Picture Special: Well known south Donegal pub for sale for €125,000

first_imgOne of south Donegal’s oldest and well-known pubs has been placed on the market, it has emerged. Biddy’s Bar of Glencolmcille, which was built over 200 years ago, has been a popular well-loved watering hole for tourists who visit the Gaeltacht village. However, after years of falling into disrepair, the current owners have now took the decision to sell the pub.The folk village is on the Atlantic coast west of Donegal Town in the north-west of Ireland. It consists of several small cottages in the Gaeltacht.It was built and maintained by the local people and it is one of Ireland’s best living-history museums.Biddy’s Bar of GlencolmcilleThe cottages are exact replicas of those used by local people in the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries and fitted with the furniture of this period.The property can be found listed on daft.ie: “We are delighted to offer for sale, this former traditional public house known locally as Biddy’s Bar of Glencolmcille. The property comprises of a two-storey detached building consisting of a bar and lounge that extends to approximately 216 sq.m / 2,325 sq.ft in area. “The ground floor comprises of a bar with direct access onto the main street and is connected to a separate lounge.“The first-floor accommodation positioned over the ground floor also consists of a bar and lounge and features a double-height vaulted ceiling with exposed stone walls.“The remaining accommodation comprises of a sizable lean-to consisting an open-span bar with independent access.”Picture Special: Well known south Donegal pub for sale for €125,000 was last modified: October 31st, 2019 by Staff WriterShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

For the love of dogs: Training and hunting with Brittany Spaniels

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Sportsmen often find one or two specific niches for which they develop a sincere, lifelong passion. One such niche is upland hunting with bird dogs — a sport that devotees would describe as a pleasurable obsession, or maybe even an addiction.Recollecting a tremendous day’s hunt with his bird dogs, Sage and Abbie, famed television journalist Tom Brokaw once reflected on his life, “I’ve interviewed presidents and royalty, rock stars and movie stars, famous generals and captains of industry. I’ve had front rows seats at Super Bowls, World Series, and Olympic Games; my books have been on best-seller lists, and my marriage is a long running success. That day with Sage and Abbie is right up there when I come to reckon, ‘How did one guy get so lucky?’”And popular Western writer Tom McGuane says that for him, “The dogs are everything, and they want to hunt, too. Bird dogs plead with you to imagine the great things you could be doing together. Their delight is a lesson in the bliss of living.”Closer to home, Eric Sarakaitis, of Johnstown, is a man who loves the act of bird hunting, but appreciates the artful beauty of working bird dogs even more. For him, the dogs really are everything.“For me, it is more about watching the dog work and rewarding the dog for a good point by shooting the bird. Walking up to a dog that is on point is the most intimate moment in the woods or field I have experienced. There is a time when I am so focused and in tune with the dog, that I can’t hear or see anything beyond the dog on point, knowing that what is about to happen is going to be special. There is such great anticipation and excitement about the sound of the flush and the concealed bird exploding up off the ground,” Sarakaitis said.Sarakaitis hunts over Brittany Spaniels, preferring their cooperative nature and the pleasurable addition they are to his household.“I have four Brittanies —  two males, Diesel and Captain, and two females, Addie and Bella —and they are true companions first, and a hunting tool second,” he said.As an illustration of his love for these dogs and his hunting interests, a large portion of his property has been set aside for his animal cohorts. Sarakaitis has created an impressive facility to train and exercise his dogs.“I have two acres fenced with no-climb horse fence. A little less than half of it is wooded, which provides great opportunities to train for grouse and woodcock. I can set up training scenarios with dense wooded cover, which is difficult to do in most training areas. Not only does it give them a good training environment, but it is also a safe, secure playpen for them. They have a lot of area to run and exercise and stay healthy for hunting season,” Sarakaitis said.Within this fenced run, Eric also has a bird pen he uses for the raising and day-to-day storage of training fowl. The birds are housed in a four-by-four-by-eight-foot “Johnny House” with a connected four-by-eight-foot raised flight pen on the outside.“At any given time, I’ll have chukar, quail, and ideally pigeons — because they’re the most hardy — in my pen. These birds are used in all aspects of training, from teaching a dog to use its nose to scent mark the location of birds, steadying to point, and retrieving after the shot. During training, I employ the use of bird launchers, which is a mechanical apparatus with a remote release that launches the birds into flight. This allows me to release the birds at will and helps me when teaching obedience, commands, and such when I’m working with a dog,” he said.Eric begins to work with his bird dogs at a very young age, introducing them to quail from his bird pen as soon as they can run and see. He said that from the owner’s/trainer’s standpoint it is good to create a strong bond and understanding with one’s canine companion when they are still pups.“You are training them to hunt at the same time you are teaching them to listen,” he said.However, Sarakaitis does not do all of the training of the dogs by himself. He elicits the help of his other dogs as well.“It is good to have more than one bird dog for training — 90% of my pups’ manners and learning how to be hunting dogs are taught by their peers,” he said. “When training, you want to substantiate prey drive first, and then leverage that prey drive for further training in regard to pointing, steadying, introduction to the gun, and obedience. All that being said, in my experience, most dogs are ready for exposure to wild birds anywhere from six months of age to a year old. But that does not imply that their training and learning is finished.”Sarakaitis takes an annual autumn pilgrimage northward to Michigan to hunt grouse and woodcock. Due to dramatically diminishing grouse numbers in this state, he primarily hunts for pheasant and woodcock here in Ohio. He also does some dove hunting in the early fall, and brings a couple of his dogs with him on these excursions to retrieve downed birds.“Brittanies are not known to be strong retrievers but mine do well with it. For whatever reason, two of my dogs are absolutely phenomenal at retrieving doves,” he said.What Brittanies are known for is their relentless, “all business” attitude when released into the field and their keen sense of smell that will bring them to a tense, motionless stand-still when they detect a game bird hidden in a mat of dense cover. When hunting for pheasant throughout central and south-central Ohio, Sarakaitis and his dogs have a set method of operation to bag the birds.“As much as possible, I try to set up to hunt into the wind, paying attention to natural structure — breaks in cover, fencerows, tree lines. My dogs’ primary role is to quarter, or zigzag, across native prairie grasses such as switch grass, foxtail, and goldenrod, smelling for bird life. They are to hunt by scent alone, coming to freeze on point when the scent cone of the game has been identified,” Sarakaitis said. “I utilize both beepers and bells on my dogs for location purposes. When the bells stop ringing and the beepers go off to indicate the dogs’ motion has stopped —which means they have located a bird and are on point — my job is to get to the dog, then to flush and shoot at the bird and hopefully not miss.”While the dogs’ job and behavior is similar when hunting woodcock, the terrain differs dramatically. Woodcock, which migrate through Ohio on their way south in October and November, navigate by constellations at night, coming down into damp areas of heavy cover in the pre-dawn hours. Hunters can find them after their night flights in the dense and tangled world of sumac, alder, and dogwood trees, where the birds probe for the staple of their diet, earthworms. Hunting in such terrain can make the going slow and difficult, and getting to a dog on point an adrenalized challenge. And after the flush, be ready for some quick shooting through heavy cover, as woodcock have an uncanny ability to put trees and brush between themselves and the gun in a matter of moments.The close connection and intimate level of involvement that Sarakaitis has with his bird dogs is representative of gentleman bird hunters across this nation. In speaking with Sarakaitis and others of his like him, it becomes clear that they have bird dogs in their blood, and that these men’s lives are greatly enriched by their canine hunting buddies.Professor, writer, and bird dog aficionado Bob DeMott, of Athens, best captures this affectionate link between man and beast, writing “I never tire of watching a bird dog go about its nosey business…Maybe the profoundest mystery of all is how bird dogs insinuate themselves so deeply into our hearts and lives. Maybe the greatest question is why…we go on needing them so much?”last_img read more

Farm Bureau recognizes outstanding local programming

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Twenty county Farm Bureaus were honored for outstanding programming over the past year. Their recognition as Achievement Award winners came during the 99th annual meeting of Ohio Farm Bureau, Dec. 6 – 8 in Columbus.The winning counties represent excellence in local activities that support Farm Bureau’s strategic efforts. Those include programs to strengthen the organization and build membership, affect public policy, promote agriculture and enhance the organization’s relationship with long-standing partner Nationwide.Additionally, Collaboration Awards were presented to groups of counties that worked together to create unique and effective programming.The award applications were judged by volunteer Farm Bureau members, and counties were placed in four divisions based on the size of their membership.During the awards ceremony, Ohio Farm Bureau Executive Vice President Adam Sharp said, “Every member in the county plays an important part in these programs’ success, from volunteering to serve on action teams and committees, to the planning of the various activities, to talking with neighbors about the issues that impact agriculture and how important it is for all of us to keep Farm Bureau and agriculture strong.”The top counties were:Carroll —  Substance Abuse Prevention/Got Your Back programCrawford — Focus of Your Future programFayette — Farm to Fork Charity Event and War on DrugsFulton — Ag AdventuresGreene — Celebrating Ohio’s Apple HarvestHamilton — Fall Ag DayHancock — Kids Dream DayHarrison — Farm Bureau/FFA Career Day and Family Chicken BBQHenry — STEM Teacher Presentation programHolmes — Harvest for Hunger programJackson-Vinton — Agriculture Experience DayLake — Comprehensive Membership CampaignLogan —  Farm to Fork eventMedina — Agriculture Acres projectMercer —  Agriculture in Your Backyard programPutnam — Shaping the Future Ag TourRichland — Farm to Plate eventStark — County Fair DisplayTuscarawas — Weeding Out Substance Abuse in Rural Ohio programWashington — Farm City DayCollaboration awards were presented to:Ashtabula, Geauga, Lake, Trumbull and Mahoning counties — Livestock Transit Member BenefitCarroll and Tuscarawas counties — Weeding Out Substance Abuse in Rural Ohio/Farm Bureau’s Got Your Back CampaignCrawford and Wyandot counties — Focus on the Future event.last_img read more

U.P. puts Azam Khan’s name on list of land mafia

first_imgSamajwadi Party MP Azam Khan’s name has been put on an online list of land mafia by the district administration here following FIRs registered against him, drawing strong protest from his party. The SP raised the issue in the Legislative Council alleging that he is being framed in “fake” cases.The State government dismissed the allegations, saying that it was treating everyone the same and the action was not driven by any political vendetta.Chief Minister Yogi Adityanath alleged that Rampur was an example of “land-grabbing” culture under the previous SP government. “The name of the Rampur MP has been put on the list of anti-land mafia portal of the State government on Thursday after FIRs were lodged against him on land-grabbing charges,” Additional District Magistrate (Administration) J.P. Gupta said. “The listing was done by the SDM Sadar,” he said. The former State Minister was named in the FIRs lodged in connection with alleged forcible acquisition of land for Mohammad Ali Jauhar University, of which he is the founder and Chancellor. District Magistrate A.K. Singh said the “farmers had claimed that Azam Khan had acquired their land for University through coercion”. “The name of those who have acquired someone’s land with alleged criminal acts and continue to have possession over it are included in the list,” the DM added. The SP, however, alleged that the move was a conspiracy by the Rampur DM to defame Mr. Khan and the university.21-member panelSP president Akhilesh Yadav has constituted a 21-member committee, led by the Leader of the Opposition in the Legislative Council, Ahmad Hasan, to “probe fake cases” against Mr. Khan.Proceedings in the Legislative Council were disrupted on Friday as the SP members protested against the issue. As soon as the House assembled at 11 a.m., Mr. Hasan raised the issue, saying, “The most painful thing is that Khan has taken land for building a university and not for any personal gains. In which direction is the government going? Azam Khan is part of the land mafia?” Leader of the House and Deputy Chief Minister Dinesh Sharma termed the SP’s allegations “baseless”. “The government is treating everyone in the same manner, and it is not an act of vengeance.” “The allegations are baseless, and do not have any link with the policy and intention of the government,” he said. He added that since Mr. Khan is not a member of the House, the matter cannot be raised. Following this, Mr. Hasan requested the Chair that an all-party committee be formed, but Mr. Sharma opposed it. Amid unruly scenes, the Deputy CM sought cooperation of the Opposition to run the House. But the agitated SP members trooped into the Well, prompting Chairman Ramesh Yadav to adjourn the House till 12 noon. When the House re-assembled, Mr. Hasan raised the matter and SP members came into the Well of the House. Later, the Chairman adjourned the House till Monday.last_img read more