Watch Bob Weir & Grace Potter Sing “Friend Of The Devil” In New Official Dear Jerry Video

first_imgGrateful Dead fans are sure to remember Dear Jerry, the all-star tribute to Jerry Garcia that featured all members of the Dead’s surviving Core Four and pretty much everyone else from the jam scene as well. The creators of Dear Jerry recently announced an official audio/video release for fans everywhere, and celebrated that announcement with a video of “Touch Of Grey” from the performance.Today, the Dear Jerry folks have returned with a new video. Ahead of the October 14th release is a new video of “Friend Of The Devil,” featuring Bob Weir and Grace Potter singing the Garcia & Hunter classic. Thanks to Entertainment Weekly, we can watch the emotional performance in the stream below.Says Potter of the performance, “The skeletal body of that song will never change, and the way that it makes you feel will never change, but you can play it a million different ways… We’re going to tweak it out a little bit, get a little weird.”For more on the new Dear Jerry release, head here. The full tracklisting can be seen below.Tracks:“The Wheel” / “Uncle John’s Band,” Phil Lesh & Communion“Shady Grove,” David Grisman“(I’m A) Road Runner,” Peter Frampton“Deal,” Buddy Miller“Sugaree,” Jorma Kaukonen“The Harder They Come,” Jimmy Cliff, Mickey Hart, Bill Kreutzmann“Fire On The Mountain,” Jimmy Cliff, Bob Weir, Mickey Hart, Bill Kreutzmann“Help On The Way” /” Slipknot” / “Franklin’s Tower,” Bill Kreutzmann’s Billy & The Kids“Scarlet Begonias” / “I Know You Rider,” The Disco Biscuits, Bill Kreutzmann’s Billy & The Kids“Loser,” moe.“St. Stephen,” O.A.R.“Bertha,” Los Lobos & Bob Weir“Brown-Eyed Women,” Trampled By Turtles“Shakedown Street,” Yonder Mountain String Band“Friend Of The Devil,” Bob Weir & Grace Potter“Tennessee Jed,” Eric Church“Morning Dew,” Widespread Panic“Touch of Grey,” Bob Weir, Mickey Hart, Bill Kreutzmann“Ripple,” Full Ensemblelast_img read more

Woodruff Lecture

first_imgFood science and food safety have become hot topics in recent years. David Lineback, a food scientist and carbohydrate chemist at the University of Maryland, will speak on both at the annual J.G. Woodruff Lecture on April 8 in Athens.His talk on “Food Science and Food Safety—Present and Future Perspectives” will be held at 2 p.m. in Masters Hall at UGA’s Georgia Center in Athens, Ga. A reception will follow at 3 p.m.Lineback is a senior fellow and retired director of the Joint Institute for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition at the University of Maryland at College Park. Before going to Maryland, he was dean of the University of Idaho College of Agriculture. He has also served as head of the food science departments at North Carolina State University and Pennsylvania State University.Currently, he chairs the scientific advisory panel of the American Association of Cereal Chemists.Each year, a researcher, educator, industry or policy official is invited to lecture in the honor of the late J.G. Woodroof, who was a pioneer in food science research.Woodroof began his food science research in 1929. He organized the food science department at the Georgia Experiment Station in Griffin around 1940. Today, the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences’ food science department and UGA Center for Food Safety are among the preeminent food science research centers in the country.For more information about the lecture, call (706) 542-2286.last_img read more

Nicaraguan Government Harasses Catholic Clergy

first_imgBy Julieta Pelcastre / Diálogo January 23, 2020 In Nicaragua, the Catholic Church is one of the most critical voices of President Daniel Ortega’s actions, denouncing reprisals, murders, and human rights violations in the country.The Church’s remarks are a “major annoyance” to Ortega, who sees its members as his enemies for denouncing the truth, said to Diálogo Marcos Carmona, president of Nicaragua’s Permanent Commission on Human Rights.“Throughout 2019, the Nicaraguan president intensified harassment and violence against Catholic churches that sided with people who took to the streets to express their disagreement with the Sandinista regime’s authoritarian actions,” Carmona said.A group of masked people loyal to Daniel Ortega meet outside a Catholic church in Diriamba, Nicaragua, to intimidate mass attendees, July 9, 2019. (Photo: Carlos Herrera / AFP)Nicaraguan bishops served as mediators in meetings between the state and civil society to find a peaceful resolution to the sociopolitical crisis the nation has been going through for two years. Talks were suspended in the spring of 2018, after security forces’ repression against the population escalated and public protests were criminalized.Ortega blamed the Catholic clergy of being “pro-coup” for supporting injured protesters during the 2018 protests, according to Nicaraguan state media El 19 Digital. The government onslaught against the religious institution includes priests, nuns, and parishioners. Edwin Román, a priest at the Saint Michael Church in Masaya, told the press that the wave of violence the Church experiences surpasses the attacks it faced in the 1980s, during the civil war.Ramón Alcides Peña, a pastor at the church in the municipality of Jícaro, was detained for 12 hours on December 7, charged with disrupting public order. The priest said on social media that he was celebrating mass as usual.In November, followers of the Sandinista regime entered the Metropolitan Cathedral in Managua and attacked a priest and a nun. The same month, in Masaya, they attacked parishioners of the San Bautista parish, while police surrounded the Saint Michael the Archangel Church to prevent displays of solidarity with the priest Román and a group of mothers who went on a hunger strike for nine days to call for the release of their children, detained for demanding the end of the regime.Ortega himself threatened the opposition. “The people will feel within their rights, with the obligation, to seek arms to take power through revolutionary means,” he said in November before the Political Councils’ assembly of the Bolivarian Alternative for Latin America and the Caribbean (ALBA, in Spanish).“I feel that it’s a real possibility. The more the doors for a peaceful road close, the wider they open for an armed one,” said Rafael Solís Cerda to French radio RFI. Solís was a guerrilla fighter with Ortega and a judge at Nicaragua’s Supreme Court for 19 years, until his resignation in February 2019.last_img read more

One and done compliance training doesn’t cut the mustard

first_imgDo you ever feel like compliance training is constantly on your mind? If you answered yes, you may actually be doing it wrong.We all know how important training is to a sustainable and successful compliance effort. Yet, without a strategic training plan, all that time spent shopping, arranging and traveling for here-and-there sessions eats up time and leaves you with a less-than-satisfactory result.Strategic training plans are more than a calendar of online courses. A truly effective plan takes into account the full picture and asks:What kind of training do we need?Which staff members require the training?Which methods are best for presenting the information?How often does it need to happen?Take teller staff. These professionals require a very different kind of Bank Secrecy Act (BSA) training than mortgage lenders, for example. The same online BSA course for all employees isn’t going to provide the specific, job-related information that individual staff need to meet BSA requirements. Of course, it’s critical training be provided to all employees. It’s just that the training has be relevant to their responsibilities to be truly effective. A generic overview of regulatory requirements won’t cut the mustard.It’s also important to remember a one-and-done approach to training doesn’t work. For instance, tellers must balance strict responsibilities with outstanding member service, which can put regulatory requirements on the back burner. Regular and periodic BSA training for them, as well as other employees, is helpful to keeping compliance right where it should be – at the front of their minds.When tackling the “when” of your strategic plan, consider how your credit union handles training for new employees. Do you assign them a slew of online courses and call it good, or do you take the opportunity to provide them with valuable training that not only covers the rules, but also provides them with critical information specific to your credit union and to their duties?Put yourself in the shoes of the employees charged with completing compliance-driven duties. Imagine you are starting a new job. Your supervisor hands you a list of regulations governing how you should do your job and stops there. He doesn’t instruct you how to do your job so you are in compliance with those regulations. Surprisingly, the “how to” is often overlooked in training sessions. Think of your mortgage lenders. These folks have faced arguably the largest regulatory upheaval in their day-to-day duties in recent years. Training that not only covers the regulatory requirements, but also includes the specific processes your credit union has implemented to comply with those requirements, is likely very welcome.After you’ve mapped out what specific types of training the employees in each area of your credit union need, think about how often the training should be provided. When regulations change is an easy one. Most all credit unions conduct training around important updates. But, what about the regulations that aren’t getting all the attention? Are you remembering to include those in the training plan?Again, we often rely on online courses to meet training requirements, but a review should be conducted regularly to determine whether those courses really do provide the level of training your employees need and deserve to perform the requirements of their jobs.All of this can sound a bit daunting. Fortunately, credit unions have many resources, ranging from free webinars to compliance consultants, to help them set up, manage and even conduct training for staff. If you continue to be overwhelmed even after finding help, get that chin up by thinking about this quote from Peter F. Drucker: “No one learns so much about a subject as one who is forced to teach it.” 38SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Cindy Williams Cindy Williams is vice president of regulatory compliance for PolicyWorks, a national leader of credit union compliance solutions. She can be reached at [email protected] Web: www.policyworksllc.com Detailslast_img read more