for Student Affairs Erin Hoffmann Harding attend a special senate meeting Tuesday evening to address new residential life policies.“We didn’t call this policy the senior exclusion policy. We called this policy differentiating on and off-campus experience,” Rakoczy Russell said. “What that means is what things off-campus will have access to and the ways that they will build community will look different than how on-campus students will.”Hoffmann Harding said the journey to the April 11 announcement began over four years ago, when Flaherty and Dunne Halls were opened to address the issue of overcrowding on campus. “We had seen a significant increase in proportion of seniors living off-campus,” Hoffmann Harding said. “We wanted to understand how important it was for all of us to have upperclassmen leadership in those communities. As wonderful as I hope all of your hall staff are, it’s equally valuable to have upperclassmen down the hall.”To determine the policies, officials used input from student focus groups and discussions and demographic analysis to determine trends in movement off-campus and possible factors that would entice students to say. Residential life systems at Vanderbilt University and University of Dayton were used as benchmarks, she said.“We believe deeply that this residential experience matters — it’s part of the undergraduate education,” Hoffmann Harding said. “We think it’s something that makes us different, we hope it’s something that makes us special. We hope ultimately that it’s a place where each student feels as if they belong.” This research led to the Sept. 2017 announcement of the six-semester residency requirement, which was announced prior to the application process of that year. A similar negative reaction to a six semester requirement overshadowed the announcement that several incentives would be announced as the first class affected by the residency requirement, the class of 2022, became upperclassmen. Rakoczy Russell said the team did not initially plan to announce the on and off-campus differentiation policies April 11, but were urged to include it in the announcement by rectors and members of residential communities. “We decided to tack on an extra item to the April 11 announcement, mainly so that first-year students will know that by the time they are seniors there will be a difference between the on and off-campus experience,” Rakoczy Russell said. “What that difference will be will be decided in conversation with students over the course of the next academic year with the idea that by this time next year, we can say fully fleshed out what that looks like.”Details are still undecided regarding senior fellow positions and block meal plans, although Rakoczy Russell expects to have official practices implemented by the fall of 2021.Rakoczy Russell said students have frequently mentioned the lack of consistency between residence halls — specifically across gender lines — in focus groups. To investigate this issue, 100% of rectors participated in an anonymous survey regarding enforcement of the policy.“Depending on the hall, depending on the rector, the size of the community, the perceived priorities or needs of that community, there were different practices relative to each hall, some of it divided on gender norms,” Rakoczy Russell said. “What I heard from students over time was that there was great dissatisfaction not knowing what they could count on as a hallmark of a residential community.”Rakoczy Russell said the survey found practices regarding off-campus senior differed between halls. This is a recent development, she said — about 10 years ago, some residence halls began allowing students to compete in interhall sports teams, particularly football, which eventually spread to other practices including dances. She noted future plans to send an email every August that details changes in consistency policies for that year. Katherine Fugate, an off-campus junior who plans to stay off-campus next year, said a certain kind of student  — one who lacks the “mainstream Notre Dame identity of being white, Catholic upper-class student who is heterosexual and cisgender” — may not find community in their residence hall. She cited Notre Dame’s commitment to Catholic Social Teaching, specifically preferential option for the poor, as a reason to allow those who would like to move off to do so without repercussions. “Any conversations about inclusion also include conversations about who’s excluded from those activities,” Fugate said. Hoffmann Harding said although individual student needs differ, student discussion groups revealed students of color and students receiving significant aid were more likely to stay on campus. “The single biggest and most significant predictor of whether or not a student moved was actually not receiving financial aid,” Hoffmann Harding said.As a possible solution to those who do not feel at home in their assigned dorms, the interhall transfer process was streamlined. Students are no longer required to speak with both rectors, and an exemption process — which overrides housing decisions — was put in place. Hoffmann Harding expressed a desire to continue the conversation with students during the process of shaping the policy throughout next school year. “As much as we regret that maybe some of our intentions were misunderstood here, I actually think it’s really exciting,” Hoffmann Harding said. “This is a conversation that matters. We know that you care. You care about these communities that you were a part of and you care about the experiences that you had there and that to me is very powerful.”Tags: Housing policy, residential life, Six Semester Policy, Student Affairs, student senate Student senate was joined by associate vice president of residential life Heather Rakoczy Russell and vice president for Student Affairs Erin Hoffmann Harding for a special meeting to address recently announced residential life policies Tuesday night in Duncan Student Center. The policies — which include incentives for on-campus seniors, enhancements for all students and efforts that differentiate on and off-campus experiences — were announced April 11 and met with major pushback from the student body.last_img read more

New Mini Hydraulic Excavator from Caterpillar

first_imgCaterpillar has just launched their new Cat 306 CR Mini Hydraulic Excavator, marking the company’s entry in the 6-ton class offering. According to Caterpillar, the 306 CR mini excavator is built to exceed customer expectations with strong performance, enhanced operator experience and simplified maintenance with extended service intervals.The new mini excavator features heavy-duty main structures, a fuel-efficient engine, load-sensing hydraulics, spacious cab and exclusive Cat Stick Steer system. It shares a similar controls layout and common components with the full line of Cat Next Generation mini excavators to simplify training, offer quick adaptation for operation and lower owning/operating costs.With its long stick option, the 306 CR delivers a maximum dig depth of 162 in (4 110 mm) and 15,821-lb (7 175-kg) maximum operating weight when equipped with the sealed and pressurized cab.Built with a swing boom, this Next Generation mini excavator’s compact radius design provides a low, 58-in (1 475-mm) tail swing with counterweight for working close to obstructions.last_img read more

Bacolod boosts pneumonia, flu protection for elderly

first_imgPersons with disabilities aged 50years old and above also availed of free pneumonia and flu vaccination duringthe activity dubbed “Bakunado si Lolo at Lola, Iwas Pulmonya” with vaccinesprovided by the Department of Health in Western Visayas.(With a report from PNA/PN) Dr. Jovy Vergara, assistant cityhealth officer, said pneumonia ranks second and third in terms of morbidity andmortality, respectively, among those 60 years old and above. In 2010 alone, 57,809 deaths due topneumonia were recorded – making it the top five leading causes of death in thecountry, reports said.  Pneumonia causes inflammation of theair sacs in one or both lungs. It can be caused by a variety of organismsincluding bacteria, viruses and fungi. Symptoms may include breathingdifficulty, coughing, fever, and weakness. BACOLOD City – Around 1,000 seniorcitizens here received vaccination against pneumonia and flu as part of thecity government’s efforts to protect them from respiratory infections. Aside from weakened immune system,elderly patients with pneumonia are more prone to severe complications,hospitalization and death due to pre-existing health conditions and illnessessuch as diabetes, chronic lung disease and kidney or heart conditions, amongothers. The disease could be lethal orlife-threatening for senior citizens, Vergara added during the immunizationactivity at the Bacolod Arts, Youth and Sports Center on Thursday. In the Philippines, pneumoniaaccounted for over 57,000 deaths among Filipinos annually in the past decade,according to authorities. Vergara added most elderly patientsseek treatment only during the last stage of the disease. Vergara said pneumonia is avaccine-preventable disease, noting that the government is putting a premium onvarious programs like free vaccination especially among the elderly.  “Among the elderly, especially thosewith chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pneumonia is more dangerous astheir immune system is weaker,” he said.last_img read more