Making the most of your (next) data breach

first_imgIan Livingston, former CEO of BT Group, memorably stated: “There are two types of CEO, those that know their systems are being hacked – and those that don’t.”That was three years ago. While CEOs are undoubtedly more aware of the risks now, how many have employees who still play fast and loose with customers’ personal data? And how many senior managers have full control over their employees’ practices?Although much may have been invested to protect digital estates, many senior executives are unsure what personal data they retain and where, how well protected it is, who has access to it and – in an age of collaborative commerce, lengthening supply chains, and ecosystem delivery – precisely who is accountable for what.Some still rely on averages (“It won’t happen on my watch”) and apathy (“Everybody loses a little once in awhile”) to get them through any choppy water, should incidents occur and reach the public domain. But if you rely on crisis communications as your main defense (“We are investigating an incident we can’t comment on now; meanwhile the launch of x has delivered stunning figures…”), then there may be trouble ahead.With increasing transparency, tougher penalties, ongoing press interest, and the rise of socially-savvy, digitally-literate citizens and consumers, a casual approach to privacy has to change.Even the best defenses will succumb to attack sometimes. This is as much due to simple human error as it is to the asymmetry of security. The defender needs to protect perfectly on all fronts, while the attacker needs to find just one crack in the armor.Breaches are inevitable, and many customers understand that data loss happens regardless of how well-prepared a business is. How you act during and after a breach – and how you communicate with your members in the hours and days after discovery – is vital.Yes, some members will immediately leave in disgust, no matter what you do. But the vast majority of customers are more likely to leave because they feel your organization does not act with integrity.So how do you reduce the negative impact of any incident and make sure you “don’t waste a crisis,” should one occur?Redirect executive angst to infrastructure attention…If you run the department where the incident arose, you have to expect executives to focus on your operation and to be prepared to endure the heat of micro-management for awhile post-breach. This energy should soon be galvanized to address underlying issues you have probably been aware of for awhile, but which have been in the “vital but not urgent” budget category.Know in advance what to ask for once the immediate crisis is over while decision-makers have intimate awareness of your part of their business. For example, perhaps now is the time to move to the cloud – but have you reviewed the pros and cons from each stakeholder’s perspective?…and fresh opportunityInvestment shouldn’t stop at just fixing. Privacy confidence stems from the certainty that scrutiny brings.While there should be due caution about not rushing into another faux pas, a crisis handled well, and an intimate understanding of what data you hold, should give you new opportunities to engage anew with members. So long as they feel charmed and not persecuted by your renewed familiarity with them.Practice (don’t just document)Most businesses have well-documented if not oft-rehearsed or realistically-simulated emergency response plans. Practicing, not just writing down, your incident response plan builds organizational “muscle memory.” The best data breach is a staged one. One that reawakens people to the real world impacts that could occur if we mishandle the personal information entrusted to us.Institutionalizing the right habits is essential. Think how many people have read your fire policy and how many know what to do because the company has rehearsed a fire drill regularly. Then consider how much more likely a data breach is than a fire. 38SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Nick Rhodes Nick Rhodes specializes in benefit realization and privacy. He has been with BAE Systems Applied Intelligence for 19 years helping clients plan, prioritize and push-through change. He works through the … Web: www.baesystems.com Detailslast_img read more

Frances McIntosh

first_imgFrances McIntosh, 95, of Moores Hill passed away Sunday, August 11, 2019 at Ripley Crossing in Milan.  Frances was born Tuesday, October 9, 1923 in Gray Hawk, Kentucky, the daughter of Henry and Matilda (Smith) Peters.  She married Edward McIntosh March 31, 1939 and he preceded her in death June 24, 1996.  She was a former member of Moores Hill Church of Christ.  She was the former owner/operator of McIntosh Grocery Store in Moores Hill and former member of Moores Hill Legion Auxiliary.  She enjoyed her flowers, gardening, bowling, bingo and was an avid Cincinnati Reds baseball fan.Frances is survived by sons: James (Pat) McIntosh of Decorah, Iowa, Kenneth (Cheryl) McIntosh of Rising Sun and Deron McIntosh of Dillsboro; daughter Sandy Hollitt of Milan; daughter-in-law Connie McIntosh; 11 grandchildren; 18 great grandchildren; 13 great-great grandchildren and sister May Quinn of Louisville, Kentucky.  She was preceded in death by her parents, husband Edward, sons: Jerry and Ron, 1 brother, 1 sister, son-in-law Peter and 1 step-sister.A service celebrating her life will be held 11 AM Thursday, August 15, 2019 at Sibbett-Moore Funeral Home in Moores Hill with Pastor Tom Holt officiating.  Burial will follow in Forest Hill Cemetery.  Family and friends may gather to share and remember her 5 – 7 PM Wednesday, August 14 also at the funeral home.  Memorials may be given in honor of Frances to Moores Hill Life Squad.  Sibbett-Moore Funeral Home entrusted with arrangements, 16717 Manchester Street, Box 156, Moores Hill, IN 47032 (812)744-3280.  You may go to www.sibbettmoore.com to leave an online condolence message for the family.last_img read more

Real Valladolid sign Ben Arfa

first_imgRelatedPosts Rennes want Fikayo Tomori, £25m for Mendy Neymar, Di Maria, Paredes test positive for COVID-19 Neymar reflects on Champions League defeat Real Valladolid have signed former PSG midfielder Hatem Ben Arfa. Ben Arfa terminated his agreement with Rennes and signed for Valladolid on Tuesday to the end of this season. A France international, the midfielder has played 388 official matches and scored 73 goals for Lyon, Olympique Marseille, Newcastle, Hull City, Nice, Paris Saint-Germain and Rennes. Valladolid have also signed Almeria striker Sekou Gassama. Gassama has penned terms to 2024 and will immediately join Fuenlabrada on-loan to the end of the season. He played for Real Valladolid Promesas for the 2014/15 season.Tags: Hatem Ben ArfaPSGReal ValladolidRennesSekou Gassamalast_img read more

Fredrik Elmqvist – Yggdrasil Gaming – A customer first approach that makes iSENSE

first_img Romania’s ONJN adds 20 sites to blacklist August 14, 2020 Related Articles Share Share CT Gaming bolsters Italian profile with The Betting Coach  August 27, 2020 Yggdrasil Gaming CEO Fredrik Elmqvist spoke to SBC News about building its own platform iSENSE, the challenges of local regulation and the thinking behind its slightly obscure company name.Fredrik Elmqvist, YggdrasilSBC: What does it take to take a gaming developer brand from an unknown entity and newcomer in the space to one that’s well known and respected?FE: Innovation, creativity and hard work. We’ve grown extremely quickly because we identified that taking a customer-first approach to slots provision would prove popular with operators.We understand what operators are looking for in their slots and accordingly have developed tools that help them market and promote games to their customers.This customer-centric focus, including our collection of in-game promotional tools BOOST™ and social sharing tool BRAG, has really set us apart from the competition. It is not enough to create great games anymore; operators are demanding a world-class promotional infrastructure alongside the titles. Our long list of industry-firsts has really powered this stratospheric growth.SBC: How integral has the use of the iSENSE 2.0 platform been to Yggdrasil’s growth?FE: Very early in the Yggdrasil journey, we decided to build our own platform that would smooth integrations and give us the flexibility to innovate. At the time, some considered this a risky move; most games developers didn’t bother with their own platform, and most were still developing games in Flash.We broke from the mould and were among the first to commit wholeheartedly to HTML5. We could only make that decision because of the deep, strategic understanding of the slots sector that we possess.Since then we’ve continued to develop our iSENSE platform. The most recent iteration, iSENSE 2.0+, features a new, minimalistic UI for both mobile and desktop and facilitates in-game deposits, allowing players to go to the deposit screen with a single click without leaving the game client. We will continue to innovate around iSENSE 2.0 as it is central to the Yggdrasil offering.SBC: Game certification is locally regulated and yet you aim to launch each game across your jurisdictions at the same time – how much of a challenge is this and why do you take this approach?FE: This has become less of a challenge and more a case of business as usual for us. We now have licences in the UK, Malta, Gibraltar and Romania, while also certifying games in Italy. We work with many major operators who are operating across multiple jurisdictions. It can be frustrating for these operators to see a game or feature working well in the UK but not be able to roll it out in Italy, for instance.That’s why we aim for simultaneous launches wherever possible, allowing operators to better coordinate marketing campaigns and budgets. Fortunately, we have one of gaming’s strongest legal and regulatory teams at hand to make this possible. We are particularly excited for the launch of our Jungle Books slot in September, which will go live at the same time in all our jurisdictions.SBC: Can you tell us about the choice of the company name – Yggdrasil? FE: We wanted a name that was easy to pronounce! If you look at the B2B gaming space, most opt for combinations of terms such as ‘Play’, ‘Gaming’ or ‘Net’. We felt we needed something more creative to reflect our approach to games.Yggdrasil is an immense tree in Norse mythology that connects nine worlds, and we felt it nicely reflected our Scandinavian roots. It also gave us the freedom to develop a strong brand and challenge conventions on how B2B gaming firms can be marketed.SBC: You were named Slot Provider of the Year for the second year running at the EGR B2B Awards; how important are such accolades? FE: These awards mean a lot because they are acknowledgment from our own industry that Yggdrasil is doing something different. I’ve long believed that if we as a sector do not constantly strive to push forward online casino, the whole industry will suffer.Obviously, our strong commercial performance is vindication that our model works, but these awards show that we are also fulfilling this mission. It is also fantastic that the hard work of the entire team is rewarded – none of this would be possible without the dedication and creativity of Yggdrasilians.SBC: You recently ran the Yggdrasil Coding Challenge in your Polish office – will you be going forward with more initiatives like this?FE: Recruitment is one of the major challenges both Yggdrasil and the broader gaming industry faces. We have grown quickly in Poland, and have recently opened a new office in Krakow city centre, on the site of an old brewery.To recruit the very best talent, we’ve realised we need to place Yggdrasil at the heart of the city’s technology and art communities. Events such as the Coding Challenge are a way of introducing Yggdrasil to these communities in a fun and creative way. These events have been well received so far, and we’ll certainly continue hosting similar functions. TVBET passes GLI test for five live games in Malta and Italy August 25, 2020 Submit StumbleUponlast_img read more