Nissan to reveal new 2020 Versa at a music festival

first_img Nissan New York Auto Show 2019 Nissan More From Roadshow 96 Photos Apr 19 • Volkswagen’s US CEO says around $25,000 would be a smart price for a small pickup See All reading • Nissan to reveal new 2020 Versa at a music festival May 29 • 2020 Ford Escape: Everything there is to know Today’s Nissan Versa is one of the oldest compact cars you can buy, having been first introduced back in 2011 as a 2012 model. Then at the 2014 New York Auto Show, the Versa received a facelift for the 2015 model year. While the Versa is impressively affordable, it’s never been one of our favorites and it feels out-of-date compared to its competition.With the April 12 debut putting the Versa’s reveal right before the start of New York Auto Show press days, we should get a chance to see the new car in the Big Apple, too. Either way, check back with Roadshow for full details and photos once the 2020 Nissan Versa is revealed. Apr 19 • Acura MDX PMC Edition is a hand-assembled SUV in brilliant red paint Tags The completely redesigned 2020 Nissan Versa will debut at Rock the Ocean’s @festivaltortuga in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida on April 12, 2019. #TortugaFest #NissanVersa2020 pic.twitter.com/cmc3DPSM62— Nissan (@NissanUSA) March 28, 2019 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealouscenter_img 0 2020 Nissan Versa first drive: 15% more price, 100% more car New York Auto Show 2019 • Enlarge ImageThe current Nissan Versa, shown here, will soon be replaced. Nissan Carmakers increasingly use special events to introduce new cars away from the hubbub of international auto shows, and it appears Nissan will follow that route with its smallest sedan. Nissan announced Thursday that it will reveal the new 2020 Versa at the Tortuga Music Festival in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, on April 12.While the teaser photo and video hint at the introduction happening on or at least near the beach, there are few other clues about the 2020 Nissan Versa. The company says only that the sedan has been “completely redesigned,” signaling an all-new model rather than a refresh of the existing Versa. Share your voice Post a comment 2019 Nissan Murano looks different, but feels right 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better Apr 19 • Check out the gory details in Honda’s IIHS crash-tested HR-V Sedanslast_img read more

Trump And Erdogan Talk But Theres Disagreement Over What Was Said

first_img Share Kayhan Ozer/APTurkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan speaks in Ankara during the funeral prayers for Sergeant Musa Ozalkan, the first Turkish soldier to be killed in Turkey’s cross-border “Operation Olive Branch” in northern Syria, on Tuesday.President Trump, speaking to Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan Wednesday, urged Ankara to scale back its military operations in neighboring Syria following an offensive launched by Turkish forces against U.S.-backed Kurdish insurgents in Syria’s Afrin region.At least that is how the conversation about the Turkish operation, known as “Operation Olive Branch,” is being reported by the White House.Separately, though, both Reuters and Al-Jazeera quote an unnamed Turkish source as giving a substantially different account of the conversation.A readout from the White House Wednesday says Trump “relayed concerns that escalating violence in Afrin, Syria, risks undercutting our shared goals in Syria,” adding that the president “urged Turkey to deescalate, limit its military actions, and avoid civilian casualties and increases to displaced persons and refugees. He urged Turkey to exercise caution and to avoid any actions that might risk conflict between Turkish and American forces.”Reuters and Al-Jazeera report from identical statements indicating that the White House version of the call is not accurate.“President Trump did not share any ‘concerns about escalating violence’ with regard to the ongoing military operation in Afrin,” the source said, according to the news agencies.“The two leaders’ discussion of Operation Olive Branch was limited to an exchange of views,” the source said.The White House statement also said: “President Trump also expressed concern about destructive and false rhetoric coming from Turkey, and about United States citizens and local employees detained under the prolonged State of Emergency in Turkey.”However, Al-Jazeera reports:“[The] Turkish official denied there was any mention of the state of emergency or the phrase ‘destructive and false rhetoric coming from Turkey.’” ‘[Trump] mentioned that open criticism of the United States raised concerns in Washington,’ according to the source.”Anadolu Agency/Getty ImagesTurkish military tanks are prepared for deployment as part of the “Operation Olive Branch” to Syrian border in Hatay, Turkey, on Thursday.NPR’s Peter Kenyon, speaking with Morning Edition from Istanbul, observes that “Ankara’s version of this exact same call is remarkably different, basically accusing the U.S. of misstating the content of what was said.”He says, “It’s the latest in a series of disagreements. It’s just the latest sign that anti-American sentiment here is running stronger than it has in years. Meanwhile, you’ve got some conservatives in the U.S. questioning whether Turkey even belongs in NATO anymore.”Reporting earlier this week, Peter said Turkey’s offensive, which pits Turkey against U.S.-backed Kurds fighting ISIS, has “alarmed several countries and led to an emergency session of the United Nations Security Council.”“The fighting has thrown a spotlight on the confusing and at times conflicting alliances and goals in the U.S.-led anti-ISIS coalition,” Peter says.On Tuesday, Turkey said it had killed 260 Syrian Kurdish fighters four days into its offensive. Washington has expressed concern over the hundreds of thousands of civilians who could be caught in the crossfire.Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more

Texas School Districts Struggled To Use Law That Could Stave Off State

first_img Share For school districts with chronically failing campuses, a recently passed law that allows them a reprieve from state sanctions was supposed to be a lifeline. A year on, less than a tenth of those districts are on track to take advantage of it.About 60 Texas schools in more than two dozen districts were considered failing for four or more years in 2017, putting them at risk for being shut down by the state next year. Several of those school districts considered using Senate Bill 1882, which allowed them to partner with outside organizations to turn those schools around and get an extension from harsh state penalties, but only five are currently on track to do so.Others had trouble meeting the tight application deadline or faced backlash from school communities that protested giving up the management of their low-performing schools, many of which are located in majority Hispanic and black neighborhoods.“They’ve taken on a new process, challenging because it is new, and they’ve done it in a really hard context of a long-term, low-performing campus,” said David Anderson, policy analyst at Raise Your Hand Texas, which has been following the implementation of this law. “It’s sort of a perfect storm in the sense of hard to do.”The Texas Education Agency last week made a first round of decisions on six districts’ partnership applications, rejecting one district’s proposal, approving another’s contingent on technical changes and requesting interviews with the proposed partner organizations for the last four. It plans to make final decisions before the next school year begins.Three years ago, Texas passed a strict law intended to force districts to take responsibility for bolstering schools that failed to meet standards by setting deadlines for improvement and imposing sanctions on those that didn’t meet them. After a slow phase-in, the state is poised next school year to impose those sanctions, which include forcibly shutting down schools considered failing for more than three years or taking over the school boards of those districts.SB 1882 at first seemed like it could offer some help for school administrators in need of more time to implement fixes: districts that partnered with a nonprofit, charter organization or university to overhaul failing schools could receive a two-year reprieve from state penalties as well as additional state funding.But the process was harder than it seemed. “People go through a couple of stages of this where they initially say, ‘Oh my, that’s a bunch of money.’ Then they see what they really have to do to make it work, and that is daunting,” Anderson said.Dallas ISD Superintendent Michael Hinojosa said he was unwilling to wait months to decide how to proceed with three schools that had been listed as failing for four or five years. “We would be insulting your intelligence as well as any potential partners to have them consider something and have a plan in by March 1,” he told board members in November, according to the Dallas Morning News. The TEA released the guidelines in late February and March, and districts faced an April 30 final deadline to submit their applications.Some Dallas ISD board members and community members also didn’t want to give up the reins of their schools, said board member Miguel Solis. Under SB 1882, districts are required to sign contracts giving the charter group or university authority over the schools’ operations and employees.“The fear from some of my colleagues was that the innovation that we are actually doing related to school choice in Dallas ISD would have been at risk of being taken away from the district’s control and basically given away to universities to run as they pleased,” Solis said. Instead, Dallas ISD officials are planning to close and consolidate some schools and use the district’s own program to try to turn struggling schools around by paying high-performing teachers stipends to work at them.Solis argued the state should be spending more money on innovative programs districts already have in place. “We have data that shows this is a more effective innovation strategy,” he said.Victoria ISD Superintendent Robert Jaklich proposed partnering with local University of Houston at Victoria to manage two schools that had been failing for five years. It would have received an estimated additional $1,921 per student — $2.1 million total — from the state each year of a proposed three-year partnership.But he couldn’t get the contract together in time and so got a terse letter from the state last week saying his request for an extension on state sanctions had been denied. Jaklich isn’t too worried about the rejection: he’s positive that school leaders have managed to turn those schools around, and that they’ll receive passing marks in August’s accountability ratings, largely based on standardized test scores. “We’re extremely confident that all of them are going to make it,” he said.Not all school administrators are as optimistic. Houston ISD has been the key example for the high stakes of the upcoming state penalties, with 10 failing schools putting Texas’ largest district at risk of state takeover. In a disastrous board meeting that ended in multiple arrests, Houston ISD proposed applying for a turnaround partnership to hand over the management of its schools to a charter group called Energized for STEM.Community members turned out in protest, furious at the drastic proposal on a tight timeline, and district officials and board members backed away from the proposal.Houston ISD has another option for a reprieve. It could receive a waiver from its state ratings this year because of the massive financial and phsyical destruction it suffered under Hurricane Harvey — which would delay the sanctions another year.Anderson thinks more districts will be poised to apply for partnerships next year, with more time to plan, and especially as schools continue to trigger potential state takeover. “The campuses people weren’t so concerned about because they were three-year low-performing, if they turn into four-year [low-performing campuses] in August, you have this whole discussion again,” he said.Disclosure: Raise Your Hand Texas and the University of Houston have been financial supporters of The Texas Tribune, a nonprofit, nonpartisan news organization that is funded in part by donations from members, foundations and corporate sponsors. Financial supporters play no role in the Tribune’s journalism. Find a complete list of them here.last_img read more

State CID files chargesheet against Bimal Gurung 71 others

first_imgDarjeeling: State CID on Monday filed the charge-sheet for the June 8, 2017 case in which Gorkha Janmukti Morcha (GJM) supporters and leaders had locked horns with security forces in Darjeeling while a Cabinet meeting was on in the hill town. Around 72 persons including Bimal Gurung have been named in the charge-sheet.A CID team on Monday filed the charge-sheet on Monday at the Chief Judicial Magistrate Court in Darjeeling. “A total of 72 persons has been named in the charge-sheet including Bimal Gurung, Asha Gurung, Roshan Giri, Dipen Malay, Prakash Gurung and Swaraj Thapa,” stated Pankaj Prasad, Assistant Public Prosecutor, Darjeeling. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeA total of 7 persons including Binay Tamang, Mandip Sharma, Amod Mukhia, Jyoti Kumar Rai, Dewraj Dewan and John Rai has been discharged owing to lack of evidence. “However, the charge-sheet stated that investigation is still open and that the CID can file a supplementary charge-sheet later on,” added Prasad. The accused have been charged under various sections of the Indian Penal Code including Sections 307 (attempt to murder); 120B (criminal conspiracy), along with different sections of the West Bengal Maintenance of Public Order Act and Prevention of Damage to Public Property Act. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedThe Gorkha Janmukti Morcha (GJM) under the leadership of Gurung had locked horns with the security forces on June 8, 2017. The GJM party was on agitation in the Hills. Police reports claim more than 45 security force personnel were injured in the clash. A police booth was set on fire. Around 15 police vehicles were torched along with a state government Bus. Army was deployed in Darjeeling, Ghoom and Kurseong to control the situation. On that day, the GJM had taken out rallies and staged a sit-in demonstration a short distance away from Raj Bhawan where the Cabinet meeting was taking place. Later, the demonstration turned violent and clashes ensued. The GJM in turn had alleged that many of their supporters were also injured in the clashes. Police had lodged a suo moto FIR and a case had been started at Darjeeling Sadar Police Station on June 9. The case was handed over to the CID on June 29, 2017. On September 6, arrest warrants were issued against Gurung, Asha Gurung, Roshan Giri and 5 front rung GJM leaders. The CJM Court had ordered them to appear in court and surrender in November 2017. Bimal Gurung, Asha Gurung, Roshan Giri and others failed to appear on the designated date. On March 28, 2018, the CID had prayed these absconders be declared as offenders and their movable and immovable properties be attached. The court then issued an order of attachment of Gurung’s house. It was attached on August 2. Following this, properties of other leaders including Prakash Gurung were also attached as per the court order. Prior to this, in June, Bimal Gurung and Roshan Giri’s names were struck off from the electoral rolls in Darjeeling.last_img read more

Mamata welcomes IAF officers return

first_imgKolkata: With India’s fighter pilot Abhinandan Varthaman returning to his homeland on Friday night after being in Pakistan’s custody for two days, Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee welcomed his return.”Welcome home #AbhinandanVarthaman Welcome home sweet home,” Banerjee wrote on her Twitter handle. Banerjee on Thursday accused the Narendra Modi government of seeking political mileage over the air strike carried out by the Indian Air Force in Balakot, stressing on the fact that the Centre is yet to divulge the truth about the terrorists allegedly killed in the strike. Also Read – Bose & Gandhi: More similar than apart, says Sugata Bose”The people of India have a right to know what exactly happened during the air strike. The Centre must allow our forces to speak the truth. They should also come clean on the number of terrorists claimed to have been killed during the air strike,” Banerjee had maintained. While speaking to the media at Nabanna on Thursday, the CM hit out at the Modi government, saying: “Ahead of the forthcoming elections, the Centre is keen on deriving political mileage from the air strike that has been conducted by our Air Force. The jawans defend our borders and we all hold them in high esteem. But politicising the whole issue only to satisfy one’s political interest is condemnable.”last_img read more