Fury as 79-year-old forced to be wheeled 200 yards to ambulance

first_imgA 79-year-old man had to be trolleyed more than 200 yards into an ambulance because a footbridge to his home has not been replaced. The man, who is confined to a wheelchair, collapsed at his home in Bunbeg, West Donegal overnight.However, emergency medical personnel could not get their vehicle near his home after the footpath collapsed and was washed away during flooding in August when the local River Clady burst its banks. Instead, the frustrated paramedics were forced to wheel the man more than 200 yards from his home to the main road where he could be taken by ambulance to hospital.The man’s son, Sean O Duibhir has slammed the delay in having the footpath replaced so that vehicles can cross it.The 79 year old man being wheel from his home.“Thankfully dad is okay but I had to call neighbours to help us wheel him down to the road with the paramedics.“It was dark but at least it was not raining. But wheeling a sick man two hundred yards down a road and across a temporary bridge just so he can get into an ambulance is just not on. “The bridge needs to be replaced immediately but we have heard nothing as to when that will be,” said Sean.Local county councillor Micheal Mac Giolla Easbuig is fuming at the delay in replacing the bridge.He said “This is utterly and totally unacceptable that this has happened in this day and age. The Government has completely failed this family.The homes of three families in Gweedore including a wheelchair bound resident who are trapped after flooding demolished the bridge into their homes. (North West Newspix)“This man had to be wheeled by ambulance personnel, helped by family and neighbours for more than 200 yards to reach the ambulance.“They have completely stripped him of his dignity and all because they will not properly replace the bridge. “The Government needs to do the right thing by this family and fix this bridge once and for all,” he said.Sean and Martina Diver and children after the bridge was washed away. (North West Newspix)Fury as 79-year-old forced to be wheeled 200 yards to ambulance was last modified: October 24th, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:ambulancebridgeBunbegdonegalRepairslast_img read more

Video: Grease rocks again in Cape Town

first_imgThe classic musical Grease is on at Cape Town’s Artscape Theatre until 11 April. Catch a glimpse of the show, and hear from some of the actors who bring its timeless characters to life.Click arrow to play video.Published on SouthAfrica.info on 24 March 2010.last_img

Invest in South Africa via the JSE

first_imgSouth Africa boasts mature capital markets that serve the domestic economy as well as the wider continent. The Johannesburg Stock Exchange (JSE) is the world’s 19th largest exchange, and offers investors five key financial markets: equities, bonds, currency, equity and commodity derivatives. History The JSE was formed in 1887 to facilitate the first South African gold rush. Following the first legislation covering financial markets in 1947, the JSE joined the World Federation of Exchanges in 1963 and upgraded to an electronic trading system in the early 1990s. The bourse demutualised and listed on the JSE in 2005. In 2003 the bourse launched AltX, an alternative exchange for small and mid-sized listings, followed by the Yield X for interest rate and currency instruments. The JSE acquired the South African Futures Exchange (SAFEX) in 2001 and the Bond Exchange of South Africa (BESA) in 2009.Equity market With a market capitalisation of $929-billion as of the end of 2012, Johannesburg is the biggest exchange on the continent, significantly larger than both Cairo ($60-billion) and Lagos ($55-billion). It is also highly liquid, with the value of trades hitting R3.4trillion ($418.2-billion) in 2012, up from R3.3trillion ($400.1-billion) in 2011 and R3-trillion ($364.5-billion) in 2010. There are approximately 400 companies listed on the exchange across Main Board and AltX. While a number of heavyweights like AngloGold Ashanti, British American Tobacco, SABMiller and telecommunications firm MTN account for a large share of the market, the exchange has cultivated a diverse variety of offerings. The JSE is indexed by the FTSE/JSE Africa Index Series, a partnership between JSE and the FTSE Group. The main two measurements of performance are the All Share Index (ASI), covering 99% of market capitalisation, and the All Share Top 40 Top Companies Index, which tracks the top listings in a representative spread of sectors. South African bond market South Africa’s fixed-income market accounts for 96% of the value of all African bonds. The majority of South African bonds are issued by government and state-owned entities but the number of corporate bonds issued is growing. Bond trading is available on the stock exchange, which also offers over-the-counter depository services and a variety of bond-based derivatives, including bond futures, forward-rate agreements, vanilla swaps and standard bond options. The JSE is aiming to attract new issuers to the bourse, including those offering rand- denominated foreign notes, which are now treated as domestic securities following a successful negotiation with the South African Reserve Bank. In November 2012 the Namibian government floated a R850-million ($103.6-million) 10-year bond priced at 8.26%, the first tranche of a R3-billion ($365.7-million) programme, and the JSE hopes to encourage other African countries to list debt on the exchange.Derivatives The JSE offers trading of a variety of derivatives, including futures and options on equities, bonds, indices, interest rates, currencies and commodities. The JSE is ranked the sixth top exchange by number of single stock futures traded and ninth by the number of currency derivatives traded in 2012 in the World Federation Annual Derivatives Survey. FSB website: www.fsb.co.zaReserve Bank website: www.resbank.co.za Website: www.world-exchanges.org Foreign listings In 2011, South Africa’s inward listing rules were changed to allow foreign domiciled companies to be treated as domestic listings. While foreign firms had been allowed to list on the JSE since 2004, they had been subject to foreign exchange rules, which limited the amount of these equities that local investors could hold. The lifting of these restrictions has been an important regulatory shift for the exchange makes the JSE a more attractive listings destination. Information supplied by the JSE. For more, visit www.jse.co.za Reviewed: 6 June 2013Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo material While these regulatory changes will likely hasten the move of trading from OTC to the JSE, the JSE have also taken steps to make the exchange a more attractive platform for this activity. This includes improving transparency in the JSE’s fee structure and continuous product innovation. Membership More than 110 equities and 50 bond brokers are licensed in South Africa, a mixture of local and foreign outfits. There are more than 100 equity derivatives members, 50 commodity derivatives members and more than 50 currency derivatives members.Technology The JSE has undertaken major technological upgrades to improve the latency of trading times and embarked on reform of the clearing and settlement timeframe. In July 2012 the JSE implemented a new trading platform the Millennium Exchange in the equities market, while at the same time moving the trading system from London to Johannesburg. Following this successful transition trades can now be executed up to 400 times faster than under the previous TradElect system. The change allows for increased liquidity and more high-frequency traders. Regulation The JSE currently acts as the frontline regulator, setting listing requirements and enforcing trading rules. The Financial Services Board (FSB) supervises the JSE in the commission of its regulatory duties and, as the JSE has no criminal or civil jurisdiction, processes any cases where statutory legislation has been contravened. The regulatory landscape is set to change significantly in the near future, as South Africa looks to implement a twin peaks model of oversight. Under the new system, prudential supervision will be transferred to the South African Reserve Bank (SARB) and market conduct regulation will be led by a bolstered FSB. The JSE will continue to act as frontline regulator while it will report to the FSB as the lead regulator, a concept endorsed in 2012 to avoid overlaps in jurisdiction between the FSB and the Reserve Bank. South Africa is currently ranked 1st in the world in terms of regulation of securities exchanges in the World Economic Forum’s Global Competitiveness Survey for 2012- 2013. This is an accolade for both the JSE its regulators. last_img read more

Rugby’s full story: the Springbok Experience Rugby Museum

first_imgIn a country that is passionate about sport, the Springbok Experience Rugby Museum displays the full story of rugby in South Africa. It opened in Cape Town on 24 September 2013 and has already been nominated for an international accolade. Visitors enjoy the high level of interaction offered within its walls. Through its sculpture, the Springbok Experience Rugby Museum captures one of rugby’s greatest moments: Nelson Mandela and 1995 Bok captain Francois Pienaar shaking hands after South Africa won the World Cup. (Image: Springbok Experience Rugby Museum) • South Africa’s Rugby World Cup journey • South Africa announces 2015 Rugby World Cup squad • Watch: Giving South Africa the #HomeGroundAdvantage • Clive Rice: South African cricketing icon dies at 66 • South Africa to host Commonwealth Games in 2022 Priya PitamberSport is close to many a South African heart. Soccer, rugby, cricket, athletics, among any number of other sporting codes, get the adrenaline racing and the heart pounding. The nation takes immense pride in its sportsmen and women, many of whom excel in their fields.South Africa’s love for rugby has expanded into the Springbok Experience Rugby Museum in Cape Town.“We’re proud of our sport and our heritage, so we wanted to take that out to the public and let people get close to it,” Andy Colquhoun, the general manager of corporate affairs at the South African Rugby Union (Saru), told Cape Town Magazine about the museum.Wild excitementA world away from the stuffy houses of historical facts and figures of old, a huge lure for visitors to the rugby museum is the high level of interactivity.“It delivers a technology-driven ‘wow’ experience for visitors, combining iconic object, interactive games and a rich audio-visual component to tell South Africa’s story through the eyes of its most powerful sport,” informs the museum’s website. The museum is located at Portswood House at the V&A Waterfront in Cape Town. (Image: Springbok Experience Rugby Museum)“As you enter through the Springbok tunnel, moving shadows of players walking beside you, you’re plunged head first into the experience,” reads the Cape Town Magazine website. “A crowd cheers overhead, a giant screen shows rugga (rugby) action before you.”Colquhoun said the “big goal was to have wild excitement and movement and colour, not something static. It’s much more than just display cases and text.” He described the experience as immersive.Travel blogger Tamlyn Amber also praised the interactivity. “There are even fun, rugby ball-shaped facts (which you flip up to read the answer) dotted here and there, that all serve to make for a more enjoyable and engaging experience,” she wrote, after her visit to the museum. “This is the perfect example of a modern museum.”The good and the badThere are artefacts that commemorate rugby’s highlights. Think of the boots Joel Stransky wore when he kicked that famous drop goal; that flag signed by the entire squad when they played New Zealand in 1937; that No. 6 jersey Francois Pienaar wore in 1995.On the other hand, it also keeps in mind the darker aspects of rugby – how it was used as a force of division.“The exhibit effectively weaves together the traditional account of white rugby with the often ignored tale of the development of black and coloured rugby before unity in 1992,” reads the Cape Town Magazine website. “So, even those who think they’re the ultimate fan are likely to learn about a side to the game they never knew existed.”Creating nostalgiaThrough its social media accounts, the museum looks back on players and iconic moments.Can you recall what these guys did for us 20 years ago? #1995reunited @flySAA pic.twitter.com/waosVhylj5 — Springbok Experience (@Bokmuseum) June 24, 2015124 years ago today the Currie Cup was first earned by Griquas. Read the story here. https://t.co/c7SJX1gpbk pic.twitter.com/W44MpPi2Ns — Springbok Experience (@Bokmuseum) July 20, 2015This is the oldest black African club in SA. But when were the founded? Find out here: https://t.co/c7SJX1gpbk pic.twitter.com/vgk7MHrmMV — Springbok Experience (@Bokmuseum) August 6, 2015Recognition and receptionIn 2014, the museum was nominated for the International Award in the UK’s Museum and Heritage Awards.“Visited the museum on our trip from New Zealand,” wrote Brian Damon on the museum’s Facebook page. “What a spectacular experience. Everything was so impressive and made me very nostalgic. A must to see for overseas visitors. Keep up the good work.”Amazing story and history of Springbok rugby @Bokmuseum the game we love will continue to change and I will continue to support with pride. — Gavin Ferreira (@GavinFerreira) August 26, 2015 The museum has a nomination for the International Award in the UK’s Museum and Heritage Awards. (Image: Springbok Experience Rugby Museum)See the Springbok Experience Rugby Museum website for more details about tickets and opening hours.last_img read more

A New Course Offering from Marc Rosenbaum

first_imgEnergy expert and engineer Marc Rosenbaum will begin teaching a 10-week online course on deep energy retrofits on September 14, 2015.According to the online course description, “It’s a course for professionals who are serious about transformative energy upgrades in residential and commercial buildings. As a capstone project, you will generate a deep energy retrofit (DER) strategy for a building of your choice with the help of Marc and your classmates.”Among the topics that Rosenbaum will cover:How to assess if a house is a good candidate for a deep energy retrofit (DER)How energy is used in most houses, and how DERs change thatTypical deficiencies of existing homes and how a DER addresses themHeat flow, moisture flow, vapor retarders, and how to perform a simple heat loss calculationBuilding blocks of a DER—air tightening, foundations, walls, windows, roofs — and the range of approaches that have been successfulHeating, cooling, ventilation, and domestic hot water technologiesCase studies of successful DERs.The course is offered in partnership with the Northeast Sustainable Energy Association (NESEA). Tuition is $995; if you sign up soon, you can take advantage of a $100 online discount.Marc Rosenbaum is a well-known energy consultant and the director of engineering at South Mountain Company on the island of Martha’s Vineyard in Massachusetts. He is the author of many Green Building Advisor articles, including Minisplit Heat Pumps and Zero-Net-Energy Homes and Practical Design Advice for Zero-Net-Energy Homes.More information on the online course is available here: Deep Energy Retrofits course.A free 32-minute video by Marc Rosenbaum — a teaser for his upcoming course — has been posted here: Deep Energy Retrofit Case Study.last_img read more

5 Things to Consider Before Shooting Slow Motion

first_imgShooting slow motion video is easier than ever before, thanks to advances in camera tech. Still, there are some challenges to consider before starting your next slow motion project.For the longest time, independent filmmakers have been frustrated by the fact that they weren’t able to capture high quality slow motion video. Up until recent years, your options were mostly limited to shooting at 720/60p with a highly compressed codec (such was the case with the 5D Mark II), unless you were willing to shell out a lot more money to buy or rent a higher end cinema camera.Over time, camera manufacturers started to recognize the fact that their customers were demanding higher frame rates (for slow motion usage), and we are finally starting to see a critical mass of cameras offering that ability. The GH4 can shoot at up to 96fps (as mentioned above), the Canon C100 Mark II does full 1080/60p (although they’re a bit late to the game), and the camera that many of us have right in our pockets – the iPhone 6 – can shoot at up to 240fps!Image from Vision ResearchFor the most part, this is great news – the more tools that we have access to as filmmakers, the better. That said, the fact that many of us have been deprived of high frame rates for so long is starting to create an overuse of slow motion content, much like we saw with the overdone shallow depth of field that was occurring when the 5D MK II first came out.There are plenty of slow motion tips and tricks out there – for instance, this great article from Shutterstock and this in-depth collection of insight from Gizmodo. The following video from The Slanted Lens is very informative, too.Now, let’s go over five things that you should consider before you choose to shoot slow motion:1. You Need More LightIf you haven’t shot slow motion before, you probably aren’t anticipating just how much light you need in order to get a decent exposure on your image. Shooting overcranked means that not only does your frame rate increase, but your shutter speed does too.Assuming you are following the 180 degree shutter rule, if you’re shooting at 96fps, your shutter needs to be at around 1/200th of a second, which will drop your exposure significantly. This isn’t such a big deal if you’re shooting outside in the middle of the day, but if you’re planning on shooting an interior or a night exterior – you’re going to need a lot of light, and you need to know how to use it.2. It’s Easy to Overdo ItOne of the easiest ways to annoy your audience is to overdo slow motion. Often footage looks great in slow motion, but that doesn’t mean everything needs to be shot that way. If you’re not careful, you can fall into a pretty bad trap. Like most stylistic choices, less is more when it comes to overcranking, so use it sparingly if you want to be tasteful.3. It Might Not Be Right for Your ProjectMany shooters go a little bit crazy when they buy their first camera that has the ability to overcrank, and not only do they overuse the effect (as described above), but they use it on projects that don’t call for it. While there may not be any hard and fast rules on this, for the most part slow motion works really well in music videos, some commercials, and in small doses in narrative films.Unfortunately, many filmmakers end up using a ton of slow motion in documentary projects or narrative films, in situations where it really isn’t needed. Obviously, there’s a time and a place for slow motion in a doc or fictional film, but more often than not, it just isn’t the right choice. In other words, don’t use it just because you can… use it if it’s the right storytelling device for your project.4. The Image Quality Will Be DiminishedNo matter what format you’re shooting on, you are likely going to diminish the quality of your image significantly by shooting slow motion. The reason behind this is simple math. Typically, cameras have a set data rate that they record to per second, and when you increase the amount of frames per second, you are spreading that data very thin by stretching it over many more frames.Even on the RED DRAGON (which of course shoots RAW), in order to capture certain frame rates, the minimum compression ratio required is increased significantly. This doesn’t mean that you can’t capture a beautiful slow motion image, but it does mean that you need to be especially careful about how you capture your image so you retain the highest IQ possible.5. Storage Requirements Can Go Through the RoofImage from ShutterstockThis will vary from camera to camera, but generally higher frame rates require far more data/storage than standard frame rates. Certain lower-end cameras are able to keep the data rates about the same even when shooting overcranked (but then the issue of the IQ getting diminished comes into play), but most cinema cameras chew through cards like crazy when shooting at high frame rates.I recently shot a short film on the RED EPIC, which had a lot of very slow motion shots (about 120fps on average), and I had to be very careful about how much I was shooting, as the cards got eaten up very quickly. This is really important to consider if you haven’t shot slow motion before.If you’re looking for more slow motion advice, try these links:The Basics of Shooting Slow Motion Video – The Slanted LensIntro to Slow Motion Video – Red Digital Cinema Camera CompanyThe Beauty of Slow Motion – PremiumBeatHave any tips for shooting slow motion footage? We’d love to hear them in the comments below. Thank for sharing!last_img read more