Simon Harris: “Who can do the most? It’s You and it’s…

first_imgPrint Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live Donal Ryan names Limerick Ladies Football team for League opener RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live Twitter Previous articleJohn Cregan: “Our volunteers and their clubs have a great capacity to respond in times of difficulty”Next articleLimerick Post Show | March 27, 2020 Meghann Scully TAGSCoronaviruscovid19Keeping Limerick PostedlimerickLimerick PostSimon Harris Linkedin WhatsAppcenter_img Email WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival Advertisement Facebook LimerickNewsSimon Harris: “Who can do the most? It’s You and it’s your family”By Meghann Scully – March 27, 2020 333 Simon Harris spoke to RTE news2day SIMON Harris has been answering questions for children surrounding the Covid-19 pandemic.In the interview with RTÉ news2day, the Minister, addressed topics such as hand washing, keeping distance and staying at home while answering questions sent in via video from kids across Ireland:Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Billy Lee names strong Limerick side to take on Wicklow in crucial Division 3 clash last_img read more

Police rescue abducted Virginia teen girl; 34-year-old man taken into custody

first_imgFBI(RICHMOND, Va.) — A 14-year-old girl has been found safe Wednesday night almost 10 days after she went missing along with a 34-year-old man in Virginia.Isabel Shae Hicks had last been seen on Oct. 21 at her home in Bumpass, Virginia, about 40 miles north of Richmond, police said.She “appeared unharmed,” according to authorities.Police had previously said she was believed to be traveling with Bruce Lynch, who was taken into police custody when Hicks was found late Wednesday. The Louisa County Sheriff’s Office said a vehicle the two were in was stopped in Caroline County, north of Richmond, “after a pursuit.”He was spotted by an eyewitness with the teen in Hanover County on Monday and police previously said they feared the eighth-grader could be in extreme danger.Police said Lynch had altered his appearance, including shaving his beard and wearing new clothing, when he was seen with Hicks on Monday.Authorities previously said that Lynch was known to the teen, but declined to discuss their relationship.Hicks was located safe and an Amber Alert issued last week has been canceled, Virginia State Police said. Investigators did not provide details about where she was found, but they said they would offer offer more details as soon as possible.“Miss Hicks has been safely located and Lynch taken into custody,” Virginia State Police said in a statement. “The Louisa County Sheriff’s Office will provide an update shortly … please be patient, as they’re still in the midst of the investigation and arrest.”On Monday, investigators said there was no evidence to suggest that the teen had been taken forcefully. Copyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

06 Pick a peck of pickles

first_imgBy Dan RahnUniversity of GeorgiaCountless gardeners have planted cucumbers with one thought in mind: pickles. Volume XXXIINumber 1Page 6 Cucumbers are easy to grow, said George Boyhan, a Cooperative Extension horticulturist with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.”But they do require some space to spread out,” he said.A number of diseases and insects attack cucumbers, he said, but they’re still fairly easy to grow from transplants or seeds. They’re easier to grow in the spring and early summer. In the fall, insects can be troublesome.Males outnumberedIn packets of cucumber seeds, Boyhan said, 90 percent of the seeds may be brightly colored and 10 percent plain. The bright color indicates a seed treatment and a special type that produces only female flowers and yields more fruit. The untreated seeds produce female and male flowers, providing a pollen source.Plant the seeds an inch and a half deep, usually between April 1 and May 15, leaving 3 to 4 feet between rows and almost as much between plants, he said. Cucumbers need about 60 days to mature.Garden cucumber varieties come in two main types. If you want to eat them fresh, by themselves or in salads, grow a slicing type.”They have dark green rinds with tender, mild flesh,” Boyhan said. “Pick them when they’re about 6 inches long.” If they get much bigger, the seeds will get too hard to eat.The pickling kindIt’s the other type that people have used in pickling worldwide for hundreds and probably thousands of years. “When you think of pickles,” Boyhan said, “you’re thinking of pickled cucumbers.”This type, he said, will turn lighter green or yellowish as it matures. With a more bitter taste, it’s not as good for eating fresh. But its thin skin and spines help it absorb the vinegar solution used in pickling.As with the slicing type, he said, pick these cucumbers when they’re immature, before the seeds begin to harden. Once you’ve picked them, it’s time to pickle them.What began in ancient times as a fermentation process is now most often a fresh-pack or quick pickling process, says Elizabeth Andress, a UGA Extension food safety specialist and director of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Center for Home Food Preservation.”Quick pickling is by far the most popular process,” Andress said. “Fermenting limits you to the dill types. But quick pickling allows many more choices of flavors.”With the vinegar brine of the quick pickling process, sugar and many spices can be added to make cucumbers sour, sweet, hot or mild with an almost endless array of flavors.Be carefulThere’s no shortage of recipes out there, but that makes Andress nervous.”If you don’t have enough acid in the pickles, there’s a danger of botulism,” she said. “Always use a recipe from a reliable source, and never substitute any ingredient that could alter the ratio between the amount of acid and the other ingredients.”Even if you’ve never pickled anything before, making pickles of your cucumbers is still an easy option, Andress said. If you can read a recipe, you can do it.”The easiest thing to learn is the quick-pickling process,” she said. “If you want to store the pickles at room temperature, you’ll have to learn at least boiling-water canning, too. You’ll need some jars and lids, and a canner. But it’s not hard.”A number of recipes and other instructions are on the Web at www.homefoodpreservation.com. Another great resource is the new edition of the UGA Extension book, “So Easy to Preserve” and a separate “So Easy to Preserve” DVD.The books are $18 and the DVDs $39.95, shipping included. You can get order forms for either at www.uga.edu/setp. Or contact the county UGA Extension office at 1-800-ASK-UGA1.(Dan Rahn is a news editor with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)last_img read more