Alcohol misuse leads to ER

first_imgAt least 10 ambulances have responded to alcohol-related incidents on Notre Dame’s campus so far this semester, according to Notre Dame Security Police (NDSP). NDSP Director Phil Johnson said extreme intoxication should not be taken lightly. “Sometimes a student sees another student drink too much,” Johnson said. “Putting them to bed can be a very dangerous idea … You can’t simply put someone to bed who is intoxicated who might aspirate and stop breathing.” In 2010-2011, Johnson said ambulances transported individuals to the hospital for alcohol poisoning on 78 occasions. The prior school year, NDSP reported 76 alcohol-related dispatches for ambulances, and from 2008-2009, 71. At one of two local hospitals, students can receive treatment ranging from rehydration to stomach pumping for alcohol poisoning. Johnson said these statistics include both Notre Dame students and visitors to campus. Football weekends increase the risk of excessive intoxication on campus, Johnson said, and more alcohol-related trips to the hospital occur during the fall semester. “During the fall we often see an uptick, definitely an uptick on Saturdays [for football weekends],” Johnson said. Emergency medical responders need to evaluate a number of factors when they deal with a student who is extremely intoxicated. Johnson said an EMT will evaluate a patient’s level of responsiveness, general medical history, ability to speak and stand, blood alcohol content (BAC) and other factors. “From a first response standpoint, we make sure we get appropriate medical care to someone who needs it,” he said. In over 20 years with NDSP, Johnson said both law enforcement and campus officials have become more proactive about alcohol education. “I think now that we are more keenly aware of the perils of alcohol with an overdose, we are operating with more caution,” Johnson said. Some students are reluctant to call an ambulance for an underage friend in danger because they are afraid of disciplinary consequences for that person or for themselves, Johnson said. But he said discipline is far from the minds of emergency responders. “We’re trying to make sure people are safe and are getting the best care when presented with a potentially life-threatening situation,” he said. “Call 9-1-1, and take care of the person. Life safety comes first.” Kathleen O’Leary, director of Residence Life for the Office of Student Affairs, agreed with Johnson. “When a friend has consumed alcohol and you are concerned about their well-being, always contact hall staff or NDSP at 9-1-1 for medical assistance,” O’Leary said. “Leaving a friend to ‘sleep it off’ is extremely dangerous … While the University does not currently have a medical amnesty policy, the surrounding circumstances of an alleged violation of University policy are always taken into consideration.” O’Leary’s office handles discipline cases for students who are taken to the hospital for excessive drinking. “When addressing instances of severe intoxication, our office’s primary concern is for that student’s physical, emotional and spiritual health and well-being,” O’Leary said. “Students will meet with us to go through the disciplinary process, which we intend to be an educational one.” The disciplinary process is a chance to have “an educational conversation” about decision-making, as well as the University’s expectations and policies regarding alcohol possession and consumption. O’Leary said students could also receive alcohol assessment and education through the Office of Alcohol and Drug Education. “If the Office of Residence Life determines that a student is responsible for a violation of University policy, the nature of the offense and the circumstances surrounding it, the student’s prior disciplinary violations — if any — the impact of the misconduct on the community and prior similar cases will be among the factors considered in determining a sanction,” O’Leary said. According to du Lac, this sanction could include alcohol counseling, loss of on-campus parking and driving privileges, community service and disciplinary probation, among other punishments. Christine Nowak, director of the Office of Alcohol and Drug Education, said her office exists to educate students about the consequences of alcohol abuse. “We are student-friendly, student-driven and educational,” Nowak said. “We’re not a part of discipline, not a counseling office and not the police. We are giving students the power to make better decisions.” Excessive drinking is a problem on most college campuses, Nowak said. “There’s a progression, and at the far end of that progression is alcohol poisoning, sexual assault and property damage,” Nowak said. “The biggest change has to happen at the student level with students positively confronting other students … This is a safety concern and a health concern.” While some students might shy away from these conversations, Nowak said expressing concern about dangerous drinking habits to a friend is important. “For some folks, that’s all they need to hear from a friend,” Nowak said. “I have great faith that students can change the culture if they want to and make it safe and healthy for everyone … A lot of people have a social life without alcohol.”last_img read more

Candriam seeks to grow institutional business in Switzerland, Germany

first_imgNaïm Abou-Jaoude, chief executive at Candriam, told IPE the brand change was necessary, would reinvigorate the business and give it a positive momentum among clients and staff.He said now the transformation was complete, the business would focus on its third-party distribution and its institutional business – which accounts for around two-thirds of the manager’s assets.“With our new brand offering a fresh start, coupled with the stability of the management,” Abou-Jaoude said, “we can fully enhance the business, and in particular our relationships with the consultants, who are likely to be more open to having new discussions with us on what we can offer to their clients.”Candriam, within the next nine months, wants to grow institutional business in Switzerland and Germany while increasing third-party distribution exposure in the UK.Abou-Jaoude said institutional business in the UK was an ambition but would be more realistic in 18 months’ time.With regard to offerings, the chief executive said Candriam was looking to build on its previous products and provide more suitable solutions to institutional clients.“We want to go in two directions,” he said. “One is offering a flexible multi-asset fund, and a multi-asset income fund, which will capture the spreads from different asset class.“The second is short high-yield offering, using a combination of long-short strategies.”The firm is also working on equity products for its insurance clients that will utilise the benefits of derivatives, mitigating the downside of equity investing, and reducing the capital requirements under Solvency II.In terms of the asset manager’s new partnership with NYLIM, the firm said its expansion would not include the US, given its complementary offering to its parent’s other boutiques.“We cover some other products NYLIM does not have, so the idea is to complement the offering and see how we can develop synergies on both sides,” Abou-Jaoude said.Yie-Hsin Hung, co-president of NYLIM and chair of Candriam, told IPE the boutique owner would also continue its expansion after its foray in the European market with the Dexia acquisition.“We continue to want to grow our business,” she said.“Our aspiration would be to grow in areas we don’t have a presence today, but our immediate focus is that Candriam is successful and can leverage all the resources available from NYLIM.” Candriam, the new trading name for Dexia Asset Management, will look to expand its offering in three new territories following its rebrand and completed takeover by New York Life Investment Management (NYLIM).The manager, which was plagued by uncertainty for more than two years as it was subject to takeover talks, saw business deteriorate as clients awaited confirmation of the firm’s future.However, in December 2013, US-based NYLIM, the asset management arm of insurer New York Life, completed its rumoured takeover of the European manager, adding it to its multi-boutique operation.The following February, it was announced the firm would shed its Dexia brand, moving forward from the turmoil under the name Candriam.last_img read more