BAHAMAS Courtesy Call By Ms Eilleen Shania Twain Country Singer Youre Still

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#Bahamas, December 11, 2017 – Nassau – Country Singer & Songwriter, Eileen “Shania” Twain & Family paid a courtesy call on Prime Minister, Dr. the Hon. Hubert A. Minnis at the Office of the Prime Minister, December 7, 2017.Pictured are Prime Minister Minnis (centre right), Eileen Shania Twain (centre) & Family, with OPM Staff.(Photo/Yontalay Bowe, OPM Media Services) Related Items:last_img

Hamann Bayern Munich would struggle to beat Liverpool

first_imgEx-Germany international Dietmar Hamann doubts Bayern Munich would be able to beat Liverpool in the Champions League knockout stagesNiko Kovac’s side finished top of Group E following their 3-3 draw at Ajax on Wednesday night with Bayern only dropping points twice in their six games.But Hamann, who won the Champions League with Liverpool in 2005 and started his playing career at Bayern, reckons the German club must hope they do not get drawn against the Reds for a last-16 tie.“Liverpool and Atletico [Madrid] are the strongest of the teams that ended in second place,” Hamann wrote on his column for Sky.divock origi, liverpoolReport: Origi cause Klopp injury concerns George Patchias – September 14, 2019 Divock Origi injury in today’s game against Newcastle is a cause for concern for Jurgen Klopp.Perhaps with one eye on Tuesday’s trip to Italy…“What Liverpool showed was amazingly impressive once again. Klopp and his team are the last opponents I’d want to face.“I think Bayern would have little chance against them in the round of 16. For me, Bayern are not in the extended circle of favourites for the first time in many years.“The Reds lost three games away from home and still progressed. Sometimes, such things trigger something very special in a team.”The draw for the last-16 stage of the 2018/19 Champions League will be made on Monday at 12:00 (CET).last_img read more

RIP Fusion Sport Fords surprisingly fun midsize sedan

first_img 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better 2017 Ford Fusion Sport: A 325-horsepower midsize sleeper sedan 58 Photos 1:34 Ford Fusion V6 Sport blows the competition away More From Roadshow Tags Now playing: Watch this: 2019 Ford F-150 review: Popular pickup keeps on truckin’ Enlarge ImageThe Fusion Sport makes 325 horsepower from its 2.7-liter, twin-turbo V6 engine. Jon Wong/Roadshow The Ford Fusion sedan is expected to go out of production in the coming years, all part of the Blue Oval’s plan to scale back its car lineup in order to build more crossovers and SUVs. A new report from CarsDirect this week confirms the 325-horsepower Fusion Sport will be the first variant to go — in fact, it won’t even live to see 2020.A Ford spokesperson told CarsDirect that discontinuing the Sport will allow the company to focus on higher-volume, more popular Fusion models. The rest of the Fusion line received a modest update for the 2019 model year, which included the standard fitment of Ford’s Co-Pilot 360 driver assistance tech.The Fusion Sport was introduced in 2017, and honestly, we rather liked it. With a 2.7-liter, twin-turbocharged V6 under its hood, the Fusion Sport put 325 horsepower and 380 pound-feet of torque to the ground, and standard all-wheel drive and adaptive dampers made it pretty engaging to drive on winding roads. It was a real sleeper, and came loaded with driver assistance features and Ford’s Sync 3 infotainment tech.That said, the Fusion Sport was kind of a hard sell. Despite its ample power and sophisticated suspension tech (it could even mitigate potholes), it was never quite as sharp as similarly sized rivals from Germany and Japan. Even now, at over $40,000, a 2019 Fusion Sport is some $3,600 more expensive than a comparably equipped, all-wheel-drive Fusion Titanium, which uses a more efficient (but still plenty potent) 2.0-liter turbocharged engine.It’s unclear exactly when the rest of the Fusion range will get the ax, though we’ve heard the Fusion name could be resurrected on a Subaru Outback-like crossover-wagon thing. For now, though, pour one out for the Fusion Sport: the powerful midsizer that struggled to gain traction. Sedans Ford Subaru Comment 1 Ford Share your voice 2016 Ford Explorer review: Go road-tripping in Ford’s updated, EcoBoost-powered SUVlast_img read more

UN deplores Myanmar Bangladesh deal on Rohingyas

first_imgRohingya refugee. File PhotoUN officials have condemned a deal struck between Myanmar and Bangladesh to start repatriating Rohingya refugees, apparently for failure to involve the UN refugee body with the process.The Guardian newspaper quoted the UN refugee agency confirming they have not been consulted about the plan.The UNHCR reportedly said, conditions in Myanmar’s Rakhine state is ‘not yet conducive’ for return of Rohingyas who fled their homeland following crackdown by the Myanmar military.The Guardian mentioned that Bangladesh and Myanmar government officials announced this week they had struck a “very concrete” repatriation deal for the return of the 720,000 Rohingya refugees.Myanmar officials, according to the report, said on Wednesday they had verified 5,000 Rohingya refugees so far, with the “first batch” of 2,000 to be repatriated in the next month.Stéphane Dujarric, a spokesman for the UN secretary general, António Guterres, was quoted to have said that the deal had taken the UN high commissioner for refugees (UNHCR) by surprise.“To be clear … UNHCR, which is in lead on the issues of refugees, was not consulted on this matter,” Dujarric said at the daily press briefing given by the secretary general’s office.Chris Melzer, the UNHCR’s senior external officer based in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, reiterated this, saying: “UNHCR was not a party to that agreement, wrote the British newspaper.“We would advise against imposing any timetable or target figures for repatriation in respect of the voluntary nature and sustainability of return,” added Melzer.“It is unclear if refugees know their names are on this list that has been cleared by Myanmar. They need to be informed. They also need to be consulted if they are willing to return … It is critical that returns are not rushed or premature.”Hundreds of thousands of Rohingya have been living in cramped refugee camps in Cox’s Bazar for more than a year after fleeing rape, murder and arson in Rakhine state at the hands of the Myanmar military, the report pointed out.The Myanmar government signed an agreement with the UNHCR in June that they would work with the UN to create “safe and dignified” conditions for the return of the Rohingya to Rakhine, including guaranteeing security, freedom of movement and pathway to citizenship.The Guardian said none of these assurances have been made by the Myanmar government so far and the UNHCR has only been given restricted access to Rakhine state.“For UNHCR, the conditions in Rakhine state are not yet conducive for a return to Myanmar,” said Dujarric. “And, at the same time, we’re seeing Rohingya refugees continue to arrive from Rakhine state into [Bangladesh], which should give you an indication of the situation on the ground.”Bangladesh has handed Myanmar a list of 24,342 refugees whom they have cleared for repatriation, but details of the logistics and precise date of the repatriation are unclear, the report said.It added that the issue of consent and possible forced repatriation has also been raised, with Rohingya in Cox’s Bazar saying they were fearful of going back and had never been asked whether they wanted to return.Myanmar officials, including Myint Thu, the permanent secretary at Myanmar’s ministry of foreign affairs, visited the camps in Cox’s Bazar on Wednesday and were greeted by hundreds of Rohingya protestors who held placards demanding citizenship and security, according to media report.“We are here to meet with the people from the camps so that I can explain what we have prepared for their return and then I can listen to their voices,” Myint Thu was quoted to have said.Safiullah, who was among the refugees who met the Myanmar members, had asked whether the Rohingya would be able to return to their own villages and get back their confiscated land and other properties but “the Burmese officials did not give me an answer”.“I will not return to Myanmar even if the authorities enlist me for repatriation. I am sure this is the view of almost all Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh,” he was quoted to have said.Suktara Begum, a Rohingya refugee woman who spoke to Myint Thu on his visit to the camps, said: “They came to meet us today simply because of pressure from the international community. They have not taken one step to meet our demands in so many months. They are not serious about our return to our homes. We do not trust them.”last_img read more

Texas School Districts Struggled To Use Law That Could Stave Off State

first_img Share For school districts with chronically failing campuses, a recently passed law that allows them a reprieve from state sanctions was supposed to be a lifeline. A year on, less than a tenth of those districts are on track to take advantage of it.About 60 Texas schools in more than two dozen districts were considered failing for four or more years in 2017, putting them at risk for being shut down by the state next year. Several of those school districts considered using Senate Bill 1882, which allowed them to partner with outside organizations to turn those schools around and get an extension from harsh state penalties, but only five are currently on track to do so.Others had trouble meeting the tight application deadline or faced backlash from school communities that protested giving up the management of their low-performing schools, many of which are located in majority Hispanic and black neighborhoods.“They’ve taken on a new process, challenging because it is new, and they’ve done it in a really hard context of a long-term, low-performing campus,” said David Anderson, policy analyst at Raise Your Hand Texas, which has been following the implementation of this law. “It’s sort of a perfect storm in the sense of hard to do.”The Texas Education Agency last week made a first round of decisions on six districts’ partnership applications, rejecting one district’s proposal, approving another’s contingent on technical changes and requesting interviews with the proposed partner organizations for the last four. It plans to make final decisions before the next school year begins.Three years ago, Texas passed a strict law intended to force districts to take responsibility for bolstering schools that failed to meet standards by setting deadlines for improvement and imposing sanctions on those that didn’t meet them. After a slow phase-in, the state is poised next school year to impose those sanctions, which include forcibly shutting down schools considered failing for more than three years or taking over the school boards of those districts.SB 1882 at first seemed like it could offer some help for school administrators in need of more time to implement fixes: districts that partnered with a nonprofit, charter organization or university to overhaul failing schools could receive a two-year reprieve from state penalties as well as additional state funding.But the process was harder than it seemed. “People go through a couple of stages of this where they initially say, ‘Oh my, that’s a bunch of money.’ Then they see what they really have to do to make it work, and that is daunting,” Anderson said.Dallas ISD Superintendent Michael Hinojosa said he was unwilling to wait months to decide how to proceed with three schools that had been listed as failing for four or five years. “We would be insulting your intelligence as well as any potential partners to have them consider something and have a plan in by March 1,” he told board members in November, according to the Dallas Morning News. The TEA released the guidelines in late February and March, and districts faced an April 30 final deadline to submit their applications.Some Dallas ISD board members and community members also didn’t want to give up the reins of their schools, said board member Miguel Solis. Under SB 1882, districts are required to sign contracts giving the charter group or university authority over the schools’ operations and employees.“The fear from some of my colleagues was that the innovation that we are actually doing related to school choice in Dallas ISD would have been at risk of being taken away from the district’s control and basically given away to universities to run as they pleased,” Solis said. Instead, Dallas ISD officials are planning to close and consolidate some schools and use the district’s own program to try to turn struggling schools around by paying high-performing teachers stipends to work at them.Solis argued the state should be spending more money on innovative programs districts already have in place. “We have data that shows this is a more effective innovation strategy,” he said.Victoria ISD Superintendent Robert Jaklich proposed partnering with local University of Houston at Victoria to manage two schools that had been failing for five years. It would have received an estimated additional $1,921 per student — $2.1 million total — from the state each year of a proposed three-year partnership.But he couldn’t get the contract together in time and so got a terse letter from the state last week saying his request for an extension on state sanctions had been denied. Jaklich isn’t too worried about the rejection: he’s positive that school leaders have managed to turn those schools around, and that they’ll receive passing marks in August’s accountability ratings, largely based on standardized test scores. “We’re extremely confident that all of them are going to make it,” he said.Not all school administrators are as optimistic. Houston ISD has been the key example for the high stakes of the upcoming state penalties, with 10 failing schools putting Texas’ largest district at risk of state takeover. In a disastrous board meeting that ended in multiple arrests, Houston ISD proposed applying for a turnaround partnership to hand over the management of its schools to a charter group called Energized for STEM.Community members turned out in protest, furious at the drastic proposal on a tight timeline, and district officials and board members backed away from the proposal.Houston ISD has another option for a reprieve. It could receive a waiver from its state ratings this year because of the massive financial and phsyical destruction it suffered under Hurricane Harvey — which would delay the sanctions another year.Anderson thinks more districts will be poised to apply for partnerships next year, with more time to plan, and especially as schools continue to trigger potential state takeover. “The campuses people weren’t so concerned about because they were three-year low-performing, if they turn into four-year [low-performing campuses] in August, you have this whole discussion again,” he said.Disclosure: Raise Your Hand Texas and the University of Houston have been financial supporters of The Texas Tribune, a nonprofit, nonpartisan news organization that is funded in part by donations from members, foundations and corporate sponsors. Financial supporters play no role in the Tribune’s journalism. Find a complete list of them here.last_img read more

Central Ayurveda Research for Drug Development to observe Dhanvantari Divas on November

first_imgKolkata: The Central Ayurveda Research for Drug Development in Salt Lake has taken up a month long programme to observe Dhanvantari Divas on November 5.The institution under the Central Council for Research in Ayurvedic Sciences has been conducting various awareness programmes at its premises in Salt Lake for the past few days where knowledge is being disseminated among people from various walks of life. Public lectures are being conducted to spread awareness on how various ailments can be checked by adopting one of the traditional and oldest methods of treatment. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeDr Achintya Mitra, a research officer of the 50-day countdown programme for celebration of Ayurveda Day 2018 said awareness camps have been conducted at various places where trainings are being provided on a healthy life style. Various herbs and medicinal plants are also being distributed among people at free of cost. Trainings are also being provided on how to identify the medicinal plants. Dhanvantari Divas is also celebrated as the Ayurveda Day. It may be mentioned that according to Hindu mythology, Dhanvantari is an avatar of Vishnu. He appears in the Vedas and Puranas as the physician of the gods and the god Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedof Ayurveda. A marathon would also be organised in Salt Lake on November 5 to aware people about Ayurveda which is one of the oldest forms of treatment in India and how people can prevent various ailments only through a change in the lifestyle and food habit. Dr Sushovan Paul, President of Bengal chapter of the National Ayurveda Students and Youth Association said: “Ayurveda is an integral part of the country’s progress. It is not only a treatment but a philosophy of life as well. Ayurvedic treatment was introduced in Bengal in Gupta Era. Due to the apathy of the government at the Center, Ayurveda could not be promoted on a large scale. We are thankful to the present government for its new initiative.”last_img read more