Remarks by Governor Wolf at Corporal Bryon Dickson Exit Dedication

first_img October 02, 2015 Remarks Interstate 84 Westbound, Exit Ramp #30Blooming Grove, PATRANSCRIPT:We are here to pay tribute to a hero. Corporal Bryon Dickson gave his life in the service of the people of Pennsylvania. Like his colleagues – including Alex Douglass here today – in the Pennsylvania State Police, he chose to serve his Commonwealth.And like his colleagues, he did this voluntarily. He did it knowing the risks he was taking for himself. And for his family. And his wife Tiffany. And his two sons – Bryon and Adam. And he paid the ultimate priceSo in dedicating this exit ramp to his memory, we are honoring him for his specific act of selfless heroism. But we are also honoring him for the valiant gesture he made to all of us in volunteering for this duty. For being so willing to serve us.This is a good time to reflect on the generosity of all who choose to serve us as public servants. Our society depends on good citizens like Corporal Dickson. People like Corporal Dickson keep us secure in our homes. They protect our neighborhoods. And they make our highways safer. We could not do the things we do in our daily lives if it weren’t for the good people like Corporal Dickson.From this point on, many people will take this exit and see this sign. Many of them will wonder who Corporal Dickson was and what he did. We need to do what we can to make sure we never forget him. We need to make sure we never forget what he did for us. And we need to make sure we never take for granted the noble and important things his fellow public servants do for us everyday.Thank you once again to Corporal Dickson’s family. And thanks to all the members of our Pennsylvania State Police.### SHARE Email Facebook Twittercenter_img Remarks by Governor Wolf at Corporal Bryon Dickson Exit Dedicationlast_img read more

IPE Views: How big can an Apple grow?

first_imgJoseph Mariathasan wonders what, if anything, can check the technology giant’s astonishing growthApple was valued at more than $770bn (€687bn) at its peak in February, making it by far the single-most valuable listed company on the planet. Despite its mammoth size, its chief executive, Tim Cook, announced that it could grow at a rate more akin to a start-up. But how large can a company grow? For some companies, there may be a clear upper limit – how many cans of sweetened fizzy drinks can Coca-Cola sell to a global population, with increasing worries over an epidemic of obesity-related afflictions such as diabetes?That may be a reasonable question to ask of Coca-Cola, but can an analogous question be asked of Apple, with an enormous market, global distribution and a strong brand that, despite being enormous, still has a lot of growth in front of it? Will the limit to Apple’s growth be set when every person on earth has an iPhone?Mega companies were clearly growth companies at an early stage of their lives to reach their gargantuan sizes. But, at what stage should mega-cap mega brands be seen as purely post-growth and value/dividend plays? Deciding when a company such as Apple has reached that position is unclear. The limits to growth are clearly dependent on the business strategy a company chooses to follow. Apple is clearly not a one-trick pony. It is not just a hardware company like Dell, having built an ecosystem around a seamless integration of innovative products and applications way beyond production of commodity hardware. The limits to growth are further away for companies with three key characteristics. First, as famously outlined by Warren Buffet as the companies he favours, are those with an economic moat that protects them against competitors, with a well-known brand name, pricing power and a large portion of market demand. This can provide the ability to grow enormously, but, sometimes, disruptive technologies can overwhelm even the widest moat. Kodak is a classic example, where its domination of photography could not withstand the impact of digital technology. But Apple has become the ultimate consumer brand, with the ability to create interest in any new product or variation of an existing product by just adding the prefix ‘i’.A second economic driver for growth also requires high-quality companies to be able to get better as they get bigger. Bigger does not always mean better, and the banking industry is the prime example of this. Citibank has a global footprint, but its value lies in having a few particularly strong local franchises in countries like Mexico.The insurance industry is another case in point. Life insurance and property and casualty insurance are locally regulated and require capital to be domiciled in local markets, giving few benefits in size, beyond reducing the overall volatility of results. Reducing volatility benefits senior management but not shareholders who could gain equivalent diversification themselves. At the reinsurance level, however, size can bring benefits because of the nature of the business and the size of the transactions. For Apple, the iPhone ecosystem that has grown is a classic example of something that gets better the bigger it grows.The third key characteristic that virtually all mega companies have is the ability to seek customers in the emerging markets.Any constraints to its size are further away for Apple than for most other companies, as it has all the three factors for growth in spades. So what can be the limits to growth for Apple? “The biggest risk for most of the companies we own is anti-trust regulation in the US that will force them to split apart,” said one fund manager on his Apple weighting. “We don’t like that problem, but we certainly prefer it to others we might have!”That is exactly what happened to the old AT&T, which once dominated the US telephone market and was forced to split up in 1982 into seven regional telephone companies – the ‘baby Bells’. That is unlikely to happen to Apple, given that it does not operate in oligopolistic markets and its innovations have attracted rapid and ferocious competition.There appears to be no limits to size for Apple. But then, AT&T, at its height, employed 1m people. Apple employs less than one-tenth of that. A great investment for its shareholders but perhaps also a sign of the problems society faces with the new generation of mega companies that are great at producing returns for shareholders but lousy at producing jobs.Joseph Mariathasan is a contributing editor at IPElast_img read more

Mum who petitioned for abortion law change won’t give up

first_imgNewsTalk ZB 8 July 2016Family First Comment: Good. Neither will weThe mother who petitioned to make it mandatory for parents to know if their children under 16 have an abortion, has pledged not to give up.Hilary Kieft’s 15-year-old daughter had an abortion at boarding school, but Ms Kieft didn’t find out about it until a year later when her daughter attempted suicide.A select committee has rejected the suggestion of mandatory notification, but agreed to strengthen post-abortion counsellingMs Kieft told Mike Hosking she’s disappointed with the decision.“I’m grateful for the minor changes they’re going to do. We still can’t protect our girls. It’s still going to carry on the same. You are going to have girls that are going to try to commit suicide and girls that will commit suicide. How then are we to help them.”Family First director Bob McCoskrie said politicians are taking power away from parents, who should have a protective factor.“The politicians have treated parents as being a potential enemy and to be treated as hostile. For some reason we should only trust professional counsellors and we shouldn’t trust parents.”READ MORE: http://www.newstalkzb.co.nz/news/national/mum-who-petitioned-for-abortion-law-change-wont-give-up/.last_img read more

PSG boss Tuchel explains angry outburst at Leipzig coach

first_img Read Also: PSG fans celebrate UCL final qualification with fireworks “It’s incredible! We are here to play a final and to win,” said the 46-year-old. “We know that Bayern are the favourites, but it’s football. “Obviously, that will be the biggest challenge of my career on Sunday.” FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Promoted ContentPlus-Size Babes Who Will Make Your Heart RaceCan Playing Too Many Video Games Hurt Your Body?11 Most Immersive Game To Play On Your Table Top15 Photos Of Amazingly Beautiful Mutations6 Interesting Ways To Make Money With A DroneCouples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable Way27 Animals That Don’t Need Color To Be CoolMind-Bending Technology That Was Predicted Before It AppearedLaugh, Cry, Or Just Relax With The Best Series Streaming On HBO2020 Tattoo Trends: Here’s What You’ll See This Year10 Characters That Should Be Official Disney Princesses10 Hyper-Realistic 3D Street Art By Odeith Paris Saint-Germain boss Thomas Tuchel has explained his angry outburst at RB Leipzig fitness coach Daniel Behlau after Tuesday’s night Champions League semi-final in Lisbon. PSG reached the European Cup final for the first time in their history by beating Leipzig 3-0 at Estadio da Luz. Goals from Marquinhos, Angel Di Maria and Juan Bernat wrapped up a comfortable victory for the French champions, who can now look forward to a showpiece clash against either Bayern Munich or Lyon on Sunday. Leipzig lost their discipline defensively as they struggled to cope with PSG’s high press and pace in the final third of the pitch, and gave away a total of 24 fouls over the course of the 90 minutes. Tuchel was seen clashing with Behlau shortly after the final whistle, but he attempted to play down the exchange in his post-match interview. The German manager admitted to confronting his Leipzig counterpart Julian Nagelsmann over his tactics, before revealing that the club’s fitness guru attempted to join in their private conversation. “It was between me and Julian,” Tuchel told reporters of the incident. “That is okay between two head coaches but then a third person interfered. “I didn’t like that but it has since been sorted out.” Nagelsmann conceded that Tuchel’s grievances were understandable, while acknowledging the fact that his side had been guilty of several mistimed tackles. “We fouled a lot, you can see that statistically,” the Leipzig head coach said. “That wasn’t planned, we just often came too late into challenges. “He complained because he wanted to protect his players. That’s all normal. “I think we had 34 fouls at the end of the day so you can say something.” Tuchel was delighted to see his team pick up a “deserved” victory against Leipzig, but conceded that Bayern are still the favourites to win this season’s Champions League after their stunning 8-2 quarter-final win over Barcelona. Loading… last_img read more