Antelope Valley Calendar

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREBlues bury Kings early with four first-period goals 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! SATURDAY J&J Social and Travel Club will take its monthly bus trip to “The Glory of Christmas,” noon-9 p.m. Call (661) 267-2586. Low-cost Facilitated Parenting Group will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. Court approved. Call (661) 266-8700. Seniors Lunch-Bingo Hour, noon-5 p.m. the fourth Saturday of each month at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. Sponsored by Buklod ng Pagkakaisa (Bond of Unity). Call Emerita Ross at (661) 723-7876 or Marie Cabrera at (661) 726-5309. Al-Anon will have a Spanish-speaking discussion meeting, 9 a.m. at 38345 30th St. E., Suite C-3, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-9353. Facilitated Anger Management Group for ages 8-11 will meet, 2:30-4 p.m.; teens, 4:30-6 p.m., and adults, 10:30-noon or 12:30-2 p.m. at the Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or (800) 479-CARE or visit the Web site: www.frf.av.org. Beginning yoga, 9-10 a.m. at Unity Church of Antelope Valley, 39149 8th St. E., Palmdale. Call (661) 273-3341. Women and Self-esteem support group meets in the Acton area. Call (661) 947-0839. Healing Heart support group will meet, 4-5:30 p.m. at the Salvation Army store, 45001 Beech Ave. in Lancaster. Call (661) 943-5830. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 9 a.m. at St. Stephen’s Lutheran Church, 1737 E. Ave. R, Palmdale. Call Jane at (661) 945-4798. Women Midlife Transition Support Group for women over age 40 is facilitated by a professional psychotherapist. Call (661) 947-0839. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. in Room 13 at Lancaster United Methodist Church, 918 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 724-1820. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.todayna.org or www.sava-na.org. MONDAY Beyond the Light, a socialization and support group for young adults, ages 17 1/2 to 25, with mental health issues, will meet, noon-1 p.m. at Transitional Youth Services, 104 E. Ave. K-4, Lancaster. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595. Jazzercise classes, 5:30-6:30 p.m. at George Lane Park, 5520 W. Ave. L-8, Quartz Hill. Call (661) 722-7780. Snyders Dance Groove will give ballroom, Latin, country and swing dance lessons, 6-8:30 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. For ages 40 and up. Cost: $3 per person. Call (661) 609-6510. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Co-Dependents Anonymous Step Study will meet, 6-7 p.m. at Antelope Valley Hospital, multipurpose meeting room, second floor, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 944-4927. 12 Step Recovery Groups for alcohol and drug addiction, co-dependency, relationship addiction, overeating, fear and anxiety issues, meets, 7 p.m. at Desert Vineyard Christian Fellowship, 1011 E. Ave. I, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-2777. Recovery Inc., a self-help group for people with panic attacks, anxiety or depression, will meet, 2 p.m. at Antelope Valley Hospital, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster, third floor. Call (661) 943-3956. The Palmdale Elks Lodge, 2705 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale, will host bingo at 5:30 p.m. The grill will be open. Call (661) 947-2027. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 6-7 p.m. at Lancaster United Methodist Church, 918 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 722-0393. Co-Dependents Anonymous will host a 12-step recovery program, 7:30-9 p.m., at Antelope Valley Hospital, multipurpose meeting room, second floor, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 944-4927 or (661) 946-5846. Grief Recovery Outreach Group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or visit www.frf.av.org. Adult Anger Management Group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700. The Highs and Lows, a support group for those diagnosed with manic depression or related disorders, will meet, 7-9 p.m. at Lutheran Church of the Master, 725 E. Ave. J, Lancaster. Al-Anon will have a discussion, 7 p.m. at 51st Street West and Avenue K, Lancaster. Child care provided. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter 572 will meet, 9-11 a.m. at the Mayflower Gardens chapel, 6570 W. Ave. L-12, Quartz Hill. Call (661) 943-3089. Early bird bingo games will begin at 6 p.m. with regular games beginning at 6:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Elks Lodge, 2705 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale. Call (661) 947-2027. Early bird bingo games will begin at 6:30 p.m. with regular games beginning at 7 p.m. at Paraclete High School, 42145 30th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 943-3255; Monday evenings: (661) 943-1017. Billiard Gang for seniors will meet, 9:15 a.m.-4 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Flex and stretch, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat and hand weights. Call (661) 267-5551. Parent support group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 1529 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite 203, Palmdale. The facilitated group is for parents who need help coping with family issues. Call (661) 266-8700. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 6 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38530 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 273-1016. Expectant parents can tour the Antelope Valley Hospital obstetrics department, 1600 W. Ave. J in Lancaster, and get information on what to expect during hospitalization, at sessions starting at 6 p.m. Visitors meet in the main lobby. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org. TUESDAY J&J Social and Travel Club will meet for its weekly league bowling, 6-8 p.m. at Sands Bowl, 43323 Sierra Highway, Lancaster. Call (661) 267-2586. Prostate Cancer Support Group meets, 12:30 p.m. the third Tuesday of each month at Lutheran Church of the Master, 725 E. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call Susan Baker at (661) 273-2200. Toddler story time for children ages 2-6, 9:30 and 11:30 a.m. at Barnes & Noble, 39228 10th St. W., Palmdale. Call (661) 272-9134. Celebrate Discovery, a Christian-based 12-step program, will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Palmdale United Methodist Church, 39055 10th St. W., Palmdale. Call (661) 947-3103. Jazzercise classes, 5:30-6:30 p.m. at George Lane Park, 5520 W. Ave. L-8 in Quartz Hill. Call (661) 722-7780. Lupus International Support Group meets, 6:30-8 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month in Palmdale. Call Danielle Duffey at (888) 532-2322, Ext. 4. Successful Anger Management course, 7-9 p.m. in Lancaster. Call (661) 538-1846. Sand Creek Orators, Toastmaster International meets, 7:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at Hummel Hall, 2200 20th St. W., Rosamond. Call Miik Miller at (661) 256-0328. Caregiver Support Group will meet, 5:30-7 p.m. in Conference Room 1 at Lancaster Community Hospital in Lancaster. Sponsored by ProCare Hospice. Call (661) 951-1146. Tears in My Heart Support Group will meet, 10:30 a.m.-noon and 5:30-7 p.m. at ProCare Hospice, 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Rocketeers Toastmasters meets, 1:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at the Air Force Research Laboratory. Call Pam Raneri at (661) 275-5287. Pancho Barnes Composite Squadron 49, Civil Air Patrol, will meet, 6-8:30 p.m. at Rosamond Sky Park, 4171 Knox Ave., Rosamond. Call (760) 373-5771. Antelope Valley Archaeology Club will meet, 9:30-11 a.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5656. Grief Support Group will meet, 5:30-7 p.m. at the Hoffmann Hospice, 1832 W. Ave. K, Suite D-1. Call (661) 948-8801. Toastmasters Sand Creek Orators Club will meet, 7:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at 2500 Orange St., Rosamond. Call Miik Miller at (661) 256-0328. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Snyders Dance Groove meets, 6-8:30 p.m. the first and second Tuesdays of each month at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. Cost: $2. Call (661) 609-6510. Mothers of Preschoolers (MOPS) meets, 9-11:30 a.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month for brunch, speakers and crafts at Central Christian Church, 3131 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Cost: $6 per meeting, plus $2 per child for child care. Scholarships are available. Call (661) 945-7902. 12 Step Recovery Group for alcohol and drug addiction will meet, 7 p.m. at Desert Vineyard Christian Fellowship, 1011 E. Ave. I, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-2777. American Indian Little League will meet, 7 p.m. at HomeTown Buffet, 422 W. Ave. P. Call Harry Richard at (661) 267-2259. High Desert Woodworkers Club meets, 6:30 p.m. the first Tuesday of each month at Denny’s restaurant, 2005 W. Ave. K, Lancaster. Call (760) 240-4705. Grief/Bereavement Group will meet, 10 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. at ProCare Hospice, 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Youth Anger Management Group for ages 8-11 will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or (800) 479-CARE, or visit the Web site: www.frf.av.org. Plane Talk Toastmasters will meet, noon-1 p.m. at the Lockheed Federal Credit Union, 1011 Lockheed Way, Palmdale. Call (661) 572-4123. Harmony Showcase Chorus of Sweet Adelines International will rehearse, 7:30 p.m. at 44857 Cedar Ave., Lancaster. The group is part of an international organization of women who sing four-part harmony. Call (661) 273-0995, (661) 285-1797 or (661) 940-3109. Al-Anon will hold a discussion, noon at 1737 E. Ave. R, Room 104, Palmdale, and at 7 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, Room 704, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Cardio Knockout Blast, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat. Call (661) 267-5551. Billiards Gang for seniors, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy Program representative will be available, 1-3 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551 for an appointment. Tumbleweed Card Club for seniors will play canasta, pinochle and other games, 1-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Line dancing, 6-7 p.m. for beginners and 7-8:30 p.m. for intermediate dancers at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Palmdale Youth Council will meet, 5:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Parks and Recreation office, 38260 10th St. E., Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5611. Sierra Club will offer one- to two-hour conditioning hikes leaving at 6 p.m. from the Palmdale Park and Ride lot, Avenue S at the Antelope Valley Freeway. Moderately conditioned beginning hikers are welcome. Call (661) 273-2761. Expectant parent tours of the Antelope Valley Hospital obstetrics department will start at 6 p.m. from the hospital lobby, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 7-9 p.m. at Our Savior Lutheran Church, 1821 W. Lancaster Blvd., Lancaster. Beginners will meet at 7 p.m. Call (661) 948-2571. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 10:30 a.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38530 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-4178. Also in Lancaster, 6:30 p.m. at Sunnydale School, 1233 W. Ave. J-8. Call Karen at (661) 723-9331. Overeaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 7:15 p.m. at Robin’s Law Office, 203 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 949-9192. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org.last_img read more

Two-sport star Van Dyk still going strong

first_img29 April 2013South Africa’s Ernst van Dyk, who won a silver medal in the hotly contested London Paralympic hand cycling road race at Brands Hatch, is a two-sport star. His most recent foray abroad brought him more wheelchair racing success in the Boston and London marathons.Van Dyk, a nine-time Boston Marathon winner, claimed silver this time around in the American city and picked up bronze in London a week later.“These two marathons have always been back-to-back, so to win a double six days apart would be quite an achievement,” he said in an interview with Cycling South Africa.HecticVan Dyk endured a hectic six days in the wake of the Boston Marathon bombings, but thankfully returned home unscathed. “Initially we heard the first explosion,” he said. “Nobody was sure what it was. I thought it might be premature fireworks and everyone ran to the window of the hotel where we were celebrating the end of the race.“As we stared out, the second explosion occurred right in front of our window. It was an incredible blast and people got badly hurt. I couldn’t imagine who would do such a thing.“The Boston marathon has so much history. And they didn’t attack the runners. It was targeted at the families supporting the athletes.”SwimmingThe South African star, who as a 17-year-old also competed in swimming at the 1992 Barcelona Paralympics, has been one of the leading wheelchair racers in the two marathons for the past 14 years, but he also switches to hand cycling from time to time too.“For the London Paralympics I focused on cycling,” he said. “During the Beijing Paralympics, I won a gold medal in the cycling road race and a bronze medal in the wheelchair marathon. I was the only athlete to medal in two sporting codes.”Discussing last year’s Paralympic Games, Van Dyk added: “For London, we did not get a lot of athletics spots, so I gave up my place, which I achieved by finishing in sixth at the 2011 World Champs, so that a youngster could make the team, seeing that I was already going for cycling.”Van Dyk says the two sports of hand cycling and wheelchair racing are similar in terms of tactics. “The big difference is that in wheelchair racing we don’t have a crank, chain or gears. So physically, it’s very pure.Only two“I’m one of the very few athletes doing both disciplines. I think there are only two of us.”Besides his achievements in competition, Van Dyk is also very proud of the fact that he was the first person with a disability to graduate with a degree in sports science from Stellenbosch University.He is an ambassador for the International Paralympic Committee and the Laureus Sport for Good Foundation.SAinfo reporterWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

SS Mendi tragedy on stage at the Soweto Theatre

first_img11 November 2014 Warona Seane on stage in the play Ukutshona ko Mendi (The Sinking of the Mendi). (Image: Mark Wessels, Goethe-Institut )The poem Ukutshona Kukamendi (The Sinking of the Mendi) by SEK Mqhayi sums the 1917 tragedy of the sinking of SS Mendi just off the Isle of Wight in the English Channel quite succinctly.A reader may assume that the overall tone of the poem would be total indignation and hatred directed at the powers that be that sent 600 men, mostly from South Africa’s rural Pondoland in the Eastern Cape, to fight a war that was alien to them.The men set sail from Cape Town on 16 January 1917 on their way to support the British Army in France during the First World War. Unfortunately, they were never to see their native country again.Mqhayi’s poem is a praise piece. It reveals the deep sorrow of a nation that has lost some of its brave sons, swallowed by the deep blue sea on their way to fight for a worthy cause. It describes the last acts of 600 men, bravely accepting their fate as the ship sank on a foggy morning of 21 February.The brave acts of the doomed South African men did not escape attention. Years later to recognise and honour the valour of the soldiers, any South African citizen who performs an act of bravery is awarded the Order of the Mendi.Ukutshona ko Mendi . Did We DanceAlmost 100 years later, the sinking of SS Mendi and the last moments of the brave men on board has been brought to life in a play written by Lara Foot and directed by Mandla Mbothwe. Ukutshona ko Mendi . Did We Dance recounts the sinking of SS Mendi vividly. The title of the play describes the last dance of the barefoot “death dance’ performed by the Members of the South African Native Labour Corps (SANLC) on the deck of the SS Mendi as the ship took water and sank to bottom of the sea.With support from the Goethe-Institut, the Rosa Luxemburg Foundation and the British Council, Foot and Mbothwe are taking the play to the Soweto Theatre from 25 to 30 November, after a stint at the Baxter and Market theatres earlier this year.A statement from the organisers says the play has been met with great acclaim. “[The play] has been hailed as magical realism storytelling at its finest, conveying a uniquely South African story set against the backdrop of World War One,’ says the statement.The staging of the play is part of a series of lectures, films and panel discussions organised by the Goethe-Institut to commemorate the centenary of the beginning of the First World War, the 75th anniversary of the start of the Second World War and the 20th commemoration of the 1994 genocide in Rwanda.“We want to shed light not only on the European experience of the First World War, but also on the many South African stories linked to it – such as the tragedy of the SS Mendi, which is being told in this exceptional theatre production,’ says Norbert Spitz, Director of the Goethe-Institut South Africa.The SS MendiOn 16 January 1917, the SS Mendi troopship sailed from Cape Town to La Havre in France, carrying the 5th battalion of the South African Native Labour Contingent. About 805 black privates, 22 white officers and 33 crewmembers were on board.On the morning of 21 February 1917, just south of the Isle of Wight, the 4 000-ton steamship was rammed and almost cut in half by an 11 000-ton liner, the SS Darro. It sank in 20 minutes, killing 607 black troops, nine white officers and all 33 crewmembers.Stories of the troops’ bravery is legend. It is said Reverend Isaac Wauchope Dyobha calmed the dying men by saying: “Be quiet and calm my countrymen, for what is taking place now is what you came here to do. We are all going to die, and that is what we came for.“Brothers we are drilling the death drill. I say here and now that you are all my brothers. Xhosas, Swazis, Pondos, Basotho and all others, let us die like warriors. We are the sons of Africa. Raise your war cries my brothers, for though they made us leave our assegais in our kraals, our voices are left with our bodies.”Today the SS Mendi is honoured by the South African Navy, which has among its fleet the SAS Isaac Dyobha, a warrior-class fast attack craft, and the SAS Mendi, a valour-class frigate. In 1995, Queen Elizabeth II unveiled a Mendi memorial at Avalon Cemetery in Soweto to commemorate the disaster. Another plaque was also unveiled at the Delville Wood Museum in France.The castUkutshona ko Mendi . Did We Dance stars Warona Seane, Apollo Ntshoko, Bongile Mantsai, Lulamile Nikani, Mongenzi Ncwadi, Owen Manamela and Thando Doni.The Soweto Theatre season is primarily aimed at high school learners, hence there will be matinee performances at 3pm on 26, 27, 28, 29 and 30 November. There will also be 8pm performances on 25, 26 and 28 November 2014. However, the general public is welcome to attend any of the matinee or evening shows.To ensure as many learners get to watch the play at the Soweto Theatre, the British Council is giving away free tickets to schools. Interested schools can contact Ncebakazi at the Soweto Theatre on 011 930 7463.To book tickets to Ukutshona ko Mendi . Did We Dance log on to the Soweto Theatre website or call 011 930 7463. Discounts are available for block bookings and schoolsAs a follow up to staging of Ukutshona ko Mendi . Did We Dance, a free teachers’ workshop organised by the South African History Archive (SAHA), will take place at the Constitution Hill on Saturday, 29 November. To book a place please contact SAHA on 011 718 2560 or email info@saha.org.za.SAinfo reporter and Joburg.orglast_img read more

Lobster Season opens midAugust

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Crawfish Season opens August 15 and closes on March 15 2017. Related Items: Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppLobster season will not open on the first day of August, it will open on the 15th day of August and officials issued notice Friday for restaurants and fishermen and the residents to be aware of the legal open season.  DECR Director, Dr John Claydon calls the two week change a benefit to the country’s number three industry, fisheries.  “Last season the fishing community of the Turks and Caicos benefited from an increase in crawfish landings. This appears to be the result of the stock starting to rebuild…” last_img

HDMI 21 What you need to know

first_img 61 Photos Samsung Q900 85-inch 8K TV hands-on: A beautiful beast Today’s devices mostly use HDMI version 2.0, or one of its several iterations. We’ll see a handful of TVs in 2019 with full or partial 2.1 implementations. How does that affect you? Not much. You can’t upgrade your current TV to 2.1 spec, and there are no HDMI 2.1 sources yet. This update is quite forward-thinking and takes into account formats and resolutions that won’t be widely available for years. However, if you’re considering certain new TVs in 2019 and beyond, you should make sure you understand the limitations of 2.0, and what 2.1 will offer if you choose to wait on your TV purchase. Sarah Tew/CNET The short version Don’t like reading (much)? Allow me to fire some HDMI 2.1 bullets. The physical connectors and cables the same as today’s HDMI.Improved bandwidth from 18 Gbps (HDMI 2.0) to 48 Gbps (HDMI 2.1).Can carry resolutions up to 10K, frame rates up to 120fps.New cables are required for higher resolutions and/or frame rates.The first products will arrive in 2019.The increased resolution and frame rate possibilities are a futurist’s dream: 4K50/604K100/1205K50/605K100/1208K50/608K100/12010K50/6010K100/120You should be able to get 4K/60, and a basic 8K/30, with current cables, but the rest will need an Ultra High Speed HDMI cable. More on these new cables below.On the color front, 2.1 supports BT.2020 and 16 bits per color. This is the same as HDMI 2.0a/b, and is what makes wide color gamut possible. Those are just the highlights, though. Read on for the details. 47 OK, let’s get this done up front. Yes, there’s a new cable with HDMI 2.1, but you don’t need to upgrade. At least not yet. HDMI 2.1 brings new features and a lot more bandwidth to the venerable cable and connection. However, it’s going to be many years before you’ll see it on the average television. If you’ve got your eye on a fancy new high-end TV though, there are some things you should keep in mind. We’ll get to those further down. The good news is, the connector itself isn’t changing. Your current cables will work even when you finally get a device with HDMI 2.1. You will need new cables to take advantage of the new features and resolutions possible with 2.1 but again, it will be years before those become commonplace. All about the bandwidth When you increase the resolution of a TV signal, the amount of data of that signal goes up. A 3,820×2,160 4K UltraHD signal sent over HDMI is roughly 4 times the amount of data as an HD 1,920×1,080 signal. If you think of cables as pipes, you need a bigger pipe to transmit a 4K signal than a 1080p one. The same is true if you increase the frame rate. You need a bigger pipe to transmit a 60 frame-per-second image than you do a 24fps image of the same resolution. More images per second, more data. The best TVs of CES 2019 Home Entertainment Audio Computers Related Info Now playing: Watch this: 2:30 How HDR works Wide Color Gamut Do you need new HDMI cables for HDR? Why all HDMI cables are the same Though most current HDMI cables can handle nearly all of today’s content, the TV industry never sits still. Down the road we might see higher frame rate TVs, and we’re already starting to see higher resolutions, like 8K TVs. Don’t worry, they’re not going to be common any time soon either. Even way farther down the road, maybe we’ll even see 10K TVs. This is predominantly what HDMI 2.1 is for. Not for 99 percent of people now, but for the future versions of ourselves who want to send their 4K TVs native 120fps material, or their 8K TVs 60fps material. Far future versions of ourselves playing content that doesn’t currently exist… Unless you’re a gamer. Personal computers, and high-end gaming rigs at that, are the only current source that can output 4K at more than 60fps. The Xbox One X can do 120fps, but only at lower resolutions and therefore doesn’t require HDMI 2.1. Other than gaming, there’s basically no current content that requires the bandwidth of HDMI 2.1. Since there’s no indication of movies or TV moving towards higher framerates, except for perhaps sports, the higher framerates possible with the HDMI 2.1 specification are likely to go unused by most people. Yes, in theory you could finally send your 120 Hz TV a 120 Hz signal (which isn’t how they work now), but again, there’s no non-gaming 120 Hz content now or planned, so this is pretty unlikely. Already we’re seeing 8K TVs, and to get fully-featured 8K content to the TV, you will need HDMI 2.1. Since even 4K is higher resolution than most people need, given common TV sizes and seating distances, 8K is really overkill. However, TV manufacturers love increasing resolution because it’s relatively easy to improve, and makes for an easy marketing push as “better.” It’s inevitable 8K TVs will be common, but that’s many years away. Plus, those TVs will be better and cheaper than today’s models.  It’s worth keeping in mind that there are currently no public discussions about 8K sources, so even if you get an 8K TV, you’ll have nothing to plug into it except your current 1080p and 4K sources. So if you want to get an 8K TV now, don’t worry about finding new cables that will pass 8K resolutions (more on these below). Since there likely will be 8K sources eventually, you should definitely make sure your 8K TV has HDMI 2.1 so you can use them. If you don’t, you run the risk of your expensive 8K TV not being compatible with whatever 8K source finally arrives. This is exactly what we saw with early 4K TVs, none of which are able to play content from 4K Blu-ray players or 4K media streamers.  Useful additions While the new resolutions and frame rates get all the headline buzz, but there are some other improvements that will be more useful for most people. “Dynamic HDR” is an amusing name for a big improvement. High dynamic range is our favorite picture-quality improvement since high-definition itself, and right now the most common HDR format is HDR10. It uses something called metadata to tell the TV how to treat a piece of HDR content. In the current version of HDR10, that metadata is applied once and once only, on a per-program basis. As in, you get One Set of Data to Rule Them All. Dynamic HDR can vary how each scene or even each frame looks, not just the program as a whole, to better suit that scene (or frame). Here’s a video that shows some examples (but remember, you’re viewing it on non-HDR screens). Basically, a dark scene with bright highlights (campfire at night) would take advantage of HDR differently than a bright scene with dark areas (someone under a pier on a beach at noon). If these scenes were in one movie, static HDR would treat these the same, while Dynamic HDR would let each scene look its best. HDMI 2.1 enables Dynamic HDR, but it also needs to be present in the content to work.  Dolby Vision, HDR10+, and certain flavors of Technicolor’s Advanced HDR, already uses dynamic metadata and can pass over a existing HDMI connections. This aspect of HDMI 2.1 ensures going forward this will be possible without a proprietary format (HDR10 has no licencing fees).  hdmi-hdr3imagecomparison.jpgRemember, you’re viewing an SDR image on an SDR display, so this is for illustration purposes only. The idea of Dynamic HDR is for each scene to be able to take advantage of HDR to look its best. Current Static HDR can only have one set “look” for the entire movie or show. HDMI Forum “eARC” is the next evolution of Audio Return Channel, which allows simpler connections between AV devices like TVs, video players and sound systems. eARC has support for “the most advanced audio formats such as object-based audio, and enables advanced audio signal control capabilities including device auto-detect.” Basically this means Dolby Atmos over ARC at full resolution, which you currently can’t do. However, your current cables probably can. If, in the future, you buy an HDMI 2.1-compatible TV and an HDMI 2.1-compatible sound bar, your current High Speed cables should be able to transmit eARC. Audio doesn’t require the bandwidth that video does. hdmi-gamemodevrr.jpg HDMI Forum “Game Mode VRR” is a potentially interesting feature for gamers. It allows for “variable refresh rate, which enables a 3D graphics processor to display the image at the moment it is rendered for more fluid and better detailed gameplay, and for reducing or eliminating lag, stutter and frame tearing.” In other words, there will be less of a buffer for frames while the video card creates the image so you won’t have to choose between image artifacts and input lag, ideally reducing both. If this sounds familiar, it’s because it’s similar to Nvidia’s G-Sync and AMD’s FreeSync, both only available over DisplayPort. We wrote more about this feature in How HDMI 2.1 makes big-screen 4K PC gaming even more awesome. Game Mode VRR will also work over current cables (between two pieces of 2.1-compatible gear), though if you’re trying to push greater-than-4K60 video, you’ll need an Ultra High Speed HDMI cable.  Speaking of that… New cable For the first time in a while, there is a new cable. It looks… well, it looks the same as the old cable. There’s no new connector; that stays the same. These were originally called “48G” cables since they will have 48 Gbps bandwidth, though now they’re officially called Ultra High Speed HDMI cables. These have roughly 2.6 times the 18 Gbps that the better-made HDMI cables have now. These cables are backward compatible, so they’ll work with all your other HDMI gear (at whatever speed that gear operates). hdmi-bandwidthcomparison.jpgA visual representation of how much more bandwidth the upcoming 48G cables can handle. 18 Gbps is plenty for nearly all current content. HDMI Forum There’s no reason to buy an Ultra High Speed HDMI cables cable now. The first generation of these cables are rare, overpriced, and do nothing for your current gear. When, down the road, you have gear that can take advantage of the extra bandwidth or features, then you should upgrade. They’ll be cheaper then, too. Check out What HDMI cable do you need? for some cheap options now. We found out some other interesting HDMI cable info at CES 2019, like how longer, copper cables might not work, and how there was no compliance testing yet. The latter means that cables labeled Ultra High Speed in 2018 and early 2019 might work, and they might not. HDMI Licencing has no way of testing them yet. Yet another reason to hold off buying new cables.  When? We’ll start to see TVs with HDMI 2.1 in 2019, with more in 2020 and beyond. However, not all TVs that claim HDMI 2.1-compatibility are actually capable of everything we’ve discussed. HDMI Licensing, the organization in charge of the HDMI specification, is allowing companies to claim 2.1 compatibility even if they don’t support every aspect. So a TV that can’t accept 8K/60, but has eARC and Variable Refresh Rate, still can claim it’s 2.1… as long as the company specifies what aspects of 2.1 it can support. This is bound to lead to confusion, as it will no longer be possible just to check what version of the connection a product has, but also what features of 2.1 the product may or may not support. Ideally these aspects will be easy to spot, but given how many features and tech specs every TV already has, this unquestionably makes things just that little bit more difficult.  If you are buying an 8K TV, don’t expect the manufacturer to add any HDMI 2.1 features the TV lacks when new. It’s possible that a firmware update might give your TV those capabilities if it doesn’t out of the box, but then, it might not. TV manufacturers are very hit-or-miss when it comes to adding features to older televisions. Sometimes it’s not physically possible, other times it’s not economically possible.  HDMI 2.1 is like a brand new 10-lane highway in the middle of the countryside. There’s not much reason for it right now, but it offers an easy way to expand in the future. If you’re not considering an 8K TV then it’s a 10-lane highway in the countryside of a different state or country. Cool, but not something that will impact your immediate future. Got a question for Geoff? First, check out all the other articles he’s written on topics such as why all HDMI cables are the same, LED LCD vs. OLED, why 4K TVs aren’t worth it and more. Still have a question? Tweet at him @TechWriterGeoff then check out his travel photography on Instagram. He also thinks you should check out his sci-fi novel and its sequel. Comments Tags 4K TVs HDMI Share your voicelast_img read more

Residents Support Bowser Transition Efforts

first_imgIn this Nov. 5, 2014 file photo, Washington Mayor-Elect Muriel Bowser speaks during a news conference at the National Press Club in Washington. Bowser won on the strength of the Black vote.The District’s mayor-elect recently announced her transition team that will aid her move toward power. Residents seem pleased by what they see thus far.Mayor-elect Muriel Bowser (D) appointed former D.C. Superior Court Judge Mary Terrell, Brookings Institute and public financing expert Alice Rivlin, retired Pepco executive Beverly Perry, Mary’s Center leader Maria Gomez and union leader John Boardman as the co-chairs of her transition team on Nov. 7. Bowser also appointed four former mayors of the city, Sharon Pratt Kelly, Anthony Williams, Adrian Fenty and Marion Barry, who now is the Ward 8 council member, as co-chairs of the committee.“We have just 56 days to work on our transition,” Bowser said. “We all are committed with a sense of urgency.”She said that she will make further appointments in the form of working committees specializing in areas such as criminal justice, employment and economic development.Bowser will take the reins of the District’s government in early January 2015.Lorenzo Green, who serves as an advisory neighborhood commissioner in Ward 8, is impressed with Bowser’s selections.“I feel that she is moving in the right direction,” Green said. “She has selected people from the city’s past and present, and they should serve her well.”Green was also pleased that Bowser opted to make her transition announcement in Ward 8 at an office building under construction in the Historic Anacostia neighborhood. While Green is pleased with Bowser’s efforts, Martin Moulton, a Libertarian and resident of Ward 6, has some reservations.“It seems like to me that we are getting the same old people running things,” Moulton said. “I like Miss Bowser, but seem like to me that corporate money is dictating things. Corporate money buys politicians and matters like housing, jobs and schools are being ignored.”He continued, “We have qualified people in the city who can help her run it. We have a diverse population and there are people with top talent who live here already. We need competition for those jobs that Bowser is offering, not just the same old faces.”Rivlin served on the transition team of D.C. mayor Vincent Gray (D) in 2010 and is a well-known economist and has served on the Federal Reserve Board as a governor and vice chair. She has worked as the director of the U.S. Office of Management and Budget and founding director of the Congressional Budget Office. She has also served as the chairman of the District’s financial control board from 1998-2001, which was the agency that helped the city get out of its perilous fiscal state during that time.Terrell is known locally for her efforts to support young people through her term on the Superior Court bench from 1997-2008.  She is also the founder of the High Tea Society, an organization that encourages Black girls to learn and practice social graces and etiquette.Gomez is the president and CEO of Mary’s Center, headquartered in Ward 4. Mary’s Center provides social and health care services primarily to Latino residents in Washington, D.C.Perry is the former senior vice president for governmental affairs for Pepco and has raised money on behalf of the African American Civil War Memorial. Boardman is the head of UNITE HERE Local 25, a hotel union that backed Bowser in her mayoral bid.The Rev. Anthony Motley is impressed by Bowser’s selections but said that a key element is missing.“I don’t think there is someone from Ward 8 or Ward 7 on her transition team other than Mr. Barry,” Moulton said. “She made a pledge to pay attention to the concerns of residents east of the [Anacostia] and she said that she will have a deputy mayor dedicated to east Washington. I think she could have selected someone other than Barry.”Barry’s presence on the transition team is a relief to Debora Rowe, the executive director of Returning Citizens United Inc.“We know that Barry will watch out for our interests because he has been a returning citizen,” Rowe said, referencing the six months Barry served in federal prison in the early 1990s for drug charges.last_img read more