Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission Awards Scholarship to Eight Students

first_imgRobert G. Berger Memorial Scholarship FundThe Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission announced June 18 that eight children of Commission employees have been awarded scholarships through the Robert G. Berger Memorial Scholarship Fund. The fund is supported by contributions from the Berger family, employees and retirees of WSSC.Approximately $10,000 in scholarships was awarded to the following students:Andrea Crowe         Lock Haven UniversityDaniel Crowe           Lock Haven UniversitySanchita Gupta        University of VirginiaAmber Kelly             Salisbury UniversityThomas Lilly, III       Georgia Institute of TechnologyTheresa Russell      University of Maryland College ParkNatelie Tobery         Shepherd UniversityChristina Venanzi    Stevenson UniversityThe Robert G. Berger Memorial Scholarship Fund serves as an opportunity for WSSC to support higher education. Formerly known as the WSSC Employee Scholarship Fund, it was renamed to honor the memory of Commissioner Robert G. Berger upon his passing in April 2003. Commissioner Berger was appointed to the Commission from Montgomery County in 1993 and served until 2001. A graduate of Brown University and Harvard Law School, he was a tremendous advocate of higher education and played a pivotal role in creating the WSSC Scholarship Fund.last_img read more

Swedish public broadcaster SVT is to offer its ent

first_imgSwedish public broadcaster SVT is to offer its entire broadcast output free of charge online. SVT CEO Eva Hamilton revealed the plan to offer all content online in an opinion piece in newspaper Dagens Nyheter.Hamilton said the launch of SVT’s channels online was likely to take place in February.According to press reports, Radiotjänst, the agency responsible for collecting the country’s SEK2,076 (€240) annual TV licence fee, has confirmed that the move will mean it will start collecting fees from people who own computers and tablet devices but not TV.Hamilton said that this would make little difference in practice, as a law was already in place that required anybody who could receive a TV channel on a device to pay the fee, something that has applied since last year when commercial broadcaster TV4 began broadcasting its channels on the web.last_img read more

Media services firm RR Media has acquired Israelb

first_imgMedia services firm RR Media has acquired Israel-based SatLink Communications for US$19 million in a bid to “increase scale and expand service capabilities.”SatLink is a global provider of content distribution, management and playout services. RR Media said that, with the deal, it will integrate the companies’ networks, expanding its global content distribution network and content management footprint. “This acquisition, along with the recent acquisition of ESS and the previous acquisitions made in recent years, form essential elements of our strategy to increase the scale of the company expanding our global presence, growing our smart global distribution network and content management services, expanding our service offering, enhancing our mix of premium customers and leveraging world-wide industry expertise,” said Avi Cohen, CEO of RR Media.“This acquisition is expected to contribute to our bottom line in 2015 and beyond. We have watched SatLink’s accomplishments over the years and we are extremely happy to have SatLink become part of RR Media.”RR Media said that as a result of the takeover it expects to generate incremental revenue of approximately US$25 million and adjusted EBITDA of $5 million in 2016.The business and operational integration is planned to be completed by the end of this year.last_img read more

In This Issue A sticky question… Budget negoti

first_imgIn This Issue.*A sticky question… *Budget negotiations stall… *BOJ to announce more stimulus… *Gold and Silver reverse…And, Now, Today’s Pfennig For Your Thoughts!Is all debt bad???Good day. I was met with the above question as I walked through the door last night.  As I came home from work my 14 year old asked me the answer to the question ‘Is all debt bad?’.  My daughter, Lauren, is in the middle of exams and she was upset that she had missed this question on a civics exam.  She occasionally reads the Pfennig, and has listened in on enough of our dinner conversations to realize that much of the world is currently in a debt crisis.  So when she was presented with a true false question regarding debt, she answered True – all debt is bad. From reading your comments about yesterday’s Pfennig, many of you would have given Lauren extra credit, but unfortunately I had to let her know that her answer is technically wrong.  As I explained to Lauren, not all debt is bad.  There are times when a country, company, or individual needs to borrow money.  Debt can be used to fund all sorts of very good projects, and keeps economies rolling through slowdowns.  But debt is meant to eventually be paid off, not accumulated in a never ending cycle. So yes, Lauren missed that question on her civics exam; but in a way I am glad she missed it as I don’t think it is a bad thing that my daughter is a bit scared of debt.  I just wish some of our leaders in Washington would match my daughter’s concern over debt accumulation. But enough of my dinner table economics lecture, let’s get to the currency markets.It was a ‘risk off’ day in the currency markets, but the moves were dampened by the holiday thinned trading desks.  The yen finally reversed its recent sell off, and the dollar also climbed a bit as US lawmakers moved further apart on a budget deal.  President Obama told business leaders that budget talks have regressed and accused Republicans of wasting a lot of time with political posturing (perhaps a bit of the pot calling the kettle black). Today we have an absolute plethora of data which will be released here in the US.  We start off the morning with GDP projections for the 3rd quarter which are expected to show the US economy grew just under 3% compared to previous estimates of 2.7% growth.  It is Thursday, so we will also get the weekly jobs numbers which are projected to show another 360k workers filed for jobless claims last week.  Continuing claims are predicted to have increased to 3200k in another indication the labor market will be very slow to recover.  This employment data will be followed up with existing home sales and leading indicators.  Yesterday’s data showed a drop in Housing starts (down 3% MOM) but an increase in building permits (3.6%MOM).  Definitely some conflicting data, so the existing home sales may help give investors a better picture of the housing recovery.  Finally, the leading indicators are expected to show a decrease of .2% during November following an increase of the same amount in the previous month.The yen had dropped for three straight days as investors worried the new Prime Minister would successfully push for more aggressive rounds of stimulus.  The BOJ ends their two day meeting today, and are expected to announce additional stimulus moves. Adding to the worries regarding the yen was a Japanese government report released yesterday which showed the trade deficit widened in November. Traditionally Japan has run a trade surplus, and the deficits have caused investors to re evaluate their demand expectations for the yen.  A country which runs a trade surplus creates demand for their currency, while trade deficits will typically drive the demand for (and value of) a currency lower. The yen has bounced back a bit this morning as some investors apparently believe the three day selloff was overdone.The euro continued to climb through most of the morning yesterday, moving just above $1.33 for a short period.  But the renewed worries out of Washington caused it to give back some of these gains and it is now holding in the $1.32 handle.  I had a reader scold me for not writing more on the Swiss Franc and its recent rise.  I haven’t mentioned the Swiss franc simply because of its peg to the Euro.  So as the euro moves, so will the Swiss franc.  The 3.44% increase in the euro over the past month has been matched with a 3.36% increase in the Swiss franc vs. the US$.  As long as the Swiss National Bank defends the peg to the euro, there is really no need to talk about the Swiss as it is tied to the euro.  Now it will certainly be interesting if/when the peg is relaxed, and you can bet Chuck or I will inform all of you when we start hearing any indications of that.  Until then, readers can simply watch the euro.Several readers asked me to comment on the big drop in gold prices over the past couple of days.  Many of you pointed me toward various manipulation theories, but I think there are two possible explanations for the recent drop in prices.  First, there was improved confidence that a compromise would be reached between the two parties over the fiscal cliff.  As we approached the year end, demand for gold climbed as investors looked for an asset they could hide in if/when our leaders in D.C. took us over the cliff.  A second possible explanation is year-end selling due to the probable increase in tax rates.  Silver has had a nice 12 percent rise this year, and gold is up 6.72% so investors could just be taking these gains off the table before 2013.  By the way, this will be the 12th consecutive year of gains in the price of gold. No matter what caused the selloff, both metals rebounded yesterday as concerns over the fiscal cliff agreement returned.  Negotiations in Washington have deteriorated, so my first theory on what caused the recent sell-off has been flipped and gold is now climbing again.  Most of the gold refineries are also going into a end of year / holiday shutdown, so additional supply will be limited over the next couple of weeks.On a longer term basis, I am confident that demand for precious metals will be increasing.  The fiscal problems facing many of the Western nations will shake global investor confidence in ‘fiat’ currencies.  And my thoughts on the ‘rise of the Chinese consumer’ also support higher metals prices.  As consumers in both China and India see even a slight increase in disposable income, a percentage of that income will likely be invested into the precious metals markets.  Gold and Silver are much more accepted as forms of wealth storage in the Asian cultures, so any increase in disposable incomes should lead toward an increase in demand.  Just another reason I think precious metals should be a part of every investors diversified portfolio.And then there was this. The Fed’s holding of interest rates at record low levels have had a very different impact on two separate classes of investors.  A story I spotted on Bloomberg this morning pointed out the dramatic divergence between savers and professional investors.  The story, written by Bob Ivry starts out with this line “Deepak Narula’s mortgage-bond fund is up 39 percent this year.  George Sanchez’s monthly annuity payout is down 41 percent.”  Ivry goes on to explain some of the unintended consequences of the FOMC’s interest rate policies. “The near-zero interest rate the Federal Reserve charges financial firms, as well as securities purchases that will balloon the central bank’s balance sheet to almost $4 trillion next year, have made it easier for Narula’s $1.6 billion fund to thrive and more difficult for Sanchez, a former college library director, to enjoy retirement.”The story includes an excellent quote by Nobel Prize-winning Columbia University economist Joseph E. Stiglitz: “Monetary policy has been indirectly, surreptitiously helping the top and hurting the bottom.”  Stiglitz blames the Fed policies for starving money-savers of income and boosting certain asset prices, widening the gap between the rich and the rest of the country.  Bob Ivry has written some excellent pieces on the Fed, and I always enjoy reading his take on things. To recap. Debt is not always bad, but the constant accumulation of debt is! Budget negotiations hit a snag, sending investors back toward safe havens.  Today will be a big day for data here in the US markets, but holiday thinned trading desks should keep volatility down. The BOJ is expected to announce more stimulus, but the yen has already been adjusted for the expected increase in supply. Gold reversed its recent sell off, and started moving back up on worries on the budget negotiations. And the FOMC’s zero rate policies have caused a divergence in returns for savers vs. professionals.Currencies today 12/20/12. American Style: A$ $1.0493, kiwi .8343, C$ $1.0113, euro 1.3255, sterling 1.6262, Swiss $1.0974. European Style: rand 8.5159, krone 5.5498, SEK 6.5114, forint 216.0, zloty 3.0708, koruna 19.0335, RUB 30.6835, JPY 84.10, SGD 1.2184, HKD 7.7501, INR 54.8544, China 6.2306, pesos 12.7715, BRL 2.0619, Dollar Index 79.163, Oil $89.88, 10-year 1.78%, Silver $31.22, Gold $1,670.62, and Platinum $1591.24.That’s it for today. Congratulations to Antione Lawrence as his lovely wife Brooke gave birth to a beautiful baby girl yesterday.  It is the couple’s first child, and the first of three babies on their way for the WorldMarkets desk (Both Mikes, Harrell and Meyer, are also expecting).  We anxiously awaited the news yesterday morning after Antione let us know he and Brooke were headed into the hospital.  Both baby and mom are doing fine, and I’m sure proud papa Antione is beaming!  Sounds like we could see our first snow of the year, it is currently raining but the temps are supposed to drop and the rain should turn to snow later today.  I will wrap up today’s Pfennig on that great news.  I hope everyone has a great day, and thanks for reading the Pfennig!Chris Gaffney, CFA Vice President EverBank World Markets 1-800-926-4922 1-314-647-3837last_img read more

​Estrogens found in cows milk shown to pose no risk to adult

first_img Source:Estrogens in cows’ milk are unlikely to pose a threat to adult health. The majority of studies we reviewed concluded that the concentrations of estrogens found naturally in milk are too low to pose a risk to reproductive health or cancer development in adults. However, studies are lacking that look at any harmful effects of hormones from cows’ milk on baby and child development and health.”Professor Gregor Majdic, Co-author By Sally Robertson, B.Sc.Oct 26 2018Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)A review of studies looking into the health effects of consuming estrogen-containing cows’ milk has found that the milk is likely to be safe for human consumption.Image Credit: Alexander Chaikin / ShutterstockThe review suggests that the level of estrogens that occur naturally in cows’ milk are too low to pose a risk to adults and that people do not need to be concerned.The paper, entitled “Estrogens in consumer milk – is there a risk to human reproductive health?”, was published today in the European Journal of Endocrinology.The female sex hormone estrogen is present in cows’ milk and with more than 160 million tons of the milk produced in the EU in 2016 alone, it is a common component of our diet.Intensive farming has been shown to increase the amount of estrogen in cows’ milk which has raised concerns about the safety of drinking it.Potential adverse health effects include an increased risk of hormone-related cancers, reduced fertility, and abnormal fetal development.The current study reviewed the evidence available from more than a dozen analyses of rodents and humans looking at the effects that drinking the milk may have on the risk of cancer development and on fertility.Professor Gregor Majdic and Professor Tomaz Snoj from the University of Ljubljana in Slovenia found that the majority of studies where rats ingested milk or milk-derived estrogens, showed no differences in cancer risk or reproductive health.Some studies did report changes in reproductive health and other adverse health effects, but in those studies, the level of estrogen assessed far exceeded the level that people would usually ingest.Some studies have also suggested that drinking the milk can affect the level of growth hormone in children, but it is not clear whether the link is related to consuming estrogens or whether there are any other adverse health effects.last_img read more

German utility EON to cut 5000 jobs in RWE megadeal

German energy giant EON to buy RWE subsidiary Innogy © 2018 AFP German utility EON on Monday said it plans to cut up to 5,000 jobs as part of its takeover of the renewables unit Innogy from rival RWE, in a deal that will redraw the country’s energy landscape. Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. In a joint statement, EON and RWE said they planned to complete their asset swap transaction, which surprised investors when it was unveiled this weekend, “by the end of 2019”.EON said it expects the Innogy takeover to generate some 600 to 800 million euros in savings annually from 2022, but warned that the “integration process” will lead to “a reduction of a maximum of 5,000 jobs” out of a total of around 70,000 jobs.”At the same time, EON anticipates to create thousands of new jobs in the coming decade,” the statement added.The ultimate goal of the transaction is to allow EON to focus on retail customers and on managing energy networks, essentially buying and selling electricity, while RWE will specialise in generating power from fossil fuels and renewables.The complicated arrangement comes amid huge upheaval in the sector as Europe’s top economy switches from conventional to renewable power under the government’s so-called “Energiewende” or “energy transition”.The deal would first see EON acquire RWE’s 76.8 percent stake in Innogy, valuing the clean-energy spin-off at some 22 billion euros.Pending the green light from financial regulators, EON then intends to make a voluntary takeover offer to Innogy’s minority shareholders from “early May”, offering 40 euros per share.RWE for its part would gain an effective participation of 16.67 percent in EON—turning the one-time competitor into EON’s largest shareholder.The next step of the deal would see RWE take control of EON’s renewables business, including Innogy’s renewables, its gas storage business, its stake in Austrian energy supplier Kelaq and EON’s minority stakes in two nuclear power plants. In return, RWE will make a cash payment of 1.5 billion euros to EON.Innogy’s energy networks and customer base would remain with EON.The transaction is still subject to regulatory approval.The deal would make RWE “a leading European electricity producer,” according to the statement, as the firm becomes Europe’s third-largest renewables producer while also hanging on to gas and coal-fired power plants to ensure “security of supply” despite their harmful impact on the environment.EON meanwhile said it would “focus entirely on meeting the demands of its around 50 million customers across Europe”, and pledged to look into novel climate protection solutions—such as the faster roll-out of charging stations for electric cars.Merkel welcomes dealChancellor Angela Merkel welcomed the companies’ manoeuvres earlier Monday, saying she was “confident” both EON and RWE were working to find “the best ways” to assure “the supply of sustainable energy” and respond to the country’s energy shift.Germany’s energy market has been rapidly transformed since Merkel announced a phase-out of nuclear power after Japan’s 2011 Fukushima disaster.Under the “energy transition”, Germany has raised the share of solar, wind and other renewables to about one third of electricity production.As wholesale power prices have dropped, the big utilities have been forced into major restructuring.In response to those challenges, EON spun off its fossil fuel operations and invested heavily in renewables, while RWE remains the biggest power producer and still operates major coal-fired plants.In a separate statement Monday, EON unveiled its 2017 financial results, which showed adjusted net profits jumping 58 percent year-on-year to 1.4 billion euros.Operating, or underlying, profit came in at 3.1 billion euros, while EON was also able to trim its massive debt from 19.7 billion last October to 19.2 billion euros.RWE is due to announce its results on Tuesday. Citation: German utility EON to cut 5,000 jobs in RWE mega-deal (2018, March 12) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-03-german-eon-jobs-rwe-mega-deal.html RWE is selling German energy renewables unit Innogy to EON in a complex deal that will redraw Germany’s energy landscape read more

Did We Mishear Neil Armstrongs Famous First Words on the Moon

first_imgOn July 20, 1969, an estimated 650 million people watched in suspense as Neil Armstrong descended a ladder towards the surface of the Moon. As he took his first steps, he uttered words that would be written into history books for generations to come: “That’s one small step for man. One giant leap for mankind.” Or at least that’s how the media reported his words.Headbutting Tiny Worms Are Really, Really LoudThis rapid strike produces a loud ‘pop’ comparable to those made by snapping shrimps, one of the most intense biological sounds measured at sea.Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Why Is It ‘Snowing’ Salt in the Dead Sea?01:53 facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65950-neil-armstrong-first-words-on-moon.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0000:3500:35  But Armstrong insisted that he actually said, “That’s one small step for a man.” In fact, in the official transcript of the Moon landing mission, NASA transcribes the quote as “that’s one small step for (a) man.” As a linguist, I’m fascinated by mistakes between what people say and what people hear. In fact, I recently conducted a study on ambiguous speech, using Armstrong’s famous quote to try to figure out why and how we successfully understand speech most of the time, but also make the occasional mistake. Our extraordinary speech-processing abilities Despite confusion over Armstrong’s words, speakers and listeners have a remarkable ability to agree on what is said and what is heard. When we talk, we formulate a thought, retrieve words from memory and move our mouths to produce sound. We do this quickly, producing, in English, around five syllables every second. The process for listeners is equally complex and speedy. We hear sounds, which we separate into speech and non-speech information, combine the speech sounds into words, and determine the meanings of these words. Again, this happens nearly instantaneously, and errors rarely occur. These processes are even more extraordinary when you think more closely about the properties of speech. Unlike writing, speech doesn’t have spaces between words. When people speak, there are typically very few pauses within a sentence. Yet listeners have little trouble determining word boundaries in real time. This is because there are little cues — like pitch and rhythm — that indicate when one word stops and the next begins. But problems in speech perception can arise when those kinds of cues are missing, especially when pitch and rhythm are used for non-linguistic purposes, like in music. This is one reason why misheard song lyrics — called “mondegreens” — are common. When singing or rapping, a lot of the speech cues we usually use are shifted to accommodate the song’s beat, which can end up jamming our default perception process. But it’s not just lyrics that are misheard. This can happen in everyday speech, and some have wondered if this is what happened in the case of Neil Armstrong. Studying Armstrong’s mixed signals Over the years, researchers have tried to comb the audio files of Armstrong’s famous words, with mixed results. Some have suggested that Armstrong definitely produced the infamous “a,” while others maintain that it’s unlikely or too difficult to tell. But the original sound file was recorded 50 years ago, and the quality is pretty poor. So can we ever really know whether Neil Armstrong uttered that little “a”? Perhaps not. But in a recent study, my colleagues and I tried to get to the bottom of this. First, we explored how similar the speech signals are when a speaker intends to say “for” or “for a.” That is, could a production of “for” be consistent with the sound waves, or acoustics, of “for a,” and vice-versa? So we examined nearly 200 productions of “for” and 200 productions of “for a.” We found that the acoustics of the productions of each of these tokens were nearly identical. In other words, the sound waves produced by “He bought it for a school” and “He bought one for school” are strikingly similar. But this doesn’t tell us what Armstrong actually said on that July day in 1969. So we wanted to see if listeners sometimes miss little words like “a” in contexts like Armstrong’s phrase. We wondered whether “a” was always perceived by listeners, even when it was clearly produced. And we found that, in several studies, listeners often misheard short words, like “a.” This is especially true when the speaking rate was as slow as Armstrong’s. In addition, we were able to manipulate whether or not people heard these short words just by altering the rate of speech. So perhaps this was a perfect storm of conditions for listeners to misperceive the intended meaning of this famous quote. The case of the missing “a” is one example of the challenges in producing and understanding speech. Nonetheless, we typically perceive and produce speech quickly, easily and without conscious effort. A better understanding of this process can be especially useful when trying to help people with speech or hearing impairments. And it allows researchers to better understand how these skills are learned by adults trying to acquire a new language, which can, in turn, help language learners develop more efficient strategies. Fifty years ago, humanity was changed when Neil Armstrong took those first steps on the Moon. But he probably didn’t realize that his famous first words could also help us better understand how humans communicate. [Sign up for The Conversation’s newsletter to get insight each day] This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 minute and see why everyone is addictedVikings: Free Online GameUndoLCR Health SupplementTop Doctor Explains How A Confused Metabolism Could Cause You Do Gain WeightLCR Health SupplementUndoClassmatesSearch For Any High School Yearbook, It’s Free!ClassmatesUndoPrimeSolarQuotesCalifornia Signs Solar Law Helping Homeowners Save Hundreds A Month.PrimeSolarQuotesUndoGundry MD Total Restore SupplementU.S. Cardiologist: It’s Like a Pressure Wash for Your InsidesGundry MD Total Restore SupplementUndoUltimate Pet Nutrition Pet SupplementsIf Your Indoor Cat Vomits (Do This Every Day)Ultimate Pet Nutrition Pet SupplementsUndo Melissa Michaud Baese-Berk, Associate Professor of Linguistics, University of Oregonlast_img read more

Hassan breaks womens mile world record on emotional night

first_imgMONACO (Reuters) – Sifan Hassan of the Netherlands broke the 23-year-old women’s mile world record on Friday when she clocked four minutes 12.33 seconds in a race dedicated to former American runner Gabe Grunewald, who died from cancer last month at the age of 32. Hassan, 26, initially looked to be off the record pace in the rarely-run event but finished strongly to edge the 4:12.56 set by Russia’s Svetlana Masterkova in Zurich in 1996.It was a fitting performance in an event named the “Brave like Gabe” Mile. There was a tribute to Grunewald on the big screens at the stadium before the race and once it was underway, Hassan, who moved to the Netherlands after leaving Ethiopia as a refugee when she was 15, was always in control.“I knew I could run fast, but the first 800 was a bit slow, so after that I wasn’t thinking it would be a world record,” said Hassan, who took more than two seconds off her previous best for the distance. Athletics 08 Jul 2019 Prabudass singing in the rain as he breaks national record Related News Athletics 06 Jul 2019 Sizzling Lyles becomes fourth fastest man ever at 200m {{category}} {{time}} {{title}}center_img Other Sport 12 May 2019 Other Sports: Athletics – Brazil stun U.S. in 4x100m final on day of upsets at IAAF World Relays Related News “When I crossed the line I was so surprised,” she added after clocking a 62 seconds final lap.”After you run the last 400 like that, and set a world record, it gives you so much confidence over 5,000m.”I want to double over 1500 and 5,000 in Doha (at the world championships in September) and the way I finished the last 400, it’s amazing.”Hassan’s was not the only classy middle-distance performance of the night as Nijel Amos ran the fastest 800 metres seen since the 2012 Olympics as he posted one minute 41.89 seconds.Nobody has gone under 1:42 since the memorable final in London seven years ago when Kenya’s David Rudisha set the current world record of 1:40.91 and Botswana’s Amos ran his own best of 1:41.73 to take the silver medal.Amos followed the pacemaker through halfway in 49 seconds on Friday and held on strongly on a perfect night for the distance, with warm, wind-free conditions.Cheruiyot Rotich of Kenya chased him all the way and posted his own personal best time of 1:42.54 as the first nine finishers clocked their fastest times of the season.”I did an impossible session on Tuesday and after that, I knew I could run 1:41,” said Amos. “The world record is not in my mind but if I’m patient, it will come.”TECHNICAL RACEThose fireworks meant that, for once, the men’s 100 metres was not the biggest race of the night – though it was still an excellent one as Justin Gatlin won it in 9.91 seconds, edging fellow Americans Noah Lyles (9.92) and Mike Rodgers (10.01).”It’s all about putting together a good technical race, to use my experience,” said Gatlin, defying all the traditional rules of sprinting at the age of 37.”It feels great to beat these guys. This season is surreal, I can’t believe I’m still winning here after more than 20 years. Noah is a great runner, so every time I race him, I’m excited.”American Kendra Harrison won an exciting 100m hurdles in a season’s best 12.43 while Diamond Trophy holder Shaunae Miller-Uibo was a clear winner in a strong field in the 200m in 22.09.In a chaotic men’s 400 metres there was a false start and Jonathan Jones of Barbados did not hear the recall.Jones ran the entire race on his own, while Colombian Anthony Zambrano ran 200 metres, with neither man able to take part in the restarted race a few minutes later.American Kahmari Montgomery, who made the false start, was allowed to start the race, which was won by Steven Gardiner, who also ran on for a while during the initial mess, in 44.51.”I covered almost 100m but I stopped when I saw everybody stop,” he said Gardiner of the Bahamas. “I came back and re-focused and went again.”Montgomery finished the race but was later disqualified. (Reporting by Mitch Phillips, additional reporting by Gene Cherry, editing by Ken Ferris)last_img read more