Hotel Tourism Association says synergy matters in aftermath of road trip

first_img Luxury events for Chicago’s leading travel and media professionals hosted by #TeamTCI Related Items:karen whitt, TCHTA, turks and caicos hotel and tourism association Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 28 May 2015 – Nobody does it like the Turks and Caicos when it comes to overseas fam-trips; and the uniqueness of the Premier’s Investment and Sales Blitz was an idea trumpeted by Hotel and Tourism Association executives who yesterday explained, the synergy of the group which reflected public and private sector interests, made the biggest impression. Karen Whitt, Director, Turks and Caicos Hotel & Tourism Association (TCHTA): “As you would note from the video the highlights are really about the cultural aspect; the heritage, the friendliness and the warmth and the beauty of the destination as opposed to as I would say ‘bricks and mortar’ or anything individual and that as Nikheel (Advani – TCHTA Vice President) stated is one of the unique aspects of this whole initiative.”Whitt continued, “Nobody does this, and this is our second year and we got resounding feeding back everywhere we went that this was one of the most imaginative, creative, unique and quite frankly comfortable and fun atmosphere that anybody attended. All of the participants were overwhelmed with our own warmth, our friendliness, our unity and so forth and I think it made for a more enjoyable experience for all of them and it also gave an opportunity to open their minds to different aspects of what the country has to offer.” Recommended for you Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp TCI: Hard work happens each day, says new President of TC Hotel and Tourism Association; Strategic Action Plan unveiled Turks and Caicos invited to the World Gourmet Summit in Singaporelast_img read more

TCI secures three medals at Flow Carifta Games

first_img Bahamas third, 31 medals Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppCuracao, April 18th, 2017 – Willemstad – Three medals was the finish for the Turks and Caicos Islands during the 47th edition of the Flow Carifta Games which were staged in Curacao.There was a silver medal in the men’s Octathalon by Wickenson Fenelon and two bronze performances; one in the U20 boys 400m won by Colby Jennings and the other in the U20 girls 4x100m relay where the team was Akia Guerrier, Helcyann Sauver, Shavell Sutherland and Sanadia Forbes.#MagneticMediaNews#FlowCariftaGames2017#TCIgets3medalsatCariftaGames Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items:#FlowCariftaGames2017, #magneticmedianews, #TCIgets3medalsatCariftaGamescenter_img Recommended for you TCI secures three medals at Flow Carifta Gameslast_img read more

Texas Schools That Want To Arm Their Employees Have Two Choices

first_imgMarjorie Kamys Cotera/Via The Texas TribuneMock weapons used to train educators in Harrold, Texas. The North Texas school district was the first to allow educators to carry guns on school grounds in 2007.Following a deadly mass shooting at Santa Fe High School, Gov. Greg Abbottrolled out a 40-page plan to keep schools safe. Proposals ranged from beefing up existing mental health screening programs to encouraging voluntary use of gun locks at home, but one component seemed to divide lawmakers, districts and Texas schools: arming school employees.If Texas schools want to arm their staffs, they have two options. One is the Marshal Program, which Abbott proposed using state funds to help schools implement. It allows local school boards to authorize employees to carry a handgun on campus, but they must be specially trained and licensed by the Texas Commission on Law Enforcement. Under the program, armed school personnel can’t carry firearms around students.The other option was already around when then-Gov. Rick Perry signed the Marshall Program into law in 2012. Created by Harrold Independent School District Superintendent David Thweatt in 2007, the Guardian Plan allows local school boards to determine training standards and authorize specific employees to carry on campus at all times.Here are four things to know about the two existing plans that allow school districts to arm their employees:The Marshal Program creates a new kind of peace officerFor districts that choose to adopt the Marshal Program, teachers and other school staff members who undergo the required training are taught to act as armed security officers — or peace officers — in the absence of law enforcement.“The Marshal Program is about creating an entirely new class of peace officers — certified and [Texas Commission on Law Enforcement] trained — who can act in a moment of crisis to disable and neutralize an active shooter,” said state Rep. Jason Villalba, the Dallas Republican who authored the bill that created the Texas school marshal program Abbott wants to expand. “That’s why the program is so starkly different than what Mr. Thweatt calls the guardian plan.”The Guardian Plan, on the other hand, lets school staff carry guns with or without marshal training. It doesn’t train school personnel as peace officers, but lets them carry their weapons as long as they undergo district-specific training and have a handgun license. And it doesn’t have a maximum requirement for how many teachers can be armed, unlike the Marshal Program which lets schools only designate one employee a marshal for every 400 students.Despite the differences in approach for the two plans, they both aim to mitigate tragedies in the event an active shooter comes on campus grounds.“That’s the reason we’re doing it, and I think we can do that because they’re not going to know from where our particular defense is going to come,” Thweatt said.“When [an active shooter] comes to the school, they’re going to get swarmed from multiple directions,” he added. “Armed shooters go where they know there’s going to be little resistance, but if they don’t know where they’re going to get resistance, they’re not going to come to our schools.”Rural districts are more likely to adopt one of the plansMore than 200 of Texas’ 1,000-plus school districts have adopted one of two programs. And a majority of those districts tend to be in rural communities, according to Dax Gonzalez, a spokesman for the Texas Association of School Boards.“Generally speaking, districts with police departments … do not tend to allow staff to carry firearms,” Gonzalez said. “Those 217 are likely smaller, more rural districts that feel they cannot be serviced by local law enforcement quickly enough.”Villalba told POLITICO in February that he believes anywhere between 20 to 50 districts have adopted the marshal program. At least 172 Texas districts have adopted the Guardian Plan.Training and gun storage requirements varyArguably one of the biggest differences between the two programs is different requirements for teachers or other employees who want to carry a gun.Marshals have to receive 80 training hours and keep their firearms under lock and key. The Guardian Plan, on the other hand, lets teachers keep their firearm with them at all times — as long as they have a concealed handgun license and go through 15 to 20 hours of training.It’s worth noting that these requirements could change, however. Abbott previously proposed streamlining the training course under the Marshal Program — which he called “burdensome”— and eliminating the lockbox requirement.Villalba was critical of Abbott’s tweaks to the Marshal Program, saying that parents might be upset if teachers didn’t have to lock up their weapons.But several Texas Republicans, including Jerry Patterson, Texas’ former land commissioner who helped get the state’s concealed handgun law passed in 1995, say the lockbox requirement does more harm than good.“The lockbox requirement is silly. The gun needs to be carried on the person and accessible immediately,” Patterson said. “Not where you have to run to the office, go through a combination and then get the gun. If you carry it all the time, you won’t lose the weapon.”Individuals schools and districts that adopt the Guardian Plan are also allowed to choose their own training requirements. At Harrold ISD, for example, employees who choose to carry go through at least 15 hours of training that includes videos of hostage scenarios and shooting drills. Fayetteville ISD, which adopted the plan in February, doesn’t require a specific amount of firearms training (though most staff do around 20 hours per year). And at Keene ISD, which adopted the Guardian Plan in 2016, Superintendent Ricky Stephens previously told The Texas Tribune he requires staff to undergo 80 hours of initial training and 40 hours annually after that.Only one plan receives money from the stateTo adopt either plan, districts have to find a way to pay for training, purchase firearms and ammunition and, in some cases, a lock box.But only the Marshal Program has received state funding to help pay for those expenses.When the Marshal Program was first signed into law, the state had a grant program in place to help districts cover training costs. But that money ran out and funding has not been reauthorized. That’s why Abbott proposed that the state pay for school marshal training this summer to ease the burden on individual districts.Funding for the Guardian Plan was notably missing from the governor’s proposal, however. Instead of getting approval from the Legislature, authorization for the plan is outlined under the Texas Government Code, which lets certain school district employees who have a handgun license to carry their weapon.Since there’s no legislative recognition of the Guardian Plan, Thweatt said, districts that adopt the plan have to pay for it themselves. Thweatt said Harrold ISD reimburses employees who participate for the cost of guns, ammunition and training.“I’ve never received any funding [from the state] for the Guardian Plan,” Thweatt said.Note: This story was inspired by a discussion on education policy happening now in our Facebook group, This is Your Texas. Sign up here to join the conversation.Disclosure: The Texas Association of School Boards has been a financial supporter of The Texas Tribune, a nonprofit, nonpartisan news organization that is funded in part by donations from members, foundations and corporate sponsors. Financial supporters play no role in the Tribune’s journalism. Find a complete list of them here. Sharelast_img read more

From a movement to a political party

first_imgWouldn’t it be nice to know more about the journey of the Chief Minister from an IIT student to a political leader and youth icon that led to the birth of a new political party? Bloomsbury India launched the book ‘Arvind Kejriwal and the Aam Aadmi Party: An Inside Look’ in the presence of the author, Pran Kurup, and the Chief Minister of New Delhi, Arvind Kejriwal at the national Capital recently. The event was also presided over by Deputy CM, Manish Sisodia who unveiled the book. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The book provides a fresh and unique perspective on Arvind Kejriwal and the Aam Aadmi party (AAP) through keen observations and first-hand insights of an active AAP volunteer and close personal friend of Kejriwal from his undergraduate days at IIT Kharagpur. The book ultimately looks at the aftermath of AAP’s most recent power struggle, and the road ahead for AAP and its role in Indian politics.At the event, Arvind Kejriwal, said, “I am very happy to be at the launch of this book. Pran is a dear friend and a steadfast believer in AAP and my work over the years. I am happy to be here in the presence of my supporters and well-wishers at the launch of this book which is an excellent chronicle of AAP’s journey to bring politics back to our people. A keen observer of events with impressive analytical abilities Pran has been able to look at AAP’s journey through a lens of objectivity, providing his own perspective and suggestions for improvement at the same time. I wish him the very best.” Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixPran Kurup, author, added, “This is a book for people across the world hungering to know more about Arvind Kejriwal, Aam Aadmi Party (AAP), and their meteoric rise in Indian politics. My book shows the true nature of Arvind and AAP, which is to have faith and inspire people into believing that they can do whatever they set their sights on, which is reflective of the young start-up culture our country is witnessing today. Startups are about faith and belief. Arvind has managed over the years to instill this belief and faith in scores of young men and women who play a critical role in both the party and in governance” Rajiv Beri, Managing Director, Bloomsbury India, said, “This book is one of the first few titles we have published in our strategic push towards bringing political and contemporary books to the market.”The launch also included a panel discussion between Pran Kurup, Raghav Chadha, Spokesperson and Treasurer of Delhi Unit of AAP; Ashutosh, journalist-turned-politician and spokesperson of AAP; and Dilip Pandey, Convenor of the Delhi Unit of AAP that gave the audience insights into the past, present and future of the Aam Aadmi Party. The discussion touched upon a variety of topics including the act of writing a book about a friend, the importance of objectivity while doing so and the turn of events in 2014. The session was moderated by Abhinandan Sekhri, Co-founder and CEO, Newslaundry.last_img read more