J.B. Wendelken has morphed into A’s “fireman” now healthy from Tommy John

first_imgBALTIMORE — A fireman puts himself at risk in dangerous situations in with the goal of keeping everyone involved safe. A’s pitcher J.B. Wendelken is not going through burning buildings, but in a baseball way, he’s quickly emerging as the team’s fireman.Wendelken has consistently found himself entering games in tough spots early in the 2019 season. The most recent situation came Sunday in Houston when he came on in relief of Mike Fiers with the bases loaded and two outs in the second inning. …last_img

Sensing the World Requires Intelligent Design

first_imgHow do our bodies make sense of the external world?  Through our senses, of course; at least they are the entry points of data into the mind.  Behind those senses are remarkable mechanisms that we use but do not actively operate.  The design in their automatic operations is slowly being revealed with better observing techniques.Sensing sound with motors:  “From grinding heavy metal to soothing ocean waves, the sounds we hear are all perceptible thanks to the vibrations felt by tiny molecular motors in the hair cells of the inner ear,” began an article on PhysOrg.    A single mutation – one amino acid change – in a molecular motor protein called myo1c is enough to disrupt the function of the myosin motor in the hair cell and cause hearing loss.  The mutation causes a reduced sensitivity, perhaps due to making it spend less time attached to actin filaments.  The amino acid is “highly conserved” (unevolved) throughout the superfamily of myosin motors, the article said.Sensing light with circuits:  A novel microscope technique has allowed scientists at Max Planck Institute to decode the eye’s complex circuitry, Science Daily reported.  “The properties of optical stimuli need to be conveyed from the eye to the brain,” the 03/31/2008).    One example of pre-processing accomplished by ganglion cells is responding to light moving in a particular direction.  “This direction selectivity is generated by inhibitory interneurons that influence the activity of the ganglion cells through their synapses.”    Just as with man-made network protocols, the scientists “discovered that the distribution of the synapses between ganglion cells and interneurons follows highly specific rules.”  These ganglion cells intercept and process the visual information before it is received by the brain.  The article described various rules the network of cells follow in activating or inhibiting visual information.Sensing time with clocks:  All living things follow “circadian rhythms,” biological responses to changes in time of day, month, and year.  As in other mammals, the human master clock is located in the brain – specifically, in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), a group of nerve cells in the hypothalamus near the visual cortex.  In response to its data inputs, the SCN can direct the brain to produce more or less melatonin, a hormone that induces sleep.    Live Science described how the SCN works.  There are internal inputs, like genes and proteins produced in the body, and external inputs from the senses.  “Biological clocks aren’t made of cogs and wheels, but rather groups of interacting molecules in cells throughout the body,” the article said.  One of the proteins is aptly named CLOCK – “an essential component in directing circadian rhythms in humans, fruit flies, mice, fungi and other organisms.”  Another is SIRT1, which senses energy use in cells.  The balance of these factors affects how the SCN directs the body to respond to light and darkness and other factors.    Disruption of the biological clock can lead to a host of problems.  Jet lag is a common example.  Fortunately, clock repair is available for that: “Eventually your body is able to adjust its circadian rhythms to the new environment” by a kind of clock reset.  Other dysfunctions, though, can lead to more serious problems, like “obesity, depression and seasonal affective disorder.”  That’s because “hormone production, hunger, cell regeneration and body temperature” are some of the processes that rely on accurate circadian rhythms.All sensory inputs must be processed by the brain.  Fortunately, the brain, like good computer systems, has redundancy mechanisms that give it “plasticity” – the ability to change as we learn, or as parts become damaged.  Science Daily described how researchers at the University of Michigan Medical School are testing mice to see how “the plasticity of the brain allowed mice to restore critical functions related to learning and memory after the scientists suppressed the animals’ ability to make certain new brain cells.”    Fault-tolerant artificial networks, like the power grid and the internet, provide for alternate routes when hubs become unavailable.  Similarly, we have “mechanisms by which the brain compensates for disruptions and reroutes neural functioning,” the article said.  Part of this is recovering from loss of the ability to make new brain cells by giving existing cells more activity and longer life spans.    “It’s amazing how the brain is capable of reorganizing itself in this manner,” Geoffrey Murphy, an associate professor of molecular and integrative physiology at the medical school said.  “Right now, we’re still figuring out exactly how the brain accomplishes all this at the molecular level, but it’s sort of comforting to know that our brains are keeping track of all of this for us.”It makes sense that readers will sense the wonder of the senses a little more after reading these sensible articles, free as they were of evolutionary nonsense.(Visited 8 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Plenty to discuss with the weather

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest After a record warm December, colder weather returned to Ohio and surrounding areas for January with temperatures in January running just below normal.The headlines surround a strong El Nino in the Pacific Ocean. This looks to be the strongest on near-term record. Most of the data suggests this El Nino is similar to the winters of 1957/58, 1982/83 and 1991/92 and like but with some differences to the 1997/98 winter. El Nino is only one of many things affecting the weather pattern but it has its strongest influence on our weather from January into March.The big challenge for the upcoming planting and growing season is the rapid decline in El Nino (warming of the central and eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean) toward a possible La Nina (cooling). This rapid change could result in reduced forecast skill once it gets going this spring and summer.Short-term into first half of February…We expect a pattern change toward warmer and slightly wetter conditions into the first half of February. This will likely result in rain events versus snow events though some minor snows are possible.Second half of February into March…A warmer and drier than normal pattern is forecast across the area. There is some risk of normal precipitation though.Spring…There is uncertainty in spring with transition away from El Nino. Most indications are for a bit warmer and drier than normal. If that transition does not happen as fast away from El Nino it could turn to a slightly wetter and cooler pattern so confidence is low past March. We should know more about this in the next two to four weeks.You can keep up on all of this at the NOAA/NWS/Ohio River Forecast Center Seasonal Briefing Page at: http://w2.weather.gov/ohrfc/SeasonalBriefinglast_img read more

Australian Open to have 10-point tiebreakers in deciding set

first_imgWimbledon announced in October it will next year have a standard first-to-seven-points tiebreaker when the deciding set reaches 12-12.The U.S. Open was the first Grand Slam tournament to introduce final-set tiebreakers, with a first-to-seven-points game at 6-6.The French Open is the only remaining Grand Sam still decided by a long deciding set by advantage.The Australian Open begins on Jan. 14. FILE – In this Jan. 28, 2018, file photo, Croatia’s Marin Cilic wipes sweat from his face as he plays Switzerland’s Roger Federer during the men’s singles final at the Australian Open tennis championships, in Melbourne, Australia. The Australian Open in January will play a 10-point tiebreaker in deciding sets, joining Wimbledon and the U.S. Open in using tiebreakers to avoid long matches. Temperatures often soar to 37 degrees Celsius (100 F) and beyond during the tournament. (AP Photo/Andy Brownbill, File)MELBOURNE, Australia — The Australian Open in January will play a 10-point tiebreaker in deciding sets, joining Wimbledon and the U.S. Open in using tiebreakers to avoid long matches.The tournament said on Friday the decision, reported widely a month ago but denied by Australian Open officials, came after consultation with current and former players and tennis officials. Temperatures often soar to 37 degrees (around 100 F) and beyond during the tournament.ADVERTISEMENT ADVERTISEMENT PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss BREAKING: Corrections officer shot dead in front of Bilibid Is Luis Manzano planning to propose to Jessy Mendiola? Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting SEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completion LOOK: Joyce Pring goes public with engagement to Juancho Triviño TS Kammuri to enter PAR possibly a day after SEA Games opening Hotel management clarifies SEAG footballers’ kikiam breakfast issue Australian Open tournament director Craig Tiley says “we asked the players — both past and present, commentators, agents and TV analysts — whether they wanted to play an advantage final set or not, and went from there.“We went with a 10-point tiebreak at six-games-all in the final set to ensure the fans still get a special finale to these often epic contests, with the longer tiebreak still then allowing for that one final twist or change of momentum in the contest. This longer tiebreak also can lessen some of the serving dominance that can prevail in the shorter tiebreak.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chiefIn the men’s singles draw, the first four sets will feature a seven-point tiebreaker at 6-6, with the final set going to a 10-point tiebreaker at 6-6.In women’s singles play and men’s and women’s doubles and mixed doubles, the deciding set of three sets will be played with a 10-point tiebreaker at 6-6. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. LATEST STORIES Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Rockets’ Chris Paul out at least 2 weeks with hamstring injury MOST READ SEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completion View commentslast_img read more

Seventh North Atlantic right whale found dead in Gulf of St Lawrence

first_imgHALIFAX – More research is needed in the Gulf of St. Lawrence to determine if it has become an emerging habitat for endangered North Atlantic right whales, experts said Friday after the badly decomposed remains of a seventh whale were found floating in roughly the same area as six others.The overturned male was seen bobbing on the surface of the water north of the Magdalen Islands late Wednesday, but it was not yet clear what may have caused this latest death.It follows the deaths of two female and four male North Atlantic right whales found last month.Tonya Wimmer of the Marine Animal Response Society said scientists need to intensify efforts to find out if the lumbering giants are making the Gulf one of their primary feeding grounds in a shift away from their traditional habitats in the Bay of Fundy and Roseway Basin.“All of that together is saying there needs to be a very strong focus on the Gulf to really look at what’s going on and potentially try to figure out where they are and then what can be done to protect them,” she said.“It’s a really important animal to look at in the realm of this larger picture of incidents that have been happening in that southern Gulf of St. Lawrence area.”Wimmer is hoping Fisheries officials will arrange to do necropsies, or animal autopsies, on the latest dead whale as well as a right whale named Panama that has washed ashore on the Magdalen Islands to determine what killed them.Fisheries spokeswoman Krista Petersen said she didn’t know if a decision had been made about the examinations.Three of the other six North Atlantic right whales were necropsied after being hauled on shore in P.E.I. late last month. Scientists say inspections suggest two suffered blunt trauma injuries consistent with ship strikes — one of the deadliest threats to the animals.The third died from a chronic entanglement in fishing gear that was wrapped around a fin and inside its mouth.The deaths are a devastating blow to the whale’s fragile population and the scientists who have been working for decades to rebuild a species that was once hunted to the brink of extinction and now numbers about 525.Robert Michaud of the Group for Research and Education on Marine Mammals in Quebec said he was stunned to hear of such a high number of casualties in one season, when they would normally see about two cases involving whales being hit by ships or getting entangled in fishing gear.He added that an eighth right whale was freed from a snarl of fishing line on Wednesday by a team on board a research vessel in the same area.“It raises our concerns — when will this ever stop,” he said from Tadoussac. “It is a problem. We don’t know exactly what’s going on.”The losses also come after a low calving season, with the deaths now outpacing the number of babies born this year.Moira Brown, a right whale expert with the Canadian Whale Institute, said she had begun shifting her research attention to the Gulf region several years ago when she and her team noticed there were fewer North Atlantic right whales in their traditional haunts in the Bay of Fundy.In 2015, they found 35 of the whales in the area where the most recent carcasses were spotted. In a survey last year, they found 17 of the whales in the area.The challenge, she said, is determining that this is a whale habitat and then working with the fishing and shipping industries to come up with ways to protect the animals as has been done in other parts of the Maritimes by rerouting shipping lanes, alerting fishermen to whales’ presence and setting speed limits for vessels.“I think they’re shifting based on lack of sightings in the Gulf of Maine and less sightings in the Bay of Fundy,” she said.“The fishing industry and the shipping industry are aware of right whales elsewhere, but they’re not aware of them there because it’s really early days in us figuring out whether the whales are using this habitat.”last_img read more

Canada aligning with UK to fight global growth in coalfired electricity

first_imgOTTAWA – Canada is joining forces with the United Kingdom to push for a global crackdown on unabated coal-fired electricity.Eliminating, or at least reducing, the world’s reliance on coal is a critical step in the Paris climate change accord’s efforts to prevent the planet from warming more than two degrees Celsius over with pre-industrial times.Environment Minister Catherine McKenna is on a two-day trip to the U.K. and Ireland this week, pushing Canada as a global leader on climate change action.Today she will be in Ireland to be a panellist at a climate risk conference in Dublin and tour Ireland’s Marine Institute in Galway.During Wednesday’s stop in London she and Claire Perry, British minister of state for climate change and industry, announced plans to use their own national commitments to phase out coal power plants as a means to convince others to do the same.In a statement, the two said Canada and the U.K. are both committed to phasing out unabated coal use at home — Canada by 2030 and the U.K. by 2025 — and they are inviting others to jump on board during the next United Nations climate talks in Bonn, Germany in November.Unabated coal plants are those built without carbon capture or storage, which reduces their emissions significantly.About 40 per cent of the world’s power is generated from burning coal and in Canada one-tenth of electricity comes from coal plants.“All the models show you one of the key things that has to happen if we’re going to get anywhere close to our climate change commitments is that coal has to exit the energy mix as fast as possible and that means government intervention to cut it out,” said Rob Bailey, research director of energy, environment and resources at Chatham House, a British independent policy think tank.McKenna was the closing keynote speaker at Chatham House’s climate change conference Wednesday but Bailey said he hadn’t yet heard about Canada and Britain’s plans.“The devil is in the details of all these things, but that is exactly the kind of thing they should be doing,” said Bailey. “I think that’s very positive.”He said he’d also like to see Canada push for a coal phase-out commitment as part of the G7 talks, which Canada will host next spring in Charlevoix, Que.Bailey said when U.S. President Donald Trump decided to pull the U.S. out of the Paris climate accord, he left a big leadership gap, noting without joint leadership of China and the U.S. under President Barack Obama, the Paris agreement would never have been possible.Bailey said the next big step for Paris is that in 2020 the signatories are expected to resubmit their national emissions reductions targets, which have to get more ambitious if the two degree goal has any hope. He said if China and the U.S. stepped up with more ambitious plans others would have followed them.Now it’s going to need a coalition of countries to take the U.S.’s place because no one nation on its own is as wealthy, powerful or influential as the U.S. The U.K. and Canada both have the kind of national climate change plans that give them authority on the matter internationally and Bailey said they now need to really use it.“They need to build the tent,” he said. “The more rich countries and developing countries they can bring in on coal or other aspects of the climate agenda the better.”He noted Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s international position helps.“You have a prime minister who is high-profile internationally, charismatic, dynamic,” he said. “A lot of this does come down to personalities at the end of the day and that’s somebody who could potentially catalyze things if they invest the political time in a diplomatic effort.”Urgewald, a German environmental organization, in June, released a list of 850 new coal-fired plants on tap to be built in 62 nations, including 33 which currently don’t burn much, if any coal, to make electricity. If they are all built it will increase coal-fired power production 45 per cent.-follow @mrabson on Twitter.last_img read more

Five Independents now registered with Integrity Commission

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, TCI, November 1, 2016 – At least five independent candidates have registered their interest to run in the December 15 General Elections with the Integrity Commission. Damian Wilson, Clarence Selver and Jasmin Walkin all reported that they have taken that step to becoming official nominees whenever nomination day is announced. Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Michael Misick, the former Premier who is running at large as an independent was first this morning since around 8:30 am to register with the IC, next was independent for the South Caicos seat, McAllister Piper Hanchell.  Related Items:last_img

Mamata welcomes IAF officers return

first_imgKolkata: With India’s fighter pilot Abhinandan Varthaman returning to his homeland on Friday night after being in Pakistan’s custody for two days, Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee welcomed his return.”Welcome home #AbhinandanVarthaman Welcome home sweet home,” Banerjee wrote on her Twitter handle. Banerjee on Thursday accused the Narendra Modi government of seeking political mileage over the air strike carried out by the Indian Air Force in Balakot, stressing on the fact that the Centre is yet to divulge the truth about the terrorists allegedly killed in the strike. Also Read – Bose & Gandhi: More similar than apart, says Sugata Bose”The people of India have a right to know what exactly happened during the air strike. The Centre must allow our forces to speak the truth. They should also come clean on the number of terrorists claimed to have been killed during the air strike,” Banerjee had maintained. While speaking to the media at Nabanna on Thursday, the CM hit out at the Modi government, saying: “Ahead of the forthcoming elections, the Centre is keen on deriving political mileage from the air strike that has been conducted by our Air Force. The jawans defend our borders and we all hold them in high esteem. But politicising the whole issue only to satisfy one’s political interest is condemnable.”last_img read more