Ibrahimovic gives his verdict on WengerAC Milan rumours

first_imgZlatan Ibrahimovic ruled out the prospect of Arsene Wenger taking charge of AC Milan as he won’t fancy the challenge involvedThe former Arsenal boss has been linked with a surprise move to AC Milan due to his connection with new chief executive Ivan Gazidis, who left the Gunners in October.But former Milan star Ibrahimovic can’t imagine any scenario that sees Wenger ever head off to the San Siro.“I think it’s more likely that I’ll come back to Milan than Arsene Wenger will go there,” Ibrahimovic told L’Equipe.“I don’t think he wants to go to Italy and face that challenge. Milan is not an easy challenge.”The Swedish striker enjoyed a stellar first season in the MLS with new club LA Galaxy.Cristiano Ronaldo, JuventusSerie A Betting: Match-day 3 Stuart Heath – September 14, 2019 Considering there is a number of perfect starts so early in the Serie A season, as well as a few surprisingly not-so perfect ones….Ibrahimovic managed 22 goals and seven assists in 26 MLS games, but was unable to help Galaxy reach a playoff spot.The 37-year-old is uncertain over what the future holds for him.“I don’t know what I’m going to do, I know that a lot of European clubs are interested, but I’m happy here,” Ibrahimovic added.“I love my life here and my family do too.“And I need a challenge, a reason to keep playing: I don’t want to go to a club just because I’m Zlatan Ibrahimovic.“I want to go to make a difference. That’s what I’ve always done, everywhere.”last_img read more

Quebecor World Sells European Operations

first_imgQuebecor’s European operations produce magazines, catalogs, retail inserts, direct mail products and directories. They include 17 printing and related facilities employing approximately 3,500 people in Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Spain and Sweden.The sale is not subject to the approval of either Quebecor World’s or HHBV’s shareholders. The only condition to closing, according to Quebecor, is court approval. Quebecor World has agreed to sell its European operations to a group of Netherlands-based investors, the Hombergh/De Pundert Group, for more than $200 million. The transaction is expected to close in June.According to Quebecor World CEO Jacques Mallette, the sale is “an important step in our restructuring activities that we believe should enable us to exit creditor protection in North America as a stronger player in our industry.”Earlier this year, Quebecor filed for bankruptcy protection and announced that it had entered into a $1 billion financing deal with Credit Suisse and Morgan Stanley. Under the terms of the acquisition, HHBV has deposited nearly $80 million in escrow to be released to Quebecor once the deal is finalized. HHBV also will assume about $100 million of net debt, and a $33.5 million five-year note bearing interest at 7 percent per year, which will be payable to Quebecor World following finalization of the deal.last_img read more

GM in talks to sell Lordstown to Workhorse for EV pickups while

first_img More From Roadshow Enlarge ImageThe last Chevy Cruze to roll off the line came from Lordstown on March 6. General Motors When General Motors in November announced a Thanos snap’s worth of vehicle cuts, plant idles and layoffs, there were a lot of unanswered questions. This week, GM seeks to provide at least some closure with news of a potential sale and the addition of jobs in an area that was affected by The Decimation.General Motors announced on Wednesday that it is in talks to sell its Lordstown Complex in Ohio. GM is currently discussing the idea with Workhorse Group, a company that has supplied green vehicles to UPS and hopes to offer even more electrified work vehicles in the future. But the complex wouldn’t be sold directly to Workhorse, per se — instead, Workhorse’s founder is leading an independent entity that would purchase the facility, with Workhorse commanding a minority interest in said business entity.So, what’ll be built there? According to Steve Burns, Workhorse’s founder, it’ll be new, electric and a truck: “The first vehicle we would plan to build if we were to purchase the Lordstown Complex would be a commercial electric pickup, blending Workhorse’s technology with Lordstown’s manufacturing expertise,” Burns said in a statement. GM’s statement says the facility could start being converted to produce Workhorse vehicles as soon as all parties come to an agreement, which has not been finalized as of this writing.In 2018, Workhorse and UPS announced that the manufacturer would supply UPS with 50 plug-in hybrid delivery vans. Workhorse has also unveiled the W-15 electric pickup, which it brought to CES 2018, toting a gasoline range extender that aims to minimize charging downtime on the job. It’s also unveiled the N-Gen, a last-mile electric delivery van that packs an optional delivery drone.At the same time, GM said it was investing approximately $700 million in its other Ohio manufacturing facilities, which the automaker said should create about 450 new manufacturing jobs. The DMAX facility in Moraine will start building more diesel engines for next-gen heavy-duty pickups, the Toledo Transmission plant will boost production of GM’s 10-speed automatic transmission and its Parma Metal Center will increase stamped-part production. The automaker noted that hourly employees at unallocated plants (like Lordstown) can request a transfer to one of these new jobs, and that more than 1,350 employees have already taken transfers to other plants with union representation. Preview • 2019 Chevy Colorado ZR2 Bison: An off-road animal Post a comment 0 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better Check out the aggressive W-15 electric pickup truck at CES 2018 11 Photos 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous Tags More about 2019 Chevrolet Colorado 2WD Ext Cab 128.3″ Base 2019 Kia K900: The best luxury sedan you’ve never heard of Share your voice Car Industry Electric Cars Trucks Future Cars General Motorslast_img read more

Texas School Districts Struggled To Use Law That Could Stave Off State

first_img Share For school districts with chronically failing campuses, a recently passed law that allows them a reprieve from state sanctions was supposed to be a lifeline. A year on, less than a tenth of those districts are on track to take advantage of it.About 60 Texas schools in more than two dozen districts were considered failing for four or more years in 2017, putting them at risk for being shut down by the state next year. Several of those school districts considered using Senate Bill 1882, which allowed them to partner with outside organizations to turn those schools around and get an extension from harsh state penalties, but only five are currently on track to do so.Others had trouble meeting the tight application deadline or faced backlash from school communities that protested giving up the management of their low-performing schools, many of which are located in majority Hispanic and black neighborhoods.“They’ve taken on a new process, challenging because it is new, and they’ve done it in a really hard context of a long-term, low-performing campus,” said David Anderson, policy analyst at Raise Your Hand Texas, which has been following the implementation of this law. “It’s sort of a perfect storm in the sense of hard to do.”The Texas Education Agency last week made a first round of decisions on six districts’ partnership applications, rejecting one district’s proposal, approving another’s contingent on technical changes and requesting interviews with the proposed partner organizations for the last four. It plans to make final decisions before the next school year begins.Three years ago, Texas passed a strict law intended to force districts to take responsibility for bolstering schools that failed to meet standards by setting deadlines for improvement and imposing sanctions on those that didn’t meet them. After a slow phase-in, the state is poised next school year to impose those sanctions, which include forcibly shutting down schools considered failing for more than three years or taking over the school boards of those districts.SB 1882 at first seemed like it could offer some help for school administrators in need of more time to implement fixes: districts that partnered with a nonprofit, charter organization or university to overhaul failing schools could receive a two-year reprieve from state penalties as well as additional state funding.But the process was harder than it seemed. “People go through a couple of stages of this where they initially say, ‘Oh my, that’s a bunch of money.’ Then they see what they really have to do to make it work, and that is daunting,” Anderson said.Dallas ISD Superintendent Michael Hinojosa said he was unwilling to wait months to decide how to proceed with three schools that had been listed as failing for four or five years. “We would be insulting your intelligence as well as any potential partners to have them consider something and have a plan in by March 1,” he told board members in November, according to the Dallas Morning News. The TEA released the guidelines in late February and March, and districts faced an April 30 final deadline to submit their applications.Some Dallas ISD board members and community members also didn’t want to give up the reins of their schools, said board member Miguel Solis. Under SB 1882, districts are required to sign contracts giving the charter group or university authority over the schools’ operations and employees.“The fear from some of my colleagues was that the innovation that we are actually doing related to school choice in Dallas ISD would have been at risk of being taken away from the district’s control and basically given away to universities to run as they pleased,” Solis said. Instead, Dallas ISD officials are planning to close and consolidate some schools and use the district’s own program to try to turn struggling schools around by paying high-performing teachers stipends to work at them.Solis argued the state should be spending more money on innovative programs districts already have in place. “We have data that shows this is a more effective innovation strategy,” he said.Victoria ISD Superintendent Robert Jaklich proposed partnering with local University of Houston at Victoria to manage two schools that had been failing for five years. It would have received an estimated additional $1,921 per student — $2.1 million total — from the state each year of a proposed three-year partnership.But he couldn’t get the contract together in time and so got a terse letter from the state last week saying his request for an extension on state sanctions had been denied. Jaklich isn’t too worried about the rejection: he’s positive that school leaders have managed to turn those schools around, and that they’ll receive passing marks in August’s accountability ratings, largely based on standardized test scores. “We’re extremely confident that all of them are going to make it,” he said.Not all school administrators are as optimistic. Houston ISD has been the key example for the high stakes of the upcoming state penalties, with 10 failing schools putting Texas’ largest district at risk of state takeover. In a disastrous board meeting that ended in multiple arrests, Houston ISD proposed applying for a turnaround partnership to hand over the management of its schools to a charter group called Energized for STEM.Community members turned out in protest, furious at the drastic proposal on a tight timeline, and district officials and board members backed away from the proposal.Houston ISD has another option for a reprieve. It could receive a waiver from its state ratings this year because of the massive financial and phsyical destruction it suffered under Hurricane Harvey — which would delay the sanctions another year.Anderson thinks more districts will be poised to apply for partnerships next year, with more time to plan, and especially as schools continue to trigger potential state takeover. “The campuses people weren’t so concerned about because they were three-year low-performing, if they turn into four-year [low-performing campuses] in August, you have this whole discussion again,” he said.Disclosure: Raise Your Hand Texas and the University of Houston have been financial supporters of The Texas Tribune, a nonprofit, nonpartisan news organization that is funded in part by donations from members, foundations and corporate sponsors. Financial supporters play no role in the Tribune’s journalism. Find a complete list of them here.last_img read more