Darwinians Claim to See Evolution Happening Now

first_imgUnable to see evolutionary progress in the fossil record, some Darwinians try to claim they are watching it before our eyes.Since Darwin’s time, the fossil record has been a graveyard of evolutionary theories. Darwin knew it and mumbled out the record’s incompleteness. Stephen Jay Gould famously commented that sudden appearance followed by stasis was the “trade secret of paleontology.” Molecular clock studies often disagree with morphological studies, even granting millions of Darwin Years. Since they can’t find gradual evolution in the record, some Darwinians look for evidence of change in living organisms, including people. Their illustrations can appear quite ridiculous.Before reading the following examples, one must keep an eye on the ball. The ball is not just any change, but positive, innovative change by unguided natural selection that could take a bacterium to a human, given enough time. To claim that disease represents evolution, for instance, would be no more helpful to Darwinism than a company’s balance sheet that reported only losses.Evolutionary geneticists spot natural selection happening now in people (Hakhamanesh Mostafavi at The Conversation). How can you have evolution without speciation and reproductive isolation? If Mostafavi’s view of natural selection prevails, then every tiny variation within the human species becomes evidence for Darwinian evolution! It means that your own children have evolved from you. But even Mostafavi knows that evolution is supposed to be bigger than that:Cartoon by J. Beverly Greene for Creation-Evolution HeadlinesHuman evolution can seem like a phenomenon of the distant past which applies only to our ancestors living millions of years ago. But human evolution is ongoing. To evolve simply means that mutations – the accidental changes to genes that happen normally in the process of copying DNA – are becoming more or less common in the population over time.These changes can happen by chance, because the individuals who reproduced happened to carry a particular mutation somewhat more often than individuals who didn’t have children. They can also happen because of natural selection, when carriers of a specific mutation are better able to survive, reproduce or tend to their family members – and therefore leave more descendants. Every biological adaptation, from the ability of humans to walk upright on two feet to flight in birds, ultimately traces back to natural selection acting on these minute changes, generation after generation.So humans are definitely still evolving….Mostafavi is equivocating here about the definition of evolution. The examples he gives, like genes for lactose intolerance, do nothing to change Homo sapiens into another fitter species. He calls smoking evolution. He calls genes for Alzheimer’s Disease evolution. Can he point to any inherited trait that will help humans of the future grow a wing or a new sense organ? Of course not. None of this is evidence for Darwinian evolution by natural selection. Calling his minor variations “evolution” (especially when they are deleterious) amounts to blowing smoke.Great Tits May Be Evolving Bigger Beaks. Here’s Why. (National Geographic). Before proceeding, let us quickly calm our female readers by pointing out that the “great tit” (we didn’t name it) is a beautiful bird that lives in England (not in the Grand Tetons). Here’s a picture of one.National Geographic loses no time to credit Darwin for a slight change in beak size here, saying in the subtitle, “Since Darwin’s time, birds have served as models for the wonders of evolution—and this study was no exception.”They just keep coming back.Reporter Jason Bittel calls on evolutionist Lewis Spurgin (U of East Anglia) to celebrate another triumph of evolution by claiming that humans are modifying the birds’ evolution by setting up bird feeders. And yet Bittel is not even sure that the feeders caused a slight change in beak size between populations in the U.K. and the Netherlands. No matter; start the Darwin party!“We know that evolution by natural selection produces peacocks’ tails and giraffes’ necks and that sort of thing,” says Spurgin, whose findings were published today in Science….“But it also works in much more subtle ways that are much more difficult to observe.”This is just another case of making mountains out of molehills, like Darwinians did with “Darwin’s finches” on the Galapagos. Jonathan Wells roundly debunked that example of Icons of Evolution. How much easier could he dispense with this one? He would certainly call it a case of Zombie Science – dead arguments for Darwinism rising from the dead in the media.Spurgin was rebuked by other biologists for making too much of this, but he was too drunk on Darwine to stop partying:For Spurgin, this is all part of the fun. “I don’t imagine that Darwin in his wildest dreams could have thought that this stuff would have been happening,” he says.So do evolutionists really think these little birds with their tiny beaks reveal anything about Darwinism? In their dreams. Dreaming about natural selection is a cash cow in Britain. Science Daily indicates that Spurgin’s Darwine party was “funded by the European Research Council and the Natural Environment Research Council and supported by the Edward Grey Institute, University of Oxford.”Flu forecasting tool uses evolution to make earlier predictions (UChicago Medicine). Evolutionists keep trying to make a big deal out of influenza “evolution”, but the flu has never evolved into non-flu. This press release tries to make evolutionary theory sound useful. The team knows this is not evolution, but they credited Darwin anyway.Each year, four influenza strains circulate in the human population: H3N2, H1N1, and two B variants. These viruses spread seasonally each year because of a phenomenon known as antigenic drift. They evolve just enough to evade human immune systems, but not enough to develop into completely new versions of the virus.In other words, they are just variants of the same virus strains. The ones that “drift” enough from the antigen in the vaccine don’t get killed off. But they are still flu viruses, not even completely new versions of the flu virus. If the team can forecast what the new strain will look like earlier, that’s well and good, but this kind of ‘horizontal’ variation is not what Darwin had in mind. Viruses are not even independent organisms.Is biology behind your political views? (Phys.org). This question collapses with the self-refuting fallacy. “People can be biologically predisposed to certain feelings toward politics and society,” the proposition goes. But if biology predisposes one’s political views, then it also predisposes one’s scientific views. [Cue sound of short circuit.]The cartoon says it. Darwinism is kept aloft by the hot air of those whose careers depend on it.Our thanks to J. Beverly Greene for the illustration.(Visited 903 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

War against HIV/Aids ‘far from won’

first_img30 November 2011South Africa recorded an increase of 0.8% in the HIV prevalence of antenatal women between 2009 and 2010 – a clear indication, says Health Minister Aaron Motsoaledi, that the country’s war against HIV/Aids has yet to be won.The 2010 National Antenatal Sentinel HIV & Syphilis Prevalence Survey, conducted annually by the department for the past 21 years, was released by Health Minister Aaron Motsoaledi on Tuesday, ahead of World Aids Day on 1 December.The report showed that HIV prevalence among women who received antenatal treatment at the country’s clinics was 30.2% in 2010, compared with 29.4% in 2009.The study was conducted among a sample of 32 225 first-time antenatal care attendees last year, with 32 861 having participated in 2009.‘The war still has to be won’Speaking at the release of the survey, Motsoaledi said the figures showed that South Africa was “just holding back the tsunami” in the battle against HIV/Aids.“At the moment we are stable, but we think the war still has to be won … We need to fight the war.”The WHO/UNAids estimates the number of people living with HIV in South Africa for 2010 at 5.575-million. Of these, an estimated 518 000 are children under 15 years, while 2.95-million are adult females over the age of 15.Highest in KwaZulu-NatalThe highest provincial HIV prevalence was recorded in KwaZulu-Natal, which increased from 38.7% in 2008 to 39.5% in 2009 and stabilised at 39.5% in 2010.Other provinces with higher HIV prevalence estimates compared to 2009 were the Eastern Cape (29.9%), Gauteng (30.4%), Limpopo (21.9%), Mpumalanga (35.1%), Northern Cape (18.4%) and the Western Cape (18.5%).The North West and the Free State had lower HIV prevalence estimates, at 29.6% and 30.6% respectively.Lower in the 15-24 age groupThe study reflected that the peak in HIV prevalence (from 2007 to 2010) was now occurring in the 30-34 years age category.“The HIV prevalence in this group increased from 41.5% in 2009 to 42.6% in 2010,” the survey found.The encouraging finding was the decline in the prevalence rate in the 15-24 years age group, which dropped from 23.1% in 2001 to 21.8% in 2010.“Prevalence in the young group (15-24) is declining, and we suspect that our prevention methods in messages are reaching where they need to reach,” Motsoaledi said.Teenage pregnancy concernOf concern, however, was the teenage pregnancy rate revealed by a Department of Education sanctioned study spanning 2000 to 2008.It showed that teenage pregnancy was more prevalent in KwaZulu-Natal, with 15 027 cases, the Eastern Cape (11 852) and Limpopo (12 848).The Health Department’s survey showed that of 121 10-14 year olds that participated in the 2010 antenatal HIV survey, 11 (9.4%) were HIV-positive, which is an increase from the 7.3% recorded in 2008.“In all our prevention programmes, we need to include young children and work together with the Department of Social Development and Basic Education,” said Motsoaledi.He said the hostility shown to the department regarding the testing of children in schools was misplaced, adding that there was an urgent need to finalise the school health programme.“When the health workers visit the schools, they will also do sexual reproductive health so as not to confuse people.”‘Faithfulness is the main message’On the interventions to address the high prevalence in the older age group, Motsoaledi said they would revisit the “ABC” message “Abstain, Be faithful, Condomise” and check which part was working.“Faithfulness is the main message. It’s a difficult issue but not impossible … We need to target men and concentrate on those responsible for spreading the disease,” Motsoaledi said.“The issue has been discussed with men’s groups. We need to ask nurses to sit down with married couples, including in churches, to speak about the issue of faithfulness. Through medical male circumcision, men are also being counselled on men’s responsibilities.”Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

Rugby’s full story: the Springbok Experience Rugby Museum

first_imgIn a country that is passionate about sport, the Springbok Experience Rugby Museum displays the full story of rugby in South Africa. It opened in Cape Town on 24 September 2013 and has already been nominated for an international accolade. Visitors enjoy the high level of interaction offered within its walls. Through its sculpture, the Springbok Experience Rugby Museum captures one of rugby’s greatest moments: Nelson Mandela and 1995 Bok captain Francois Pienaar shaking hands after South Africa won the World Cup. (Image: Springbok Experience Rugby Museum) • South Africa’s Rugby World Cup journey • South Africa announces 2015 Rugby World Cup squad • Watch: Giving South Africa the #HomeGroundAdvantage • Clive Rice: South African cricketing icon dies at 66 • South Africa to host Commonwealth Games in 2022 Priya PitamberSport is close to many a South African heart. Soccer, rugby, cricket, athletics, among any number of other sporting codes, get the adrenaline racing and the heart pounding. The nation takes immense pride in its sportsmen and women, many of whom excel in their fields.South Africa’s love for rugby has expanded into the Springbok Experience Rugby Museum in Cape Town.“We’re proud of our sport and our heritage, so we wanted to take that out to the public and let people get close to it,” Andy Colquhoun, the general manager of corporate affairs at the South African Rugby Union (Saru), told Cape Town Magazine about the museum.Wild excitementA world away from the stuffy houses of historical facts and figures of old, a huge lure for visitors to the rugby museum is the high level of interactivity.“It delivers a technology-driven ‘wow’ experience for visitors, combining iconic object, interactive games and a rich audio-visual component to tell South Africa’s story through the eyes of its most powerful sport,” informs the museum’s website. The museum is located at Portswood House at the V&A Waterfront in Cape Town. (Image: Springbok Experience Rugby Museum)“As you enter through the Springbok tunnel, moving shadows of players walking beside you, you’re plunged head first into the experience,” reads the Cape Town Magazine website. “A crowd cheers overhead, a giant screen shows rugga (rugby) action before you.”Colquhoun said the “big goal was to have wild excitement and movement and colour, not something static. It’s much more than just display cases and text.” He described the experience as immersive.Travel blogger Tamlyn Amber also praised the interactivity. “There are even fun, rugby ball-shaped facts (which you flip up to read the answer) dotted here and there, that all serve to make for a more enjoyable and engaging experience,” she wrote, after her visit to the museum. “This is the perfect example of a modern museum.”The good and the badThere are artefacts that commemorate rugby’s highlights. Think of the boots Joel Stransky wore when he kicked that famous drop goal; that flag signed by the entire squad when they played New Zealand in 1937; that No. 6 jersey Francois Pienaar wore in 1995.On the other hand, it also keeps in mind the darker aspects of rugby – how it was used as a force of division.“The exhibit effectively weaves together the traditional account of white rugby with the often ignored tale of the development of black and coloured rugby before unity in 1992,” reads the Cape Town Magazine website. “So, even those who think they’re the ultimate fan are likely to learn about a side to the game they never knew existed.”Creating nostalgiaThrough its social media accounts, the museum looks back on players and iconic moments.Can you recall what these guys did for us 20 years ago? #1995reunited @flySAA pic.twitter.com/waosVhylj5 — Springbok Experience (@Bokmuseum) June 24, 2015124 years ago today the Currie Cup was first earned by Griquas. Read the story here. https://t.co/c7SJX1gpbk pic.twitter.com/W44MpPi2Ns — Springbok Experience (@Bokmuseum) July 20, 2015This is the oldest black African club in SA. But when were the founded? Find out here: https://t.co/c7SJX1gpbk pic.twitter.com/vgk7MHrmMV — Springbok Experience (@Bokmuseum) August 6, 2015Recognition and receptionIn 2014, the museum was nominated for the International Award in the UK’s Museum and Heritage Awards.“Visited the museum on our trip from New Zealand,” wrote Brian Damon on the museum’s Facebook page. “What a spectacular experience. Everything was so impressive and made me very nostalgic. A must to see for overseas visitors. Keep up the good work.”Amazing story and history of Springbok rugby @Bokmuseum the game we love will continue to change and I will continue to support with pride. — Gavin Ferreira (@GavinFerreira) August 26, 2015 The museum has a nomination for the International Award in the UK’s Museum and Heritage Awards. (Image: Springbok Experience Rugby Museum)See the Springbok Experience Rugby Museum website for more details about tickets and opening hours.last_img read more

CRPF command shifted back to Chhattisgarh

first_imgThe strategic anti-Naxal operations command headquarters of the Central Reserve Police Force has been shifted from Kolkata to the heart of the Naxal violence-hit Chhattisgarh after 37 jawans of the paramilitary force were killed by Maoists in less than two months. In a May 4 order, the CRPF directed the “immediate” transfer of the central zone command headquarters, roughly seven years after it was shifted from Raipur to Kolkata because of “logistics and connectivity issues”.The new CRPF Director-General Rajeev Rai Bhatnagar has been asked to ensure that the command starts working from Raipur before the high-level meeting of Left Wing Extremism-hit States here on Monday.Kuldiep Singh, Additional Director-General of the CRPF central zone, was air-dashed to Raipur from Kolkata, and he took charge of the command on Friday, sources said.Raised on August 7, 2009, the central zone was tasked with overseeing troops deployment across the States affected by Left Wing Extremism such as West Bengal, Jharkhand, Bihar, Chhattisgarh, Odisha, Madhya Pradesh and Uttar Pradesh. It was moved to Kolkata in July 2010 for want of better rail and air links for the command office, days after the Maoists killed 75 CRPF jawans and a Chhattisgarh policeman in Dantewada on April 6. Review meetTop sources in the security establishment said the Union Home Ministry, after reviewing the April 24 ambush in Sukma district that killed 25 jawans, ordered the CRPF to immediately shift the central zone command to Raipur, without even bothering about the logistics to be put in place. The sources said Mr. Bhatnagar himself oversaw the quick activation of the command in Raipur after attending a meeting of the Unified Command on LWE on May 5, chaired by Chief Minister Raman Singh. He later went to Sukma to make an assessment of the ambush site near Burkapal and held a ‘sainik sammelan’ (a troops meeting) to boost the morale of the jawans at a camp in the forests in south Bastar, a few km from the State’s border with Odisha, Maharashtra, Andhra Pradesh and Telangana.“Over the past two days, the new DG has travelled to the interiors of Sukma and Dantewada, the worst-affected districts. He also visited the ambush site at Bheji in Sukma,” an officer said.last_img read more

Arsenal beats Chelsea 2-1 to seal League Cup final with City

first_img“We might have got our formation wrong … but we came back into it and showed great character,” Arsenal midfielder Jack Wilshere. “We showed our quality going forward.”Unlike Chelsea. A recovery rarely looked on the cards from Antonio Conte’s disjointed side in a derby that exposed the visitors’ shortages in the squad.Chelsea’s attacking threat was sapped by the loss of Willian in the first half with a hamstring problem, and Conte was forced to bring on Ross Barkley for his debut.The new recruit from Everton was lacking sharpness in his first match since being injured May. But Conte was forced to deploy the midfielder as a “false nine” at times. It was little wonder the goal threat was so lacking from a side that won the Premier League last season.Chelsea’s hopes of defending that title faded long ago, with Man City 15 points ahead of the third-place champions. Arsenal is languishing in sixth place but Wenger is still through to a fourth domestic final in five seasons.ADVERTISEMENT View comments 2 ‘newbie’ drug pushers fall in Lucena sting Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa For once, it’s not the FA Cup providing cover for Wenger. Arsenal’s defense of the more prestigious domestic cup ended at the first hurdle in an embarrassing loss to Nottingham Forest earlier this month. But a first trip to the League Cup final since 2011 gives Wenger a chance on Feb. 25 to add the only piece of domestic silverware missing in more than 21 years at Arsenal. Globe Business launches leading cloud-enabled and hardware-agnostic conferencing platform in PH Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Read Next Arsenal’s Shkodran Mustafi controls the ball during the English League Cup semifinal second leg soccer match between Chelsea and Arsenal at the Emirates stadium in London, Wednesday, Jan.24, 2018. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)LONDON — Two fortuitous goals helped Arsenal beat Chelsea 2-1 on Wednesday and seal a League Cup final meeting with Manchester City, providing a glimmer of joy in a gloomy domestic campaign.Both Arsenal goals received a helping hand from Chelsea defender Antonio Ruediger as the semifinal meeting of London rivals came to life after a sterile, scoreless first leg two weeks ago.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:59Sports venues to be ready in time for SEA Games01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC LATEST STORIES Slow and steady hope for near-extinct Bangladesh tortoises Antetokounmpo says Kidd helped him grow into dominant player NEXT BLOCK ASIA 2.0 introduces GURUS AWARDS to recognize and reward industry influencers Chelsea raced into a seventh-minute lead through Eden Hazard but Arsenal quickly fought back. Nacho Monreal’s free header from a corner ricocheted off the heads of Chelsea duo Marcos Alonso and Ruediger before flying into the net in the 12th minute.Arsenal took the lead on the hour when Alexandre Lacazette’s cross was inadvertently diverted by Ruediger into the path of Granit Xhaka, who poked the ball past goalkeeper Willy Caballero.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“In the first half we gave them too much respect, maybe, and we suffered from that,” Arsenal manager Arsene Wenger said. “In the second half we rectified that.”In part thanks to Wenger’s shift to a three-man defense in the second half.last_img read more