Smokers’ litter is biggest problem on Limerick streets

first_imgEmail Print Twitter Limerick centre needed to tackle environmental issues TechPost | Episode 9 | Pay with Google, WAZE – the new Google Maps? and Speak don’t Type! WhatsApp Previous articleCall for outside intervention to solve hospital overcrowding in LimerickNext articleTime to talk about mental health Bernie Englishhttp://www.limerickpost.ieBernie English has been working as a journalist in national and local media for more than thirty years. She worked as a staff journalist with the Irish Press and Evening Press before moving to Clare. She has worked as a freelance for all of the national newspaper titles and a staff journalist in Limerick, helping to launch the Limerick edition of The Evening Echo. Bernie was involved in the launch of The Clare People where she was responsible for business and industry news. DISCARDED cigarette butts account for almost half the littering on the streets of Limerick city and county, a meeting of the Environment committee of the local authority learned this week.Councillors were being briefed by Senior Executive Officer Dara McGuigan on the council’s five year Litter Management Plan.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up He told them that smoking-related litter, discarded butts, matches, lighters and packaging account for almost 54 per cent of all the litter found on the streets.Packaging and food-related litter were second and third on the list of offending items found thrown away, while dog fouling and dumped domestic waste are also a huge problem, he said.Cllr John Gilligan (Ind) said that the issue of owners not picking up after their dogs has to be tackled, but he allowed that it is a difficult issue.“Some of the owners are more vicious than their dogs if you try to approach them about not cleaning up,” he said.Cllr Kieran O’Hanlon (FF) said it was particularly disgusting for parents with buggies, and people using wheelchairs and the council needed to concentrate its efforts on areas where people are inclined to walk their dogs.Mr McGuigan said that pedestrians and motorists are responsible for 44 per cent of litter while retail outlets are the cause of another 44 per cent.“The plan is to work on awareness, education, cleaning and enforcement,” he said.Council workers collect 28 tonnes of litter a week from bins on the street.Cllr Marian Hurley (FG) asked if the council was looking at “other European models to deal with dog fouling”.Cllr Malachy McCreesh (SF) asked if the amount of packaging in litter is related to fly-tipping?“I think it is the biggest source of litter in the city and county. Enforcement doesn’t seem to be working. People feel there will be nothing done against them”.Cllr O’Hanlon said that the day of using May Eve bonfires as an excuse to clean out the back yard is gone and he asked that people would not leave rubbish on green areas”.Cllr Gilligan said the May Eve bonfires “were a lovely tradition which has died and it was killed by dirty people, which makes me very sad”.Cllr Elaine Secas (Lab) said that another focus should be on education. Children are really good at getting the message and spreading it. If we get the kids on board that is a great advantage”. TAGSEnvironmentLimerick City and CountyNewssociety Limerick on Covid watch list center_img Advertisement NewsEnvironmentSocietySmokers’ litter is biggest problem on Limerick streetsBy Bernie English – April 26, 2019 743 Local backlash over Aer Lingus threat RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Housing 37 Compulsory Purchase Orders issued as council takes action on derelict sites Linkedin Shannon Airport braced for a devastating blow Facebooklast_img read more

Look Back at Historic Ocean City at Free ‘Then and Now’ Presentation on Thursday

first_img Then: Park Place. Credit: Ocean City Historical Museum Now: Park Place. Credit: Michael McMahon Michael McMahon is more than a photographer. He’s a historian with a camera.He has matched current-day photos of places and scenes in Ocean City with similar or identical images in the Ocean City Historical Museum’s extensive collection.In quick succession, the screen shows a familiar spot the way it looks now and then switches to something less familiar from 50 or 100 years ago. The presentation is free and open to the public — at 7 p.m. Thursday, August 21, at the Ocean City Historical Museum (1735 Simpson Avenue).McMahon is the claims manager at the McMahon Insurance Agency, Inc. He has served as a member of the Ocean City Historical Museum Board of Trustees since 2009 with several years as the museum board’s vice president.His passions include photography, technology, social media and current events. He also enjoys sailing, golfing, running and traveling. He resides in Upper Twp., NJ, with his wife Danielle.Thursday’s presentation will include a time for a question-and-answer session.The Ocean City Historical Museum preserves history and celebrates those who make history.   McMahon’s “now” photos are likely to be the ones featured in a program such as this — perhaps 100 years in the future. The Museum is in the midst of a new members drive with memberrships ranging from $25 for individuals, $50 for families, $125 for benefactor. Corporate sponsorships are also provided by businesses in Ocean City. Members receive special opportunities and discounts at the museum.— News release from the Ocean City Historical Museum Now: Ninth Street and Boardwalk. Credit Michael McMahoncenter_img Then: Park Place. Credit: Ocean City Historical Museum Then: Ninth Street and Boardwalk. Credit: Ocean City Historical Museumlast_img read more

Press release: Debt management boss joins husband on disqualified director list

first_img act as a director of a company take part, directly or indirectly, in the promotion, formation or management of a company or limited liability partnership be a receiver of a company’s property Notes to editorsSmooth Financial Consultants Ltd (Company Reg no 05346052) was incorporated on 28 January 2005. The business also traded under the name of ‘The Debt Advice Centre’. The company went into Administration on 2 August 2013, with an estimated deficiency as regards creditors of £967,569.Mark John Broadstock is of Rixton, Warrington and his date of birth is February 1980. He was appointed as a director of Smooth on 1 March 2005, and remained so appointed until the date of Administration.Josephine Lester Broadstock is of Rixton, Warrington and her date of birth is March 1985. She was appointed as a director of Smooth on 26 May 2011 (having previously resigned on 1 October 2009), and remained so appointed until the date of Administration.Robert Marek Jones is of Bramhall, Stockport and his date of birth is November 1978. He was appointed as a director of Smooth on 31 January 2012. He left the company in May 2013, and resigned his directorship on 28 June 2013.The disqualification orders against Mrs Broadstock and Mr Jones were pronounced by HHJ Halliwell in the High Court of Justice, Chancery Division, Manchester District Registry on 8 August 2018.Miss Lucy Wilson-Barnes of Cobden House Chambers appeared for the Secretary of State and Mr Louis Doyle of Kings Chambers appeared for Mr Jones. Mrs Broadstock represented herself.A disqualification order has the effect that without specific permission of a court, a person with a disqualification cannot: The lengthy bans the directors have all received are entirely justified. Despite the detriment that was being caused to the clients, the directors continued to be well remunerated, and Mr and Mrs Broadstock, or third parties connected to them, even benefitted from spending of over £14,000 on the company’s credit card on a legal dispute, a holiday and airline tickets, an anniversary party, and a payment towards the cost of 4 season tickets in the executive lounge of a premier league football club. Not only was there continued misuse of the client funds and breaches of regulatory guidelines, the directors breached the trust of their clients, which is particularly distasteful given the financial difficulties they already experienced. Disqualification undertakings are the administrative equivalent of a disqualification order but do not involve court proceedings.Persons subject to a disqualification order are bound by a range of other restrictions.The Insolvency Service administers the insolvency regime, investigating all compulsory liquidations and individual insolvencies (bankruptcies) through the Official Receiver to establish why they became insolvent. It may also use powers under the Companies Act 1985 to conduct confidential fact-finding investigations into the activities of live limited companies in the UK. In addition, the agency deals with disqualification of directors in corporate failures, assesses and pays statutory entitlement to redundancy payments when an employer cannot or will not pay employees, provides banking and investment services for bankruptcy and liquidation estate funds and advises ministers and other government departments on insolvency law and practice.Further information about the work of the Insolvency Service, and how to complain about financial misconduct, is available.Contact Press OfficeMedia enquiries for this press release – 020 7674 6910 or 020 7596 6187 Office currently closed during the coronavirus pandemic. Josephine (Josie) Broadstock, 33 of Warrington, together with Robert Jones, 39 of Stockport, have been banned from being company directors following an Insolvency Service investigation.Husband and wife, Josie and Mark Broadstock, along with Robert Jones, were directors of Smooth Financial Consultants Ltd (Smooth). The company was incorporated in June 2005 and traded as The Debt Advice Centre before trading from Jackson House, Sale, Cheshire in 2012.Mark Broadstock was the Managing Director and Robert Jones was appointed as the Finance Director in January 2012, while Josie Broadstock was appointed a director on 26 May 2011.In return for a monthly fee, Smooth administered debt management plans and made payments to creditors on behalf of individuals experiencing difficulties in making payments to their creditors, for loans and credit cards.However, Smooth went into administration on 2 August 2013 and on 24 July 2014, went into creditors’ voluntary liquidation.During a 5-day trial in July 2018, the court heard that regulations governing debt management companies state that funds belonging to clients are to be held in a separate ‘ring-fenced’ client account. However, from at least 12 February 2013 onwards, Smooth made transfers from the client account to its own company account in excess of the agreed fees.The transfers were used for on-going running costs and for the benefit of the directors, who between them received salaries and dividends of £115,992 from 12 February 2013 to 2 August 2013, as well as third parties connected to Mr and Mrs Broadstock.The court also heard that between 12 February 2013 and 2 August 2013, Smooth failed to pay an estimated value of £572,001 to its clients’ creditors and after a winding up petition had been presented against the company on 1 July 2013, Mark Broadstock transferred £109,512 from the client account to a connected company.None of the funds were used for the benefit of the clients and after Smooth had gone into Administration, the administrators only recovered £49,678 from the connected company. Administrators estimated the shortfall on the client account to be £848,690.Before the court hearing, the Secretary of State accepted a disqualification undertaking from Mark Broadstock, on 9 June 2017 in which he did not dispute that he failed to ensure Smooth made all payments due to clients’ creditors, he caused or allowed transfers to be made from the client account in excess of fees due to Smooth, and after a winding up petition had been presented, he transferred £109,512 from the client account to a connected company for no genuine trading purpose. His ban became effective on 30 June 2017 and lasts for 10 years.On 8 August 2018 the Court made disqualification orders against Josie Broadstock (8 years) and Robert Jones (7 years), both of which commenced on 29 August 2018.The Court found that in failing to prevent the clients’ funds which were held on trust from being misused between 12 February 2013 and 2 August 2013, during which time cheques raised for clients’ creditors but withheld amounted to £572,001, Josie Broadstock’s conduct fell below the standards of probity and competence that could reasonably be expected of her as a director.Robert Jones left the company in May 2013 and while he was not aware that cheques to clients’ creditors totalling £69,223 were withheld prior to his departure, the court found he was aware that a substantial shortfall to clients had accrued by 12 February 2013, and in not taking any steps to prevent the company from continuing to misuse trust monies to meet its own cash requirements, his conduct also fell below the expected standards of probity and competence.Robert Clarke, Group Leader of Insolvent Investigations North at the Insolvency Service, said:center_img Email [email protected] You can also follow the Insolvency Service on: Press Office Media Manager 0303 003 1743 This service is for journalists only. For any other queries, please contact the Insolvency Enquiry Line.For all media enquiries outside normal working hours, please contact the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy Press Office on 020 7215 1000. Twitter LinkedIn YouTubelast_img read more